scene.org File Archive

File download

<root>­/­mags­/­staticline/sl-050.txt

File size:
77 634 bytes (75.81K)
File date:
2004-01-27 23:03:07
Download count:
all-time: 2 040

Preview

                                           /\
                                          /. \
     _____ _____.        _____ _____.    //   \  ______
 .___\_   \_    |    .___\_   \_    |   //    .\/  _   \_
 |    |    |    |____|_  _|    |    |____|_   |    |    |
 |    |____|    ______/  \_    |    ______/   |    |    |
 ^\____   \|    |____|    |    |    |____|    |    |____|
 |    |    |    |    |    |    |    |    |    |    |____.
 |.   |    |.   |    |.   |    |.   |    |    |.   |    |
 |:   |    |:   |    |:   |    |:   |    |    |:   |    |
 ||   |    ||   |    ||   |    ||_  |    |    ||   |    |
 |    |    |    |    |    |    | \  |    |    |    |    |
 ^\_______/^\_______/|____|    |  \_____/|    |\_______/^
                       cRu|________\     |    |                  Issue #50
                                         |. __|__    /\   ____    ____
                                         |: \   / __/. \__\_  \___\_  \_ _.
 November, 2003                          ||    /  \ \__/   /   /   /___// |
 300 Subscribers World Wide              |    /___/  \    /   /   __/_ /  |
                                         |   /   /   /   /   /   /   //   |
                                         ^\____ /___/___/   /^\____ //____|
                                              \/       /___/      \/

--=--=--
--=--=------=--=------=--=----
  Table Of Contents
--=--=------=--=------=--=----
     Opening:
        Message From the Editor
     Features:
        The Anatomy Of A Scale
        Interview With Legalize (Rich Thomson)
     Reviews:
        Music:
           On The Sideline --
              "Pure Me (zverimix)" and "Pure Me (dogs trix mix)"
           The Lineup -- Monthly Music Listings
        Demo:
           Screen Lit Vertigo -- "Retox" and "Feed Your Machine"
     Opinion / Commentary:
        Coplan's Eyes -- A New Challenge
     Link List: Get Somewhere in the Scene
     Closing: Staff and Contact Information


--=--=--
--=--=------=--=------=--=----
  Message From the Editor
--=--=------=--=------=--=----

  Hi all,

  Apologies for the late issue this month. It's around that time of year
  where demoparties are thin on the ground, so I'm afraid we haven't got any
  party reports to bring you this month. However, we do have some good
  articles to bring you, including the third part of Dilvie's music theory
  articles and an interview with Legalize (who organised the Pilgrimage
  demoparty back in August, and wrote an article about it in issue #47), and
  this month, Coplan's Eyes are fixed on change in the demoscene.

  Staff writer Seven reviews two demos this month, Novus brings us this
  month's best music in the Lineup, and Ben takes a look at two remixes of
  "Pure Me".

  This month is also the 50th issue of Static Line, and by coincidence, we
  have exactly 300 subscribers at the time I'm writing this - and that's
  just the people who actually subscribe to the list; others might read it
  on the website ( http://staticline.scenespot.org/ ), or a friend might
  forward it to them, etc. Either way, Static Line couldn't have grown as
  much as it has without its readers and contributors. So, to everybody who
  reads the magazine - thank you!

  One quick notice that I forgot to mention last month - in issue #48,
  Secnuop's report on Pilgrimage mentioned Dilvie and his girlfriend Marcy.
  Her name is actually Maria, and they're happily married. Sorry about that!

  See you next month, and here's to another 50 issues!

                 --Ciaran


--=--=--
--=--=------=--=------=--=----
  The Anatomy of a Scale
    Tones, Intervals, and Triads
  By:  Dilvie
--=--=------=--=------=--=----

  Now that we've gone over key signatures and had a brief look at modes,
  it's time to probe deeper into the anatomy of  scales.  Don't worry.  I
  won't torture you with lame ascii art clef signs.  Sibelius is much
  easier.  If you're interested in notation, it's the best notation software
  I've seen.  Check it out: <http://www.sibelius.com/>.

  For this article, I created two printable reference sheets.  You may need
  to scale them down in a print preview window to make them fit nicely on a
  page.  I used PNG to make the files small, but the page size info was
  probably lost in the translation.

  Scale Tones
  <http://www.dilvie.com/music/education/scale_tones.png>

  Intervals and Triads
  <http://www.dilvie.com/music/education/intervals_and_triads.png>

  Let's start out with the scale tones.  The modern major and minor scales
  that have been in popular use in recent centuries are called diatonic (two
  toned) scales.  The reason for that is that there are two types of steps
  in a diatonic scale:  A half step (semitone) and a whole step (whole
  tone).  The pattern of half steps and whole steps in the scale creates the
  character of the scale.  That character is the difference between major
  and minor, and in chords, the difference as well between augmented and
  diminished.  If you're confused about how those half step/whole step
  patterns work, you may want to refer to last month's article on modes
  before we press on.

  Each tone in the scale has a unique role to play in music, and, not
  surprisingly, they each have a name (other than the obvious: 1, 2, 3, 4,
  5, 6, 7).  They are (in order), tonic, supertonic, mediant, subdominant,
  dominant, submediant, and the leading tone.  Take a glance at the C Major
  intervals on the "Intervals and Triads" reference sheet for a visual that
  might help you understand how the roles differ.  It will probably help to
  play each of the intervals while you're trying to understand their
  relationships.

  In a song, the tonic grounds us to the key.  It helps us to understand
  what we're hearing and make some sense of it.  Even when the tonic is not
  playing, the melody and harmony are still grounded by it.  In fact, this
  mental tendency is so strong, some composers will drone on a single note
  (the tonic of the next key) for twenty or more bars in order to signal our
  brains that a key change is coming so that we don't get lost when it
  happens.

  To understand the roles of the other notes, it's important to understand
  the concept of triads.  A triad is a chord with three notes in it.  Chords
  are very simple.  To construct one, start with any scale tone, and then
  add successive scale tones, skipping every other tone.

  The reason that the number three is so important here will become clear as
  you ponder the relationships between tonic, subdominant, and dominant
  triads.  As you'll see, triads link the upper half of the octave to the
  lower half of the octave, and the third of every triad also plays a huge
  role in the quality of the chord, but we'll get to that later.

  The rood triad consists of 1, 3, and 5 (tonic, mediant, and dominant).
  Next to the root triad, the most influential triad in the key is the
  dominant triad, consisting of 5, 7, and 2 (dominant, leading tone, and
  supertonic).

  Normally, the dominant chord has a strong tendency to resolve to the root
  triad (tonic).  This is true for a couple of reasons.  The root of the
  dominant chord is the 5th of the tonic chord.  This is called a common
  tone.  Any two chords that have one or more chord tones in common tend to
  follow each other easily in music.

  In addition, the dominant chord has two tendency tones that "want" to
  resolve to the tonic.  Tendency tones are tones that are dissonant with
  the tonic.  In a nutshell, a dissonant interval is one that creates an
  audible rhythmic beating pattern when it's played.  Consonant intervals
  blend smoothly and do not produce beat patterns.  Tendency tones create
  contrast between the chaos of the dissonance, and the unity of the
  consonant tonic chord.

  Because the dominant chord contains two tendency tones, as well as the
  previously mentioned common tone, a move from the dominant (V) to the
  tonic (I) is considered a strong resolution.

  To recap, the Tonic is the root of the key, it grounds us in the music and
  helps us understand the harmonic relationships of the notes we hear.  The
  dominant is an important tone because it is the 5th in the tonic triad.
  If you were really on the ball, you may have already noticed that it's
  also a 5th lower than the supertonic.  In other words, it is the
  subdominant note in the supertonic key.

  Still with me?  Good.  Pressing on: The subdominant shares a similar role
  to the dominant.  It is a 4th above the tonic, and a 5th below.  The
  dominant is a 5th above the tonic, and a 4th below.  The subdominant has a
  strong tendency to resolve to the dominant (see if you can guess why).
  For this reason, the progression I, IV, V, I is very common in music.

  The mediant is the third of the tonic chord.  Mediant means middle.  Get
  it?  The submediant is the third of the subdominant chord.  The mediant is
  a third above the tonic, and the submediant is a third below the tonic.

  We've already established that the leading tone "wants" to resolve to the
  tonic (which is why it's called the leading tone), but it's also
  interesting to note that the leading tone happens to be the third in the
  dominant triad (important to keep in mind when you learn about key
  changes).

