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                       cRu|________\     |    |                  Issue #49
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 October, 2003                           ||    /  \ \__/   /   /   /___// |
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--=--=--
--=--=------=--=------=--=----
  Table Of Contents
--=--=------=--=------=--=----
     Opening:
        Message From the Editor
        Letters From Our Readers
     Features:
        Party Report -- Buenzli '03
        Modes
        Build A MIDI System
     Reviews:
        Music:
           In Tune -- "Decomposing Angels" by Matt Pollard
           On The Sideline -- "Unnamed" and "Xor Life, 0xFF" by Salice
           The Lineup -- Monthly Music Listings
        Demo:
           Screen Lit Vertigo --
              "Ninja in a Box", "Weltenkonstrukt", and "85 Dollars"
     Link List: Get Somewhere in the Scene
     Closing: Staff and Contact Information


--=--=--
--=--=------=--=------=--=----
  Message From the Editor
--=--=------=--=------=--=----

  Hello!

  Ciaran here. I've been back from my holiday for quite a few weeks now, and
  yes, it was very nice, thanks for asking. :D Of course, as always happens,
  my mailbox (my personal one, not the Static Line one) filled up with tons
  of emails. But that's all sorted now, which is good. :)

  This month, Seven brings us a party report from Buenzli '03, Dilvie
  continues his music theory column from last month with an article on
  modes, and Coplan talks about building your own MIDI system. We also have
  the usual suspects: In Tune, On The Sideline, The Lineup and Screen Lit
  Vertigo all make their regular appearances again this month.

  If you haven't been to the site recently, check it out:
  http://staticline.scenespot.org/ . Coplan recently designed a new style
  for it, which Ben and I like. It's certainly better than what we had
  before. :D

  One last thing; if you're interested to see how the "Millenium 2003" party
  went, take a look at http://www.mln.scenosaurus.org/en/mln2k3rep.html .
  It has quite a lot of photos from the party, and makes pretty interesting
  viewing.

  Enjoy the issue!

                 --Ciaran


--=--=--
--=--=------=--=------=--=----
  Letters From Our Readers
--=--=------=--=------=--=----

  -=- A Message from TS -=-

  Hello,

  thanks for another issue of static line! Especially the evoke report was
  nice, especially since I intended going there first.  Now, with all its
  details I was at least able to catch a small part of the atmosphere there
  =)

  The pilgrimage reports were different, at least if you're used to middle
  european parties. But it's interesting to see the north american scene
  rebooting, would be nice if they can establish some well-known groups and
  productions again.

  At first, I wondered why the current issue had far less tunes in The
  Lineup. But then I noticed that the last one was a double-month issue, so
  no summer hole is going on *happy listening*

  This time, both "In Tune"s were also included in The Lineup. Was this
  intended, or is it just coincidencial? ;)

  So much for this time...

  Greets,

                 --T$


  -=- Reply from Ciaran -=-

  Hi TS,

  Thanks for your email; it's always nice to know we're appreciated. :)

  Regarding the fact that both of the tunes in "In Tune" appeared in "The
  Lineup" last month; it wasn't actually a coincidence, although it would
  have been pretty cool if it had been. :D Coplan had been looking for songs
  to review, and asked Novus for his draft of The Lineup, from which he then
  picked two songs to review.

  Good spotting, though. :D Thanks for reading!

                 --Ciaran


--=--=--
--=--=------=--=------=--=----
  Party Report
    Buenzli '03
  By:  Seven
--=--=------=--=------=--=----

  -=- Friday 29 August -=-
  Lacking the services of my personal chauffeur Djefke, I had to go to
  Switzerland by train.  I left around noon in Belgium, and arrived in
  Winterthur after 21 o'clock, having slept most of the time.  I left the
  station and realized 2 things: I had forgotten to exchange money, unlike
  the other countries I've been to recently Switzerland is not part of the
  European union so Euros are no use here.  :( Second, I hadn't written down
  the address of the party place on paper.  Luckily I had saved some pages
  from the Buenzli web site on my laptop, and luckily the "Liebestrasse 3"
  address was on them somewhere.  A small Winterthur map nicked from the
  tourist info office was all I needed to get lost a few times before
  finding the Kirchgemeindehaus (Church community building) that was the new
  location of Buenzli.  The party place was a huge monumental building, but
  there was nobody at the entrance.  I followed the "Buenzli" signs through
  the empty entrance hall, to the huge stone staircase to the second floor,
  where I found the info desk just before the main hall.  I gave the other
  part of my combi ticket, got a vote key and went inside.