  Speaking of key changes, one of the most common key changes is a move to
  the supertonic key, and that is where the supertonic gets its name.  The
  supertonic is the dominant of the dominant -- PHWEW!

  That's all I'm going to try to cover in this article.  If you're new to
  all this, you may want to keep those reference sheets handy and re-read
  this article a few times.  Music theory isn't all that complicated, but
  I'm serving up a lot of fundamental concepts that often get neglected
  (even in college theory classes).

                 --Dilvie


--=--=--
--=--=------=--=------=--=----
  Interview with Legalize (Rich Thomson)
  By:  Coplan
--=--=------=--=------=--=----

  To many in the demo scene, Rich Thomson, aka Legalize, isn't anyone
  special.  He's a programmer from Salt Lake City who has only been involved
  in the demo scene less than 2 years.  He is best known for his involvement
  in the organization of the Pilgrimage Demo Party in his home town.  It was
  not nearly the party one could expect of Europe, but it helped to carve
  more of an identity for the North American Demo Scene.  His length of stay
  alone has caused many to dismiss his ideas.  But after observing many of
  his tactics and some of his novel ideas, he is slowly earning more respect
  in the demo scene.

  This year, Pilgrimage was a small one day event.  Next year is almost
  guaranteed to be larger.  But what sets Rich apart from the traditional
  party organizer?  That is something I wanted to find out.  So I initiated
  this interview shortly after his demo party.  Some of my questions are
  based on discussions found on SceneSpot.org.  Others are based on an
  article he wrote for Static Line titled "Organizing a US Demo Party" which
  appears in Static Line #47 (August, 2003).  As you will see, Rich is quite
  a role model for the demo scene, regardless of his prior involvements.
  The following is an account of the interview:

  COPLAN: First, I want to find out a bit more about you and your life.  For
  the record, what is your full name and where (generally speaking) do you
  reside?

  RICH: Rich Thomson.  Salt Lake City, Utah (USA)

  COPLAN: What do you do for a living?

  RICH: I write software.  Currently I'm working in C# on a contract for
  LANDesk.  (http://www.landesk.com)

  COPLAN: That sounds like a useful skill in the demo scene.  Did that have
  any effect on your initial involvement in the demo scene?

  RICH: My involvement in programming got me interested in computer
  graphics.  My involvement in computer graphics got me interested in
  Direct3D.  My involvement in Direct3D introduced me to Phil Taylor.  Phil
  Taylor introduced me to the demo scene.

  COPLAN: When and how did you discover the demo scene, and to what extent
  have you been involved ever since?

  RICH: SIGGRAPH 2002 at the demo scene panel discussion
  (http://www.scene.org:8080/dog/news.html)

  Phil Taylor had been talking about the demo scene on the DirectX
  Developer's list, but I didn't know what 'demo scene' was about.  He
  recommended that I attend the SIGGRAPH panel discussion.  After the panel
  discussion, I went to the demo scene [Birds of a Feather Session] hosted
  by Vince Scheib in a meeting room in the bottom of the convention center.
  Mostly I remember people there asking me about Direct3D and catching a
  glimpse or two of demos out of the corner of my eye.  I had a little chat
  with Saku Lehtinen from the panel (Remedy Entertainment, Ltd.) at the
  [Birds of a Feather Session].

  COPLAN: What are your primary contributions?

  RICH: My contributions so far are organizing Pilgrimage 2003 and doing
  outreach talks.  I did most of the web content editing for the Pilgrimage
  web site.  I'm working on some productions in my copious spare time :-).

  COPLAN: What kind of productions are you currently working on?

  RICH:

     1) I've had an inkling of doing a hand-held Mandelbrot set browser for a
        long time.  I was originally going to do it in home brew LCD screens
        and so-on.  I could still do that, but it would be faster now to use
        one of the handheld consoles like GBA.  That's been a long-term
        project that could result in a simple console demo.

     2) I have a plan to create the world's largest fractal curve, that's
        probably the biggest conception of a wild demo the world's ever seen
        :-).

     3) More likely what you'll see from me first is some sort of complex
        plane iterated equation fractal set plotter done in a novel way,
        perhaps a 256b demo.  Amazingly enough, a search of 256b.com doesn't
        yield one!

     4) I wanted to do a 256b for Pilgrimage, thinking that being so small it
        would be the least likely to consume my time :-).  Still, there just
        wasn't time for that with everything else that went on.  The idea
        involves (again) plotting a chaotic fractal set that is rendered as a
        point cloud.  The trick is to get some decent antialiasing and gamma
        correction snuck into 256b.  I think it is not so hard for 256b, and
        perhaps even in 128b.

     5) I'm always working on some sort of novel fractal rendering.  I might
        enter one into a graphics compo sometime.

     6) I have some interest in algorithmic music generated through 1/f noise.
        I'd like to collaborate with a musician to generate something part
        algorithmically composed and part tracked/traditionally composed.

     7) Fractal animations might be submitted for a wild demo.  Yes...  there
        is a reason my personal card says "fractal freak" on it :-).

     8) More long-term I have ideas of bringing more storytelling to demos.  I
        have some story lines I've been working on in my head.

  COPLAN: What is your part in any of these productions?

  RICH: Usually coding and design.

  COPLAN: Are these productions affiliated with any group?

  RICH: At this point, I'm flying mostly solo.  I've formed Polygony with
  Mike No Worth.  Mike does music and some coding.  He's way better at the
  music than I am.  I was thinking of asking Oman to join us as an artist.

  COPLAN: Most of our readers know you as the organizer behind the
  Pilgrimage Demo Party.  Why did you decide to organize the Pilgrimage Demo
  Party (Held August 9th, 2003 in Salt Lake City)?

  RICH: I have always been interested in computer graphics, but always with
  an eye towards using the computer as an expressive medium.  The idea of
  working on CAD programs, or even games, was never as interesting as
  working on a custom fractal rendering!  Demos are the natural extension of
  that indulgence into an entire community of people who see computers as a
  new medium for expression, be it technical or aesthetic.

  COPLAN: What kind of obstacles did you uncover while organizing
  Pilgrimage?

  RICH: There were some logistical obstacles and some sociological ones.
  The logistic obstacles are the obvious things: getting a space, setting up
  the infrastructure for computer places and projection, and so-on.  I was
  prepared for obstacles of this sort.  The sociological ones were more
  unexpected and it surprised me how many negative comments were made when I
  told people what I had planned on doing.

  COPLAN: Were any of these comments from other party planners?

  RICH: Not as far as I could tell.  There are a lot of yakkers in the demo
  scene.  The negative comments came from yakkers.

  COPLAN: I imagine that's true in almost any population.  Were any of these
  comments, even the negative ones, at all helpful?

  RICH: Some discussions on the party organizer's list were helpful, but
  there too there was a lot of long laundry lists of things not to do.  We
  need more positive examples and stories of things that -worked- rather
  than things that didn't work, despite our tendency to focus on the screw-
  ups.  Much of the simple "duh" style advice I offered in my party report
  was the sort of thing that would have helped me if it had gotten to me
  earlier.

  I don't think the Europeans are used to the idea of having to do outreach
  and education to the community in order to generate participation in the
  demo scene.  Yes, they have to advertise their party and so-on, but there
  is a large enough audience of nearby sceners that they don't need to
  actively recruit new demo sceners in order to get started at this point.

  COPLAN: Did you find such comments discouraging; or did you find them as
  more of a challenge so that you could prove someone wrong?

  RICH: Neither really.  They were irritating and frustrating more than
  anything.  I never really heard back much from North American organizers
  until well after I had already figured out everything on my own and by
  that point their advice just seemed redundant.  When I asked early on in
  my organizing, I didn't get any response.  I chalk this up to human
  psychology more than anything else.  I don't think people want to be
  involved with something until they know its not going to sour their
  reputation by being associated with it.

  Since I was completely new to the demo scene, unless people knew me from
  computer graphics circles (SIGGRAPH, usenet, Direct3D, etc.), then I was
  just some new guy who showed up out of the blue saying he was going to
  organize a demo party.  I don't know how many of those kinds of guys have
  shown up before me, only to have all their plans turn out to be a cloud of
  hot air, but it seemed like people didn't want to be helping out
  Pilgrimage until it was really clear that this was For Real and it was
  Happening.

  Initially we didn't have a web site, we had no scene cred being newbies,
  and neither of us (Adam and myself) had organized anything like this
  before.  In the very beginning, our activities were mostly internal and
  resulted in no externally visible change to an outsider, leading the
  doubters to conclude that nothing was going to happen.  It got a little
  better after we got our initial web site up and running, but what really
  kicked things into gear was when we announced our sponsors and
  particularly prizes from ATI.

  COPLAN: Do you think that being located in a country which has
  traditionally had a more subdued contribution tot he demo scene had any
  effect on the planning of Pilgrimage?

  RICH: Its certainly easier to organize a party when you can tap an
  audience of potentially several hundred to several thousand demo sceners
  within a 500 mile radius.  The closeness and density of sceners in
  European cities and countries makes it easier for a party to get off the
  ground and grow.  Cities in the western US are far apart -- the next
  closest major city to Salt Lake City is Denver and that's still 350 miles
  away with the continental divide in between.

  COPLAN: Now that Pilgrimage is over, what have you learned from the
  experience?

  RICH: I've learned that more people need to be involved for it to be
  bigger :-).  It was exhausting enough doing a one day event by myself, I
  couldn't do anything larger alone.  I say "by myself", but Adam did help
  out where he could.

  COPLAN: What kind of changes and additions do you think you'll make for
  next year's Pilgrimage?

  RICH: The big thing is that we'd like to expand to a three day format.
  This is going into the selection for next year's party space, a process
  that has already begun.

  By expanding the event, it allows us to expand the range of compos, talks,
  seminars, etc.  I believe that Pilgrimage should focus on education and
  bootstrapping the US demo scene for at least 5 years.

  There are lots of other changes as well, most of them small.  The biggest
  organizational challenge is finding ways of getting more people involved
  in running the event.  I have been thinking of a system whereby we create
  a list of "roles".

  A person acting in a role will have responsibilities that go with the
  role.  For instance, a role might be "greeter" and the responsibilities
  would be to man the greeting table for a shift, say 4 hours, and do all
  the greeting person duties during that shift.  Then you take every task
  that must be accomplished for the event to function smoothly and you
  allocate it to an appropriate role, creating roles as you need them.  Then
  you find volunteers to take on the roles.  The volunteers know exactly
  what is expected of them in that role, so there is no miscommunication.

  For Pilgrimage 2004, we need at least the following roles:
     -  greeters
     -  compo jury members
     -  video postmaster
     -  speakers
     -  IT troubleshooter

  COPLAN: Aside from Pilgrimage, you've had your hand in a couple of demo
  scene outreach projects.  Perhaps you can tell us about some of them and
  what effect (if any) they have had on the North American demo scene.

  RICH: I don't think they've had any measurable effect on the demo scene
  yet.  Outreach projects are long-term efforts to build and sustain a local
  community around the demo scene.  If you see these people only once you
  have to be really impressive or they have to be inspired in order to make
  them participating sceners in just one exposure.  Persistent, long-term
  work at building the scene will have more effect than just a few isolated
  talks.

  We made a very good impression on First Night 2003, but neglected to have
  a contact sheet, mailing list, etc., setup to follow through on the
  connections we made that night.  This was unfortunate because those
  contacts were lost, but First Night is a yearly event so we might be able
  to renew some of those contacts in a more permanent fashion for First
  Night 2004.

  The real challenge for us now is to put together a decent talk for high
  school classes and start hitting the circuit of schools.  In the US, high
  school students are the perfect candidates for making demos:
     -  they've acquired enough skills to be productive
     -  they have the energy and time
     -  they (usually) don't have to pay bills :)
     -  they are willing to work hard for some cred in order to stand out

  Reaching out to high school students is probably the single most important
  thing that we can do to grow the demo scene in the US.

  COPLAN: First Night is a common event all over the United States, perhaps
  the world.  Seeing as it was relatively successful for you, others might
  consider some sort of similar event in their town.  What advice do you
  have for such an event?

  [Note:  Rich wrote an article titled "Organizing a US Demo Party" for
  Static Line, Issue #47 released in August, 2003.  This article is a great
  resource for outreach projects as well.  Some of this might be a bit
  redundant relative to that article.]

  RICH: Read all the stuff I've posted about outreach so far :-).  That's
  really the advice that I have and its more complete than anything I could
  write in a short space here.  As I do more outreach, I am meta-izing my
  outreach efforts so that they can be reused by people in other locations.
  If we are going to build a demo scene in the US, I can't be the only
  person doing outreach.

  I plan on practicing my outreach techniques and meta-izing them into
  outreach tools that everyone can use.  One small example of this is the
  pamphlet "What is the Demo Scene?" that I'm preparing as an evolution of
  my First Night pamphlet.  This year at First Night, I'm preparing poster-
  board presentations on various slices of the demo scene:
     -  what is a demo?
     -  what is a demo party?
     -  what is a coder?
     -  what is a tracker?
     -  what is real-time?

  These are intended to be short -- just a handful of paragraphs -- pieces
  of text in large type with pictures and diagrams to make it easy for those
  who don't want to read much.  They will explain various slices of the demo
  scene in easy to chew bite-sized morsels.  You place these on easels
  throughout any exhibit that you do so people can quickly learn for
  themselves about the demo scene without you having to say much.  If they
  want to learn more the pamphlet elaborates into the details.

  COPLAN: Aside from the reports and articles you have posted online, what
  resources might a person use in development of an outreach event?

  RICH: Get resources on non-profit corporations, volunteer organizations,
  building a movement, guerilla marketing, corporate philanthropy, local,
  state and federal grants and organizing political campaigns.  All of these
  structures have facets in common with organizing a successful long-term
  demo party.  If you just want to organize an informal gathering of demo
  sceners in a loose fashion, then most of that stuff won't matter because
  you'll just be doing something ephemeral.  Ephemeral one-shot events are
  fine.  You should do what is within your grasp, and if that's what you can
  do, then do it!  A classic organizing mistake is to bite off more than you
  can chew.  Walk before you try to run.

  COPLAN: You set up a non-profit organization for your Pilgrimage demo
  party.  I imagine your outreach projects will also fall under this
  organization.  Is there any opportunity for other North American people or
  groups to affiliate themselves with your organization in order to carry
  out their own outreach projects?

  RICH: Yes, this is possible.  The "nonprofits for dummies" book shows how
  you can work with an existing nonprofit corporation to operate under their
  organization as an umbrella before you can get your own situation going
  independently.  You may never need to form an independent nonprofit
  corporation if you can find the right umbrella group.  The umbrella
  organization usually has common or similar interests to those of your
  organization.  Using this approach the umbrella organization applies for
  all grants, etc., and then transfers any monies to your organization.

  COPLAN: Have you considered having chapters of your organization
  throughout the country?

  RICH: Its a possibility, but not one I'd commit to yet.

  COPLAN: Can we expect to see any more of these outreach projects over the
  course of the next several months?

  RICH: Of course!

  COPLAN: I know it's only a short time (as of this writing) after the
  Pilgrimage party.  But have you been able to recruit tentative helpers for
  more of your outreach projects or next years Pilgrimage?

  RICH: As far as the outreach goes, I think its still just myself and Adam.
  I do think that participation in Pilgrimage has gotten some local people
  interested to the extent that they might lend a hand as a volunteer next
  year.  If we increase the party to a traditional 3-day affair, then we
  will need lots more volunteers than we had this year.

  COPLAN: Alright, how about some politics in the demo scene?  A question
  that's often on debate in the demo scene:  Do you think the demo scene is
  more or less healthy than it was 8-10 years ago?

  RICH: I can't say, since I only have been paying attention personally for
  about a year.  However, I did a gross overall analysis of the number of
  parties in scene.org's ftp archive for each year.  Based purely on the
  number of parties, you could say that there has been somewhat of a slump
  in recent years.  However, this is only a gross look at the situation
  since it doesn't count sceners, only parties.  Canada has had 7 demo
  parties to our 4, so we are certainly slacking in the US.

  The demo scene is a product of human culture and as such, it suffers
  setbacks and triumphs.  Growth in the demo scene has never occurred
  linearly in a straight line.  I do know that scene.org reports that they
  need to acquire about 350 GB of disk space per year in order to keep pace
  with all the productions.  I don't see how you could say 350 GB/yr.  is
  not healthy!

  COPLAN: What do you think might help the North American contribution to
  the demo scene?