  22:16:
  The main hall is huge and very classy, with a polished wooden floor, a big
  podium with a giant church organ in the back, and a balcony above the main
  floor with three rows of chairs for people who want to watch the compos
  from above.  Between the podium and the projector there is a small open
  area where the tables have been replaces with a carpet, benches and
  pillows.  It's the chill-out area, but sometimes pillow fights break out
  so it's not that peaceful.  :) Melwyn is sitting there with the Calodox
  guys (and girl), he's trying to show a game he programmed for his mobile
  phone (Summer Sports IIRC) in between the fights.  Behind the projector is
  a row tables for the orgos, I see Fred and Unlock hard at work there.

  Since it's too late to change money in a bank, I swap some Euros for
  francs with Melwyn, so I can try out the "pizza buenzli" that's being sold
  in the party place, one amongst with a choice of unhealthy fast food
  items.  :) It tastes OK, but eating near the chill-out area proves to be
  dangerous with the low-flying pillows.

  The big screen is larger then at Evoke or even Breakpoint, and currently
  Amiga demos are shown, with the usual party info in between.

  22:40:
  The opening ceremony should have started at 22.00, so far nothing yet...
  I went to the orgos to ask what the network settings should be, but their
  network guy has disappeared.  Everything should work with automatic DHCP,
  though, and it does indeed.  :) When I try to register at the party
  intranet I can't find my vote key anymore, but I can get a new one from
  the info desk without hassles.  Phew!  Unlike at Evoke, the network has a
  gateway, so I can read Slashdot and my other favorite web sites when
  nothing is scheduled (or delayed. :) )

  23:08:
  There's a DJ playing, with winamp plugins or so on the big screen.  Tciny
  uses my laptop to get the infamous Bronix video from scene.org and shows
  it to Koyote, who's also doing his third party in one month.

  23:58:
  The opening ceremony has started, but the orgos need to change the frame
  rate so the projector doesn't switch to a lower video resolution.  There's
  a montage of previous Buenzli-flashes, and Unlock welcomes everyone.  Next
  the Scene.org awards video is shown, I'm glad I can finally see it after
  missing the ceremony at Breakpoint.  I find Dixan/Spinning Kids, using the
  chill-out area as intended: simply lying flat on his back and watching the
  big screen.

  The rules for the surprise compo: you can do whatever you want (music,
  picture, demo, video,..) as long as it contains these three elements: a
  cow (the Buenzli mascotte), an organ (from inside the party hall),  and a
  parking lot (as the orgos have found a nearby parking area where you can
  stay the entire weekend for 10 Euros).

  -=- Saturday 30 August -=-
  1:20:
  The big screen is showing all kinds of demos, from the very recent and
  famous (Zoom3, I Feel Like A Computer) to the more oldskool ones
  (Zilog/Sunflower, various Nooon demos, Tpolm classics,...).

  I'm working on some tools (again), there are some boring things that need
  to be coded and I usually delay and avoid such code as long as possible,
  but here surrounded by sceners I feel I have enough inspiration to finish
  them.

  At 2:30, the kitchen closes as the cook has to sleep, and not long after
  that I follow his example.

  8:47:
  I'm awake again, since an organizer is hammering at a wooden construction
  on the podium.  After a while it turns out to be an arena to play Whacky
  Wheels live, one of the fun compos at Buenzli.  Maybe I had slept longer
  in the sleeping area in the basement, but I was too lazy to go there
  tonight.  :(

  10:54:
  Shifter has arrived with his girlfriend Zania, he's installing his shuttle
  PC next to me.  The big screen shows Amour/Orion, the demo that won
  Buenzli last year, and Zania loves it so Shifter shows Easter Egge/Orion
  and other funny French demos.

  The Whacky Wheels compo still needs 8 more players before it can start.

  11.34:
  The Whacky Wheels compo is running, participants needs to play two by two
  with direct elimination.  You need to drive a small RC car through a maze
  of cardboard boxes and wooden ramps, but it's easy to get stuck or land
  upside down after a jump from a ramp.  You need to drive three laps, but
  points are also given for style.  The whole race is filmed, and shown on
  the big screen with the orignal chippy game music.  Melwyn emerges as the
  proud winner, but I think the best part was the MetalVotze guys chasing
  each other in the wrong direction and generally sabotaging each other
  instead of trying to win.  :)

  13:18:
  I went to a bank to exchange some money, and ran back to the party place
  cause it started to rain.  At the entrance, I ran into Dixan, Melwyn,
  Shifter and Zania, who went shopping so I went along.  While an umbrella
  was high on the list of items to be bought, in the end we left the shop
  with lots of food, candy, fruit juice and vodka, but no umbrella.