  RICH: Outreach is needed to get people aware and involved.  Outreach is
  one of those things where the turtle wins the race while the rabbit burns
  out.  Persistent and consistent efforts are what will build the demo scene
  most in the USA.  This will be the defining difference between a strong
  demo scene in the USA and a strong demo scene in Europe: in Europe, the
  scene evolved naturally out of the soup of PC experiences, whereas in the
  states I think it will take a more directed effort to intentionally build
  a demo scene.

                 --Coplan


--=--=--
--=--=------=--=------=--=----
  On The Sideline
    "Pure Me (sverimix)" by Prook and "Pure Me (dogs trix mix)" by Kakan
  By:  Ben
--=--=------=--=------=--=----

  Sometimes less is more, especially when it comes to music.  I've always
  been attracted to minimalist approaches, but it is difficult to explain
  why.  I don't think it is because minimalist music is simpler but because
  it is more to the point.  Often jingles are catchy because they have a
  strong idea that is easy to hum or tap along to.  It is another area of
  composing skill, yet it is more soulful than technical, and more fun than
  elitist.

  This month I am reviewing two songs from a set of nine.  These nine songs
  are remixes of "Pure Me" by Boop, and the songs are minimal electronic
  with varying styles.  It sounds like the remixes are incremental, that is
  one remix is based off "Pure Me", and another remix may be based off the
  first remix.  As a result some of the songs sound more similar to the
  original, and some stray way out into deep space.  All nine songs are in a
  single .zip file.  Boop's page is at
  http://www.pinerecords.com/boop/index2.html

  The track listing follows:
  1 "Pure Me (original)" - by Boop
  2 "Pure Me (deep Sweden)" - by Kakan
  3 "Pure Me (snowball)" - by Kakan
  4 "Pure Me (oops I did it again)" - Kakan
  5 "Pure Me (never steal the golfish's food mix)" - Kakan
  6 "Pure Me (zverimix)" - Prook
  7 "Pure Me (comix fix mix)" - Prook
  8 "Pure Me (dogs trix mix)" - Kakan
  9 "Pure Me (shuffle your face mix)" - ?

  Each of these songs has its own qualities, and I enjoyed listening to all
  of them.  I think "(snowball mix)" stays the truest to Boop's original
  style, literally containing several kinds of chirps and boops, and it has
  a beautiful sound.  But two of these songs in particular stood out to me:
  "Pure Me (zverimix)" and "Pure Me (dogs trix mix)".

  One Orbital song I remember, "Shadows", combines a light breakbeat with
  bubbly, echoing synth boops, and vibraphone.  I think the strong theme
  combined with the quiet yet busy drumline made the song memorable to me.
  "Pure Me (zverimix)" is done in a similarly enjoyable style, but it sounds
  a little less serious and more up-beat than "Shadows".  At first I thought
  the main instrument was a plucked instrument, but upon closer listening,
  it sounds more like a marimba or xylophone.  Only in this module it is
  much more polyphonic than a single xylophone, with frequent rapid echoes
  and the music literally sounds like bunnies hopping down a terrace.

  The sample list contains a line saying "(never steal the goldfish's food
  mix)", which leads me to believe "(zverimix)" is based off "(never steal
  the goldfish's food mix)".  The songs are very different to listen to, but
  "(never steal)" has a similar but slower xylophone theme at 1:00 through
  1:40 in the song.  Prook presents a tightly sequenced song that in my
  opinion has a more clean sound than "Shadows" or "(never steal)".  The
  percussion is lively, and I particularly like the mischievous flair of
  xylophones about 1:45 into "(sverimix)", where it sounds like it is about
  to spin out of control.

  "Pure Me (dog tricks mix)" is more mellow, and more of a quick ditty than
  a complete song.  It begins with a soft, melodic synth.  Kakan handles his
  key shifts elegantly and uses traditional progressions in an aesthetically
  pleasing way.  Too many times I hear trackers using poor transitions,
  abruptly throwing the listener into a new octave or key without any grace.

  The tune sounds comfortably similar to church-service synth-choir, and a
  romantic theme.  The song loops well, and would be fitting in a console
  RPG.  The musical idea is pretty contemporary, but not one I hear often in
  modules.  The first thing I thought upon hearing this was "Wow that's real
  music!", and I was disappointed that the song didn't expand on it longer
  than it did.

  One thing I'd like to note is that this didn't sound the same between any
  two mod players for me.  To me "(zverimix)" sounded best in mikmod-3.1.x,
  compared to dumb-0.9.2 and xmms-modplug-2.04.  For some reason the marimba
  lacked the bounce it had in the mikmod playback.  Kakan's "(dog tricks
  mix)" sounds butchered by mikmod due to incorrect sustain on the main
  synth instruments.  As always it is best to listen to these songs in the
  original tracker. In my opinion it is a small price to pay for being able
  to inspect the musical structure of the songs and produce true CD quality
  or better audio.

  Song Information:

  Title:       "Pure Me (zverimix)"
  Authors:     Prook (Original by Boop)
  File Size:   1M
  Source:      ftp://ftp.scene.org/pub/music/groups/camomille/
  File:        cam-21-pureus_booprookkakan.zip

  Title:       "Pure Me (dogs trix mix)"
  Authors:     Kakan (Original by Boop)
  File Size:   1M
  Source:      ftp://ftp.scene.org/pub/music/groups/camomille/
  File:        cam-21-pureus_booprookkakan.zip

                 --Ben Collver


--=--=--
--=--=------=--=------=--=----
  The Lineup
  By:  Novus
--=--=------=--=------=--=----

  Welcome to The Lineup! Every month, I scour through the hundreds of new
  releases on the scene's major archive sites to find the best new music,
  saving you the trouble of having to download 20 instant-delete songs to
  find 1 that's worth keeping.

  If you're so inclined, you can send your feedback on The Lineup to
  vince_young@hotmail.com. I get my share of compliments, but what I'd
  really find useful are some negative comments, believe it or not, e-mail
  from folks who find The Lineup to be a complete and utter waste of time.
  I'm not perfect, so I know you're out there somewhere. Let me know what's
  wrong so I can make it right!

  In the meantime, you may consider the following 17 tunes to be the best
  tracks of October 2003:


  -=- THE BEST OF THE BEST -=-
  "Transcended State" - LauriT - electronica
  http://www.modarchive.com/cgi-bin/download.cgi/L/lt_trans.it

  -=- THE REST OF THE BEST -=-
  "Beastmaster's Tale" - Badliz - orchestral
  http://www.modarchive.com/cgi-bin/download.cgi/B/bz_vio2_m.it

  "Dreams Of Hope 2" - Awesome - demostyle
  ftp://ftp.scene.org/pub/music/artists/awesome/aws_hop2.zip

  "Everclear" - Firestar - fantasy
  ftp://ftp.scene.org/pub/music/groups/mephtik/mephtik_3/firestar-everclear.zip

  "Fish 'n Chips" - Edzes - pop
  http://edzes.boomdrak.no/FNC.XM

  "For A New World 2" - Awesome - dance
  ftp://ftp.scene.org/pub/music/artists/awesome/aws_fan2.zip

  "Future Dreams" - Awesome - demostyle
  ftp://ftp.scene.org/pub/music/artists/awesome/aws_futu.zip

  "House" - Bt_me - trance
  http://www.modarchive.com/cgi-bin/download.cgi/B/bt_me_h.xm

  "Jelly Donut" - Supervillian23 - house
  http://www.doomsday-device.com/jellydonut.it

  "Mnemonics" - Eftos - electronica
  http://eftos.members.easyspace.com/eftos_mnemonics.zip

  "Pan Galactic Gargoyle Blaster" - Gargoyle - funk
  http://www.tunestore.de/songs/pggb.zip

  "Seeker Of Dreams" - Awesome - demostyle
  ftp://ftp.scene.org/pub/music/artists/awesome/aws_seek.rar

  "The Farewell" - Turkanen - fantasy
  http://www.mbnet.fi/~eska/t-farewe.it

  "The Last Cowboy" - Awesome - fantasy
  ftp://ftp.scene.org/pub/music/artists/awesome/aws_last.zip

  "The Space Overture" - Awesome - fantasy
  ftp://ftp.scene.org/pub/music/artists/awesome/aws_spac.zip

  "The Space Overture 2" - Awesome - fantasy
  ftp://ftp.scene.org/pub/music/artists/awesome/aws_spa2.zip

  "Two Souls At Once" - Dwight Jack - light rock
  http://digilander.libero.it/dwj/overcl/5-2sa1.zip

  Latez!