  There's another live DJ set on the podium, it's not bad IMHO.

  14.19:
  The group MetalVotze has auctioned some cans of spam with their own label,
  the money goes to the Buenzli orgos but in the end one of the orgos bid
  the most.  :) I see on the visitor list on the party web site that
  Skyrunner should be here as well, so I walk around until I find him.  He
  has of course entries for every music compo, as usual, but they are all
  finished already so now he's working on the music for a 64K intro.  Talk
  about being a workaholic.  :)

  The big screen shows a Discloned Remix that I've never seen before, it
  looks really spectacular.

  15:37:
  And a new fun compo starts: the OHP FX compo.  This stands for "OverHead
  Projector Effect", and each group has to use plastic sheets, markers and
  transparent objects to show effects on a simple overhead projector.
  Scrollers are pretty popular, blur can be done by lifting the plastic
  sheet above the glass plate, and even oldskool hypnotic circles make an
  appearance.  Since there are only two groups, the winner is chosen by the
  loudness of the applause.

  16:44:
  Another DJ show live on stage, they're called Shaper and while I'm not a
  techno fan, I must say they are very good.  The orgos ask that whoever is
  using eDonkey or similar P2P programs to stop them because they are
  blocking our uplink.

  18:35:
  The tracked music compo is about to start.

  19:18:
  There were 10 tracked songs, not bad for such a small party.  I liked the
  "Disco music still toolz" entry, an energetic song that got some people
  dancing on the podium, and the "Flood of Energy" by Cyborg Jeff was nice
  as well.  Due to a lack of entries, the level design and alternative demo
  compos are canceled.  The deadline to submit demos, intros and wild
  entries is moved 1 hour mater.

  The graphics compo starts with some very good entries, but then titles and
  pictures got mixed up so the compo has to restart.  The Buenzli cow
  inspires some nice pictures, one in a disco version and another in an
  oldskool 16-color low-resolution mode.  Of course there are some pretty
  girl-pics as well, but at least it's limited to faces instead of boobies.

  20:40:
  The streamed music compo has started, there have been several nice tunes
  already but few with vocals

  21:54:
  No less than 19 entries competed, which was more than were preselected at
  Assembly! Gibraltar was a great entry with good vocals that'll probably
  end in the top-3, and Skyrunners "Scener wie wir" is the first tune I hear
  from him where I actually like the vocals (his instrumental stuff has
  always been nice).

  23:00:
  The 64K intro compo was delayed because they had to fix a Linux problem
  but it starts now.  There were 5 entries, including one 4k intro that used
  the Windows voice synthesizer to greet a lot of groups.  The others were a
  Fishtro2 tribute to Future Crew, a joke entry from Mandarine on Linux, and
  2 normal 64Ks of varying quality.

  To compensate for the hour-long delays in previous compos, the wild compo
  starts 3 minutes earlier.  :) There are some weird music videos, the
  traditional "destroy the cow-mascotte" video, a couple of techno
  animations and lots of short joke entries.  My favorite is the
  Lochmaschine anim, with a factory creating black walking blobs.

  -=- Sunday 31 August -=-
  0:49:
  The demo compo had only 7 entries, some good, some bad.  Mandarine made a
  funny Demopajaa entry with South-park style characters, it's called 85
  Dollars.  Another good one was MFX's Ultimatum to Poland: Last days before
  the war.  It's pretty abstract, if you look carefully you can see the
  outlines of tanks driving past.

  The surprise compo has 5 entries, the best one is an animation of a cow
  playing on an organ in a parking lot.

  2:05:
  Unlock calls Weasel on the podium for an announcement: it's Weasels
  birthday so he gets a cake and everybody sings Happy Birthday.  :)

  9:27:
  I'm back awake, way after the 8 o'clock voting deadline but i voted for
  most compos beforehand.  I ask Unlock how it's possible there are so many
  more entries when the number of visitors is lower then last year.  It
  turns out you don't have to be physically present to compete, you can
  submit entries via the net.  And the low number of visitors (about 120) is
  typical after a change in location, next year attendance should be up
  again.

  11:02:
  There's no sign yet that the prize ceremony is about to start, as it
  should.  But I know there's a train to Zurich at least every 30 minutes,
  so I don't fret about missing my train to Belgium.  Yet.

  A nice feature of the party web site is that it shows a list of IP-numbers
  that haven't been patched against the Blaster worm yet, and the orgos have
  CDs with the patch available.  very wise, IMO.

  The MetalVotze group is making annoyingly loud noises, of falling bombs,
  explosions etc.  During the night they played some Star Trek episode with
  (apparently) funny german dubs, but it started to get annoying after the
  tenth time or so :-/

  Eventually the big screen says the prize giving ceremony is 1 hour
  delayed, it should start at 11h 59m 59s, and so it does.

  After the 0A000 orgos make some advertisement, we go right to the compo
  results which are displayed using the breakpoint system.  The prizes are
  T-shirts, cowee puppets, some free entrance tickets for Scene Event, and
  money, software licenses and sponsored hardware for the best entries.

  Most results are predictably due to a large difference in quality between
  the entries.  The disco cow wins the graphics compo with twice as many
  votes as the second place, Melwyn wins the streamed music compo with his
  Gibraltar tune, and Dixan reaches second place.  My wild demo favorite
  loses with only 3 points from Gefangen/DaftN0!ze, and the 64K Run/Oezgyrs
  get 1 point more then the talking 4K so it wins the intro compo.
  Nectarine wins the demo compo, deservingly IMHO, and MFX gets second
  place.

  Following a strang tradition, the last loser of the graphics compo gets an
  old Buenzli 2 t-shirt, which he has to return the next year so it can be
  given to the last place of that Buenzlis graphics compo.  :)

  And with that, I pack my stuff, say goodbye to my friends and hurry off to
  the station, where I'm still on time to catch my train.  Buenzli 12 was a
  pretty good party, too bad there weren't more people.  The weather was
  pretty bad, raining all the time, but then again I spend half of my time
  coding, so I don't care.  I've done probably more at Buenzli than in an
  entire month in my free time, demo parties are really a great inspiration
  to do some serious work.  :) The next party near Belgium is still a long
  time away (State Of The Art/France/December?), so I was glad I got a large
  dose of partying this month.  :) Greets to everyone I met, and see you
  again later!

                 --Seven


--=--=--
--=--=------=--=------=--=----
  Modes
  By:  Dilvie
--=--=------=--=------=--=----

  In the last article, we discussed some neat shortcuts to help you learn
  the key signatures.  I made a passing mention of the patterns of half
  steps and whole steps that form the harmonic framework of a passage of
  music.  In this article, we're going to take the mystery out of modes.

  Let H represent a half step, and W represent a whole step.  The pattern
  for Major (the Ionic mode) is W W H W W W H.  The pattern for Minor
  (Aeolian) is W H W W H W W.  Here's an interesting way to visualize it:


      W W H W W W H
  W H W W H W W


  If we repeat each sequence twice, it might become even more clear:


      W W H W W W H W W H W W W H
  W H W W H W W W H W W H W W


  A whole step is made up of two half steps.  As you can see, the different
  modes are really exactly the same pattern.  The only real difference is
  that they have different starting and ending points, called offsets.
  Change the offset, change the mode.  So, here is a list of all the modes:


  W H W W H W W              Aeolian
    H W W H W W W            Locrian
      W W H W W W H          Ionian
        W H W W W H W        Dorian
          H W W W H W W      Phrygian
            W W W H W W H    Lydian
              W W H W W H W  Mixolydian


  On a piano keyboard, you can play all of these modes without ever touching
  the black keys.  When you play a scale this way, it's called a "natural
  scale."  For Aeolian, simply play A - A (A minor).  Locrian is B - B.
  Ionian is C - C (C minor).  Dorian is D - D, and so on.  You can also play
  the same modes starting from any key.  Simply preserve the order of half
  steps and whole steps, and you'll be playing in the right mode.

  Modes are movable patterns.  Shift around.  Get creative.  If you're a
  keyboard player, it would really improve your jamming skills if you learn
  how to play in any mode with any tonic (starting note).  Guitar players
  have it easy.  Memorize a few finger patterns and those same patterns will
  carry up and down the fret board without much in the way of revision.  The
  same finger patterns will often work with a variety of modes -- simply
  start the scale on a different note.

  There are a lot of advanced tricks that you can do modulating between
  different modes and even blending parallel modes within the same passage,
  but now that you've got some understanding of the basics, you have a good
  foundation for further exploration.

                 --Dilvie


--=--=--
--=--=------=--=------=--=----
  Build a MIDI System
  By:  Coplan
--=--=------=--=------=--=----

  It wasn't too long ago that I started working in MIDI.  My good friends,
  Setec and Dilvie, somehow managed to talk me into spending my year-end
  bonus on some MIDI equipment.  As I experimented early on in my MIDI
  experience, I learned quite a bit.  And now, almost two years later, I
  have a bit of valuable information that I can pass on.  I know a lot of
  people that have asked my thoughts on MIDI configurations, and I decided
  it was worth writing an article.