                 --Novus


--=--=--
--=--=------=--=------=--=----
  Screen Lit Vertigo
    "Retox" and "Feed Your Machine"
  By:  Seven
--=--=------=--=------=--=----

  -=- "Retox" by Mystic -=-

  (party-version)

  Found at www.scene.org
  1st place at the Mainframe Z003 demo compo

  System requirements: 11 MB HD, GeForce2MX or better.  Needs DirectX9 and the
    .NET framework

  Test Machine: P4 2.6GHz 512MB DDR, Realtek AC'97, NVidia 488 GO 64MB, WinXP

  The credits:
    Code: Geezer
    Graphics: Czar
    Music: Geezer

  The demo:
  Retox is the first PC demo of Mystic, an old Amiga group that has been
  hibernating since 1999.  Even though this is a two-man production (the
  rest of the group must be still asleep), it's very enjoyable, with a
  healthy supply of fresh effects.  One of those is a "particle" effect with
  3D lines instead of particles, creating spiky trees, spirals and other
  fractal-like forms.  The rapid twirling makes it look like a 3D version of
  Second Reality's famous rotating bars effect at times.  There's also a
  tower made of transparent pink polygons, that starts to curve and deform
  creating an almost kaleidoscopic effect, and another seldom-seen effect is
  the shadebob variant of metaballs, with the balls leaving a metallic tube
  behind as they move.

  Mystic has already learned a few PC tricks, such as Farbrauschs glow
  effect, although this copy is plagued by a visual glitch on the lower and
  right borders of the screen.  And there's a lovely ice-blue part with a
  glowing, half-smooth half-polygonized blob that's obviously inspired by
  Kewlers Variform.  On the other hand, I hope they realize their black
  backgrounds are very outdated, and even the occasional star field doesn't
  help much.

  There aren't any graphics, just a few run-of-the-mill textures, and a
  boring font.  Still, the effects look nice enough to make you forget about
  the lack of pictures.  There are a few 3D models, one double tunnel with
  holes in, rather angular for PC standards, and some spiky blobs.

  The music is a nice energetic electro-tune, starting slowly but growing
  more complex with time.  From the very start, you notice how well
  synchronized the demo is: the slowly rising intro fits perfectly with
  first uncurling blue particle effect, the group name appears letter for
  letter on the first twangs of the lead instrument, and this attention to
  details continues during the rest of the demo.  Especially the glow effect
  pulsating to the beats deserves kudos.

  Overall:
  I think Mystic's switch to the PC went pretty well, and this demo well
  worth checking out.  I hope they can improve their weak points (no
  backgrounds, no pictures, and only 1 effect at any time) while keeping
  their originality, good design and perfect music-syncing.  I'm already
  looking out for your next production, guys!


  -=- "Feed Your Machine" by Faktory -=-

  (party-version)

  Found at www.scene.org
  11th place at the Assembly 2003 combined demo compo

  System requirements: 12.7 MB HD, Win9X, fast CPU recommended

  Test Machines:
        P3 900 640MB, Gamesurround 3, Radeon 8500 LE 64MB, Win98 SE
             (some parts very slow, and crashes when quitting the demo)
        P4 2.6GHz 512MB DDR, Realtek AC'97, NVidia 488 GO 64MB, WinXP
             (works OK)

  The credits:
    Code: Rawhed, Uttumuttu
    Graphics: Degrysin, Reverie, Rawhed, Rich Hancock
    Music: Squeek

  The demo:
  Summer is over, and the stream of releases has mostly dried up.  This
  gives me the perfect excuse to dig up some old releases that didn't reach
  a high place in a compo, but that I still liked personally.  :)  And it's
  quite obvious why I like Feed Your Machine/Factory: I'm a coder, and this
  demo is very much a coders demo: plenty of original effects, albeit at the
  expense of design and other such (for coders) trivialities.

  My favorite effects are the smoke/fluid algorithms: there's a 2D smoke
  effect at the start, rather coarse but with realistic curling vortices,
  there's a field of frozen blue/red particles that slowly start to twirl in
  blurred patterns, and a full 3D smoke simulation in a cube at the end,
  with puffs of smoke appearing at the bottom, raising quickly only to curve
  downwards when hitting the ceiling.  You can see the individual voxels if
  you look closely, but even at this limited resolution the amount of
  calculations must be pretty huge.

  Another recurring class of effects is collision detection: from the single
  mad cube dashing through a neatly ordered stack of his colleagues,
  scattering them everywhere, over a puppet falling realistically on the
  ground, to the collection of cubes, skulls, knots etc that fall on and
  over each other (with shadows, and rubber-vector look-alike post-
  processing!)

  Other parts worth mentioning are the fur-rendered dog (doesn't look quite
  like real hair but more like a toy dogs fur), a meta-ball effect morphing
  between a cube, a knot, and a skull, and an interesting 2D distortion
  filter.

  If you are wondering why this splendid piece of code didn't attract more
  votes at Assembly, you only need to look at the (lack of) design.  Lots of
  objects are flat-shaded, and have ugly contrasting colors.  At some points
  a transparent green equalizer is shown shortly at the edges of the screen,
  but it doesn't look too good and should have been left out IMHO.  There's
  no coherence between the different parts, some parts are too short and
  others too long.  There's a nice Faktory logo, and an OK head picture, but
  the other images seem to be stock photos photoshopped to have strange
  colors.

  The music is an .IT, which is still smaller then the corresponding Ogg so
  the size-optimizing part of my personality is glad with that :) The track
  is quite industrial, very noisy with a few interruptions where the slow
  melancholic lead (an organ?) comes to the foreground.  It's not really my
  style of music, too monotone IMHO, and the syncing is overdone at points
  (ugly white flashes)

  Overall:
  The info file contains these credits: "design: uttumuttu & rawhed, we
  rule!! and apologize!! and need a really good designer!!" I can only agree
  :) Coders and design go together like cows and rocket science.  If you're
  a coder, you should watch Feed Your Machine to get some inspiration on
  what to do with the ever-increasing amount of CPU/FPU/GPU cycles.  But
  people with a delicate taste in colors better stay away from this one.

                 --Seven



--=--=--
--=--=------=--=------=--=----
  Coplan's Eyes
    A New Challenge
  By:  Coplan
--=--=------=--=------=--=----

  -=- Introduction -=-
  Every once in a while, I have to stand back and look at the demoscene.
  The past, present and future of the demoscene is an ever-changing pool of
  water and oil.  I've been here a while, though not as long as many.  But
  I've been here long enough to be able to characterize the scene.  What was
  a problem back then is a problem now and is a problem that we will face in
  the future: Change.  Change happens, and it always will.  Some embrace
  change, some fight it.  Sometimes it happens for the best, and sometimes
  it causes all sorts of problems.

  Since I jumped into the demoscene, I've seen much change.  The OS of
  choice used to be DOS.  Now it's Windows.  Maybe some day it will be Linux
  or even MacOS.  It used to be Fast Tracker vs. Impulse Tracker.  Now it's
  Buzz vs.  Renoise vs.  Psycle vs. whoever else wants to contend.  ANSI
  used to be popular, now its not.  2d used to be good enough.  3d pixel art
  was better.  Now, 3d models are almost necessary.  Size used to be the
  sign of skill.  Now quality and the exceptional use of OpenGL or DirectX
  is the sign of a great programmer.  Samples, which used to be in, are now
  out.  Soft-synths and MIDI are in.  And never mind the whole debate about
  music format.  Even I jumped into that debate more often than I should
  have.

  I repeat:  Change Happens.  As a person in my position, I feel as though I
  need to remind people of this every so often.  I do not claim to be the
  all-knowing observer of the scene.  It is too vast of a territory to fully
  understand from one perspective.  But I am wise, and I have many
  acquaintances.  And I have formed a pretty good, general picture of the
  scene.  And I know where people best fit.  So I am going to offer a new
  challenge to the community that is vastly known as the Demoscene.  And I
  use that term in the broadest sense of the word.  I don't want to limit
  myself to any aspect, any media, any operating system, or anything else.
  I want to be broad in my challenge.

  -=- Goals -=-
  You need to pick a goal, and work towards that goal.  It is very self-
  defeating to limit yourself to one program or one technique.  That's like
  painting a panorama with three colors.  It can be done, with the right
  three colors and patience.  But your goal is not to mix the pain, your
  goal is to paint the panorama.  Having lots of colors makes your goal
  easier to attain.  But, again, it depends on what your goal is.  Perhaps
  your goal is to limit yourself to three colors.  Well, have at it.  That's
  going to be a rewarding challenge.

  A goal is very simple to figure out.  It may have a time limit, it may
  not.  But the important thing about picking a goal is to work towards that
  goal.  Set a goal, and make a plan.  Your goal may be to write a song so
  that it can be entered into Competition X.  The time limit alone will help
  you stay on track.  It will also be a bit of a quality control as well.
  There's no challenge to falling in last place.  But there is quite a bit
  of a challenge in trying to do well.  Competition brings out the best in
  everyone.  But sometimes your goal isn't time oriented.  You might want to
  write a remix of a popular tune.  But since you are doing it for your own
  benefit, there is no time constraint.  This is where the plan is
  important.  You may have to set milestones for yourself -- mini goals, so
  to speak.  The easiest way to set a milestone is to set time limits for
  yourself.  If you don't have constraints, you won't reach your goal.

  I have one caveat about goals.  Sometimes it is actually beneficial to
  have an unattainable goal.  This seems a bit misconstrued, but it's
  actually just an intended misstatement.  True, you may not reach that
  goal.  But in actuality, your goal is just to work towards that
  unattainable goal.  This is what promotes learning.  You may want to learn
  anything and everything about a given topic.  That's never going to
  happen, but you'll learn as much as you possibly can along the way.  I
  have a symphony that I've been working on since I was 15.  I want to rival
  the works of Beethoven and Mozart.  That will never happen, but I am
  constantly reworking the symphony, and I'm constantly updating the sound
  samples.  I've ported the symphony 3 times now, and I still don't think
  I'll ever release it.  But I've learned quite a bit about harmonics and
  dynamics of a classical concerto in the process.  It's helped to improve
  my other music tremendously.  So this symphony has become a learning tool,
  nothing else.

  -=- Learn -=-
  The status quo is far too easy to accept.  It is much easier to do things
  the way you've always done them simply because you know how.  This is the
  reason why many people (and I'm guilty of this as well) cling to legacy
  programs based on an OS that doesn't even exist anymore.  This is why
  people cling to their old hardware just so they can do what they want to
  do.  Now, before I go on, I have to redirect for a moment.  Doing things
  the old way may be desirable.  It might be fun for you to mess in that
  legacy program.  We have whole scenes within the all-encompassing
  demoscene that focus on old hardware.  The Amiga and C64 scenes thrive on
  this aspect.  But that's the point, is it not?  The point is to pull more
  out of obsolete hardware.  But if that isn't your goal, then it never
  hurts to learn what's out there, at least.  If your intent is to make the
  absolute best model of a human you've ever done, then the old legacy
  modeling programs might not cut it.  Look into the latest technology.  And
  that holds true with almost anything.

  The point of learning is to acquire the understanding necessary to
  complete your task, or in our case your goal.  Leonardo da Vinci, a true
  renaissance man, explored many aspects of the world:  Physics, anatomy,
  theology, literature, history, etc.  What he learned enabled him to pain,
  design structures and understand the world in ways yet unimaginable;
  especially for his time.  Art students in college are often required to
  take Anatomy courses to better understand how the body works.  A musician
  might be required hours upon hours of music theory and music appreciation
  to understand what makes a song aesthetically pleasing.  And while this
  may all be fill, it is necessary to complete the task that is expected of
  them.

  The same goes for you, Joe Scener.  You might be a programmer specializing
  in OpenGL.  OpenGL is evolving before our eyes, and the hardware that
  supports it is ever changing as well.  The envelope is constantly being
  pushed.  If you expect to be a good programmer, you really need to keep up
  with the times, as they are changing.  Musicians face an even more
  daunting task.  As audio technology gets better and better every year,
  more software comes out to support it and you almost have to re-learn your
  skills to keep up.  Your goal is to create great and aesthetic music.  The
  new technology makes this goal that much easier to reach, but for what
  cost?  The time it takes you to learn the new technology?  That's hardly a
  penalty, in my eyes.  It's a difficult step to make, but it isn't
  unrealistic.  If it were your career, you'd have to do it or you'd lose
  your job.  I think that says enough.  Fortunately for you, new software
  tends to be based on the old software, so it isn't always that difficult
  to learn.

  -=- Observation & Criticism -=-
  Observation is a difficult thing to accomplish - but it is essential to do
  any task correctly.  Infants develop mobile skills and language skills
  through observation of their parents and other elders around them.
  Separate a newborn from human contact, and he'll imitate whatever is
  available.  Remember Tarzan?  Right.  Observation is a very broad term,
  however, and it needs to be taken into consideration relative to the task
  at hand.  It is very easy to look at a picture and say "That's a house" -
  whereas it is the sign of a true observer to notice the details of that
  house.  But observation isn't about noticing details.  It's about noticing
  the right details.  And finding these details is about knowing what to
  look for.  Context is always necessary.  If at all possible, you'll want
  to gather information prior to making an observation.  What is the intent
  of the work?  Answer that question, and you know what details you need to
  look for.

  One can learn from observation very well.  But in order to truly expand
  ones horizons, one needs to consider criticism.  Criticism is a direct
  derivative of observation, but you will not grow as an artist, programmer,
  musician or whatever without criticism.  It's easy enough to observe your
  own work, but it's not always easy to criticize it.  This is something
  that most humans have difficult with.  We tend to either be too critical
  or not critical enough when it comes to our own.  Too critical can be
  destructive.  An artist may delete some of his work simply because he
  believes it to be of poor quality, although it could have been a start
  into something potentially very good.  Not critical enough is the reason
  why an artist may not work very hard on a given song.  Things are "good
  enough".  It is always a difficult balance, but finding that happy medium
  between passive and self-mutilation is important.

  It is also a very important skill to learn how to take criticism.  You
  should be well aware by now that everyone has very different opinions.  If
  you tried to follow everyone's advice, you wouldn't get anywhere.  In
  fact, you'll probably find you revert back to one version or another
  repeatedly.  No one is ever going to agree on everything, so face the
  facts:  You can't please everyone.  You need to take another look at your
  goals, and only take the criticism that aligns with that goal.  You'll end
  up not using a good portion of the criticism.  While that seems bad, it's
  really not.  Your goal needs to be reached, and the criticism has to be
  something you agree with.

  Now, criticism has its place and you need to learn to be accepting of it.
  Most often, someone will point out something you hadn't thought of, or
  realized.  Obviously, this is very useful information.  Maybe you can
  tighten up your work a bit more and correct some of the mistakes.  Other
  times, such criticism might be purely objective, and you can dismiss that
  if you disagree.  But don't disagree too often.  It's not wise to ignore
  what another person might contribute.  Even the negative comments need to
  be considered.  But consider everything, and take it with a grain of salt.

  -=- Balance -=-
  Life is a complicated stream of events.  Some parts are up, some down.
  Some are fast, and some are slow.  Inevitably, your hobby has to fit in
  there somewhere.  Now, I've written many articles on this very topic in
  the past, so I will touch lightly on it this time.  Besides, I could go on
  for several pages about how to balance your life, and you still wouldn't
  understand what to do next.  But rather than inundate you with excessive
  amounts of information, it's probably best that I just make you aware that
  you need to have balance in your life.  This is much easier said than
  done, especially when you start getting other people involved.  But in
  order for you to be skilled in your craft, you need to have enough time to
  practice, experiment and learn.  Without that, you have nothing.  But in
  turn, if you don't balance your hobby's time with the other aspects of
  your life, you'll end up falling behind in something - and an unbalanced
  mind is an unproductive mind.  In turn, you'll get nowhere without the
  focus necessary for your hobby.

  -=- Experiment -=-
  This topic could very easily fit under "Learn", but I have separated it
  out for a very important reason.  Experimentation helps you maintain a
  broad scope and a narrow focus.  Experimentation allows us to sample many
  different mediums, genres, styles and techniques without holding us to any
  one form.  It goes without saying that there will be a lot of productions
  abandoned.  But nothing goes to waste.  Every failed experiment makes the
  completed production that much better in quality.  You learn something
  from every mistake, from every trial and from every incomplete production.
  Especially if you are a coder, you can easily borrow something from
  previous failures, literally.  But experimentation helps you to achieve
  the focus and desire to carry on.  The only way to answer the question of
  "what if?" is to do it.  If you dislike the outcome, now you know.  If you
  enjoy some aspect of the outcome, it helps you to expand on what you
  already know.  Who knows, you may even stumble upon something entirely
  new.  And that makes all the failed experiments seem worthwhile.
  Experiment often.

  -=- Enjoy -=-
  Most of all, you want to have fun.  A hobby is not a hobby unless it is at
  least somewhat enjoyable.  If you're not enjoying something, try to figure
  out why.  Maybe your technique is flawed.  Maybe you just need a new
  technique.  Or, sadly, maybe you picked the wrong hobby.  As I said, a
  hobby is meant to be enjoyable.  This is where you have to be selfish.
  You might be very good at something...but if you don't have fun doing it,
  it's not really worth it.  If you have tried and you can't figure out any
  way to make it enjoyable for yourself, don't do it.  You may disappoint
  some people.  But they're not you.  You need to be happy.

  -=- Conclusion -=-
  Well, all the details are set now.  I have given you a template and some
  things to think about.  Hopefully, each aspect that I have already
  discussed has you thinking.  I'm hoping that you have a broader, more
  clear outlook on your contributions to the scene.  But I have to pull it
  all together in a clean cut challenge that capitalizes. everything that I
  have spoken about today.  I gave you the "how?", but now I provide the
  "what?":

  As a member of the community broadly known as the demoscene, I challenge
  you to improve yourself as an individual and a contributor to the
  demoscene.  I challenge you to expand your horizons and become a
  specialist in your chosen aspect.  Only through self improvement are you
  able to help improve the demoscene as it stands today.  Your
  contributions, no matter how small, will affect the community in some way,
  no matter how minimal.  But a lot of small contributions amounts to a
  large percentage of the demoscene.  The demoscene thrives on contribution,
  it needs it.  So share your ideas, spread your work and grow with the
  community.  Grow and, in turn, challenge the rest of us.  Help us to grow
  with you, and we'll help you to grow more.

                 --Coplan


--=--=--
--=--=------=--=------=--=----
  Link List
--=--=------=--=------=--=----

    Portals:

        SceneSpot (Home of Static Line).......http://www.scenespot.org
        CFXweb.......................................http://cfxweb.net
        Czech Scene................................http://www.scene.cz
        Danish Scene..............................http://demo-scene.dk
        Demoscene.org.........................http://www.demoscene.org
        Demo.org...................................http://www.demo.org
        Diskmag.de...................................http://diskmag.de
        Greek Scene............................http://www.demoscene.gr
        Hungarian Scene........................http://www.demoscene.hu
        Italian Scene...........................http://run.to/la_scena
        Kahvi.....................................http://www.kahvi.org
        ModPlug Central Resources..........http://www.castlex.com/mods
        Noerror.................................http://www.noerror.org
        Norwegian Scene........................http://www.demoscene.no
        Orange Juice.............................http://www.ojuice.net
        Planet Zeus..........................http://www.planetzeus.net
        Polish Scene...............................http://www.scene.pl
        Pouet.net.................................http://www.pouet.net
        Russian Scene..........................http://www.demoscene.ru
        Scene.org.................................http://www.scene.org
        Scenergy on-line (8bit)............http://www.scenergy.natm.ru
        Scenet....................................http://www.scenet.de
        Spanish Scene............................http://www.escena.org
        Swiss Scene..............................http://www.chscene.ch
        United Trackers.................http://www.united-trackers.org

    Archives:

        Acid2.....................................ftp://acid2.stack.nl
        Amber.......................................ftp://amber.bti.pl
        Aminet.....................http://wuarchive.wustl.edu/~aminet/
        Cyberbox.....................................ftp://cyberbox.de
        Hornet (1992-1996)........................ftp://ftp.hornet.org
        MOD Archive..........................http://www.modarchive.com
    <*> Music Massage......................http://www.scene.cz/massage
        Scene.org..................................ftp://ftp.scene.org
        Scene.org Austra........................ftp://ftp.au.scene.org
        Scene.org Netherlands...................ftp://ftp.nl.scene.org
        Swiss Scene FTP...........................ftp://ftp.chscene.ch

    Demo Groups:

        3g Design..............................http://3gdesign.cjb.net
        3State...................................http://threestate.com
        7 Gods.........................................http://7gods.sk
        Aardbei.....................................http://aardbei.com
        Acid Rain..............................http://surf.to/acidrain
        Addict..................................http://addict.scene.pl
        Agravedict........................http://www.agravedict.art.pl
        Alien Prophets.....................http://www.alienprophets.dk
        Anakata..............................http://www.anakata.art.pl
        ASD....................................http://asd.demoscene.gr
        Astral..............................http://astral.scene-hu.com
        Astroidea........................http://astroidea.scene-hu.com
        BlaBla..............................http://blabla.planet-d.net
        Blasphemy..............................http://www.blasphemy.dk
        Bomb..................................http://bomb.planet-d.net
        Broncs..................................http://broncs.scene.cz
        Byterapers.....................http://www.byterapers.scene.org
        Bypass.................................http://bypass.scene.org
        Calodox.................................http://www.calodox.org
        Cocoon..............................http://cocoon.planet-d.net
        Confine.................................http://www.confine.org
        Damage...................................http://come.to/damage
        Dc5.........................................http://www.dc5.org
        Delirium..............................http://delirium.scene.pl
        Eclipse............................http://www.eclipse-game.com
        Elitegroup..........................http://elitegroup.demo.org
        Exceed...........................http://www.inf.bme.hu/~exceed
        Fairlight.............................http://www.fairlight.com
        Fobia Design...........................http://www.fd.scene.org
        Freestyle............................http://www.freestylas.org
        Fresh! Mindworks...................http://kac.poliod.hu/~fresh
        Future Crew..........................http://www.futurecrew.org
        Fuzzion.................................http://www.fuzzion.org
        GODS...................................http://www.idf.net/gods
        Halcyon...........................http://www.halcyon.scene.org
        Haujobb..................................http://www.haujobb.de
        Hellcore............................http://www.hellcore.art.pl
        Infuse...................................http://www.infuse.org
        Inquisition....................http://inquisition.demoscene.hu
        Kilobite...............................http://kilobite.cjb.net
        Kolor................................http://www.kaoz.org/kolor
        Komplex.................................http://www.komplex.org
        Kooma.....................................http://www.kooma.com
        Mandula.........................http://www.inf.bme.hu/~mandula
        Maturefurk...........................http://www.maturefurk.com
        Monar................ftp://amber.bti.pl/pub/scene/distro/monar
        MOVSD....................................http://movsd.scene.cz
        Nextempire...........................http://www.nextempire.com
        Noice.....................................http://www.noice.org
        Orange.................................http://orange.scene.org
        Orion................................http://orion.planet-d.net
        Outbreak................................http://www.outbreak.nu
        Popsy Team............................http://popsyteam.rtel.fr
        Prone................................http://www.prone.ninja.dk
        Purple....................................http://www.purple.dk
        Rage........................................http://www.rage.nu
        Replay.......................http://www.shine.scene.org/replay
        Retro A.C...........................http://www.retroac.cjb.net
        Sista Vip..........................http://www.sistavip.exit.de
        Skytech team............................http://www.skytech.org
        Skrju.....................................http://www.skrju.org
        Spinning Kids......................http://www.spinningkids.org
        Sunflower.......................http://sunflower.opengl.org.pl
        Talent.............................http://talent.eurochart.org
        The Black Lotus.............................http://www.tbl.org
        The Digital Artists Wired Nation.http://digitalartists.cjb.net
        The Lost Souls...............................http://www.tls.no
        TPOLM.....................................http://www.tpolm.com
        Trauma.................................http://sauna.net/trauma
        T-Rex.....................................http://www.t-rex.org
        Unik........................................http://www.unik.de
        Universe..........................http://universe.planet-d.net
        Vantage..................................http://www.vantage.ch
        Wipe....................................http://www.wipe-fr.org

    Music Labels, Music Sites:

        Aisth.....................................http://www.aisth.com
        Aural Planet........................http://www.auralplanet.com
        Azure...................................http://azure-music.com
        Blacktron Music Production...........http://www.d-zign.com/bmp
        BrothomStates.............http://www.katastro.fi/brothomstates
        Chill..........................http://www.chillproductions.com
        Chippendales......................http://www.sunpoint.net/~cnd
        Chiptune...............................http://www.chiptune.com
        Da Jormas................................http://www.jormas.com
        Fabtrax......http://www.cyberverse.com/~boris/fabtrax/home.htm
        Fairlight Music.....................http://fairlight.scene.org
        Five Musicians.........................http://www.fm.scene.org
        Fusion Music Crew.................http://members.home.nl/cyrex
        Goodstuff..........................http://artloop.de/goodstuff
        Hellven.................................http://www.hellven.org
        Ignorance.............................http://www.ignorance.org
        Immortal Coil.............................http://www.ic.l7.net
        Intense...........................http://intense.ignorance.org
        Jecoute.................................http://jecoute.cjb.net
        Kosmic Free Music Foundation.............http://www.kosmic.org
        Lackluster.....................http://www.m3rck.net/lackluster
        Level-D.................................http://www.level-d.com
        Mah Music.............................http://come.to/mah.music
        Maniacs of noise...............http://home.worldonline.nl/~mon
        MAZ's sound homepage..................http://www.maz-sound.com
        Med.......................................http://www.med.fr.fm
        Miasmah.............................http://www.miasmah.cjb.net
        Milk.......................................http://milk.sgic.fi
        Mo'playaz..........................http://ssmedion.de/moplayaz
        Mono211.................................http://www.mono211.com
        Morbid Minds..............http://www.raveordie.com/morbidminds
        Moods..............................http://www.moodymusic.de.vu
        Mstation.....................http://mstation.org/software.html
        Nectarine Demoscene Radio................http://scenemusic.net
        Noise................................http://www.noisemusic.org
        One Touch Records......................http://otr.planet-d.net
        Park..................................http://park.planet-d.net
        pHluid..................................http://phluid.acid.org
        Radical Rhythms.....http://www.andrew.cmu.edu/user/merrelli/rr
        RBi Music.............................http://www.rbi-music.com
        Ruff Engine................http://members.xoom.com/ruff_engine
        SHR8M......................................http://1st.to/shr8m
        Sound Devotion................http://sugarbomb.x2o.net/soundev
        Soundstate.........................http://listen.to/soundstate
        Sunlikamelo-D.....................http://www.sunlikamelo-d.com
        Suspect Records........................http://www.tande.com/sr
        Tequila........................http://www.defacto2.net/tequila
        Tempo................................http://tempomusic.cjb.net
        Tetris....................................http://msg.sk/tetris
        Theralite...........................http://theralite.avalon.hr
        Tokyo Dawn Records........................http://tokyodawn.org
        Triad's C64 music archive.............http://www.triad.c64.org
        UltraBeat.........................http://www.innerverse.com/ub
        Vibrants................................http://www.vibrants.dk
        Zen of Tracking.........................http://surf.to/the-imm

    Programming:

        3D engines..........http://cg.cs.tu-berlin.de/~ki/engines.html
        3D programming portal.................http://www.3dgamedev.com
        Documents...............http://www.neutralzone.org/home/faqsys
        File format collection...................http://www.wotsit.org
        Game programming portal...............http://www.gamasutra.com
        LCC (free C compiler).........http://www.remcomp.com/lcc-win32
    <U> NASM (free Assembly compiler)......http://nasm.sourceforge.net
        Programming portal......................http://www.gamedev.net
        Programming portal.....................http://www.flipcode.com
        Programming portal......................http://www.exaflop.org
        Programming portal............http://www.programmersheaven.com
        Programming portal.....................http://www.freecode.com
        PTC video engine.........................http://www.gaffer.org

    Magazines:

    <U> Amber (in pop-up window).............http://amber.planet-d.net
        Amnesia...............http://amnesia-dist.future.easyspace.com
        Demojournal....................http://demojournal.planet-d.net
        Eurochart.............................http://www.eurochart.org
        Hugi........................................http://www.hugi.de
    <U> Jurassic Pack.......................http://www.jurassicpack.de
    <U> PAiN.....................................http://pain.scene.org
    <U> Shine (in pop-up window)................http://shine.scene.org
    <U> Static Line....................http://staticline.scenespot.org
        Sunray..............................http://sunray.planet-d.net
        TUHB.......................................http://www.tuhb.org
        WildMag..................................http://www.wildmag.de

    Parties:

        Assembly (Finland).....................http://www.assembly.org
        Ambience (The Netherlands)..............http://www.ambience.nl
    <*> Breakpoint (Germany)..........http://breakpoint.untergrund.net
        Buenzli (Switzerland)......................http://www.buenz.li
        Dreamhack (Sweden)....................http://www.dreamhack.org
        Gravity (Poland)............http://www.demoscena.cp.pl/gravity
        Mekka-Symposium (Germany)...................http://ms.demo.org
        Pilgrimage (Utah, US)..............http://pilgrimage.scene.org
        ReAct (Greece).............................http://www.react.gr
        Takeover (The Netherlands).............,http://www.takeover.nl
        The Party (Denmark).....................http://www.theparty.dk

    Others:

    <*> CoolBPM.....................................http://coolbpm.com
        Demo secret parts....http://www.inf.bme.hu/~mandula/secret.txt
        Textmode Demo Archive.................http://tmda.planet-d.net
        Arf!Studios..........................http://www.arfstudios.org
        #coders..................................http://coderz.cjb.net
        Csound-tekno e-mail list......................................
           ............http://plot.bek.no/mailman/listinfo/csoundtekno
        Demonews Express.........http://www.teeselink.demon.nl/express
        Demo fanclub........................http://jerware.org/fanclub
        Digital Undergrounds.....................http://dug.iscool.net
        Everything tracking..http://zolaweb.com/Zola/trax/tracking.htm
        Freax.....................................http://www.freax.hu/
        GFXZone.................................http://www.gfxzone.org
        Mod-Radio.....................http://www.back2roots.org/Radio/
        PC-demos explained.....http://www.oldskool.org/demos/explained
        Pixel...................................http://pixel.scene.org
        #trax e-mail list.............................................
           .............http://www.scenespot.org/mailman/listinfo/trax
        Underground Mine.............http://www.spinningkids.org/umine

    IRC Channels:

        Graphics.........................................ircnet #pixel
        Graphics (French)..............................ircnet #pixelfr
        Music......................................irc.scene.org #trax
        Music.............................................ircnet #trax
        Programming.....................................ircnet #coders
        Programming....................................efnet #flipcode
        Programming (French)............................ircnet #codefr
        Programming (German)........................ircnet #coders.ger
        Programming (Hungarian)......................ircnet #coders.hu
        Scene.........................................ircnet #thescene
        Scene (French)..................................ircnet #demofr
        Scene (Hungarian)............................ircnet #demoscene
        Zx-spectrum scene..................................ircnet #z80

--=--=--
----=--=------=--=------=--=------=--=------=--=------=--=------=--=------


  -=- Staff -=-

    Editors:         Ciaran / Ciaran Hamilton / staticline@theblob.org
                     Ben / Ben Collver / collver1@comcast.net
    Staff Writers:   Coplan / D. Travis North / coplan@scenespot.org
                      Dilvie / Eric Hamilton / dilvie@dilvie.com
                      Novus / Vince Young / vince_young@hotmail.com
                      Psitron / Tim Soderstrom / tigerhawk@stic.net
                      Setec / Jesper Pederson / jesped@post.tele.dk
                      Seven / Stefaan VanNieuwenhuyze / seven7@pandora.be
                      Tryhuk / Tryhuk Vojtech / vojtech.tryhuk@worldonline.cz
                      Vill / Brian Frank / darkvill@yahoo.com
                      The Watcher / Paul-Jan Pauptit / sprout@zonnet.nl

  The current issue of Static Line can always be found on the Web at:
    http://staticline.scenespot.org/issues/current_issue

  Static Line Subscription Management:
    http://www.scenespot.org/mailman/listinfo/static_line

  If you would like to contribute an article to Static Line, be aware that
  we will format your article to 76 columns with two columns at the
  beginning of each line.  Please avoid foul language and high ASCII
  characters.  Contributions (Plain Text) should be e-mailed to
  (static_line-owner@scenespot.org) by the last Friday of each month.  New
  issues are released on a monthly basis.

  See you next month!
-eof---=------=--=------=--=--