  First of all, let me say that I am not considered a MIDI guru by any
  stretch of the imagination, but I know computers and enough about MIDI to
  understand what you need.  In this article, I will not teach you how to
  run MIDI; however, I will give you a starting point should you decide to
  get into MIDI.  Please also keep in mind that I'm writing from a "real-
  life" perspective.  There are a lot of ideal machines out there to create
  your MIDI studio on, but they aren't as cost effective.  Budget is always
  an issue in the real world - and keep this in mind, always.  You are,
  after all, a hobby-musician.  You don't get paid for this.

  Before I go on, I need to explain a little about MIDI.  We'll consider a
  simple setup.  Say you have a keyboard/synth sitting outside your
  computer.  This gets hooked to your computer in two ways in order for you
  to record things.  It's connected via MIDI Cables through a MIDI
  interface.  Your sound card might already have one (I'll cover this a bit
  more later).  It also must be connected via audio cables.  Contrary to
  popular belief, the audio does not pass through the MIDI cables.  Your
  sequencing program (Cubase, Cakewalk Sonar, etc.) will record notes that
  are made by pounding on your keyboard/synth.  When you hit play in your
  sequencer, it tells your synth to play said note.  And that note gets
  heard over the audio lines.  So unless the audio is hooked into your
  computer, you can't record it onto your computer.

  The keyboard is considered a MIDI controller.  There are several kinds of
  controllers, but for the sake of this article, we'll use a keyboard.  Some
  synthesizers (like mine) have the keyboard built it.  Others might be
  rack-mountable modules that require an external controller.  Many
  controllers don't have built-in synthesizers.  Your sound card may also
  have an internal synthesizer, but it's nothing compared to the external
  synthesizers on the market, or even some of the software synthesizers.
  Contrary to popular belief, your sound card does not have to have a
  synthesizer to work with MIDI music.  Hell, these days, most games don't
  even need your sound card to have a synthesizer.

  With that in mind, lets get started.  First of all, you need a machine.
  Some of you already have nice machines, in which case you'll just want to
  add on to it.  Others might want to start from scratch.  If you're into
  building computers and you know your hardware very well, feel free to
  build your own - but if you ever have problems with any of your hardware,
  it'll be magnified by any Audio or Video editing programs you might use.
  Considering what you'll be using, I would recommend some sort of Pentium
  or Athlon chip.  I would recommend against the Duron and Celeron
  processors, as they won't work as smoothly as the other processors.  Audio
  editing can be pretty taxing, but believe me, you don't need the top of
  the line.  As things have been lately, the processors are getting cheaper
  and cheaper.  I have a 1.4GHz processor, and it works fine.  You should be
  able to get a 2GHz processor without breaking the bank.

  Next comes the issue of Memory and storage.  There really is no issue
  here.  RAM is cheap.  Buy as much as you can afford, and get the fastest
  RAM available to you for your motherboard.  At a bare minimum, I would
  recommend 512MB of RAM.  When it comes to storage, many people think of
  size - the bigger the hard drive, the better.  Well, there is only some
  truth to this.  The fact is, even small hard drives these days are big.  A
  more important thing to worry about is speed.  Right now, Seagate has some
  of the best hard drives for two reasons:  They're fast, and they're quiet.
  If you ever plan to work with a microphone, you'll want a quiet hard drive
  too.  Hard drives can make a lot of noise, and noise will end up on your
  recordings.  This is just one place to quiet your computer down.  Now
  there's always the question of hard drive quantities.  I would recommend
  having a separate hard drive just for your music.  Record your music
  there, and store it there.  Nothing else.  Your programs should run off
  the other hard drive.  If you can afford it, I would even recommend
  picking up an additional IDE controller card as well.  Make your music
  hard drive a master on its own controller, and it will work that much
  faster.  This seems extreme.  But when you're recording to your hard drive
  (and there is a lot of that in MIDI), your hard drive will be the
  bottleneck.  If your hard drive pauses too long, you will hear it in the
  recording as a click or a skip.  If nothing else, make sure you have a
  good hard drive.  Don't tighten the budget here.

  As for the sound card, this is an important piece of equipment.  It's your
  interface to the MIDI world.  There are several schools of thought on
  sound cards, and I could write an entire article just on selecting a sound
  card.  But I'll be brief and tell you something you probably didn't
  expect:  Your Sound Blaster sucks!  Don't get me wrong, they aren't
  terrible cards -- for gaming.  But there are a couple of reasons why your
  Sound Blaster isn't ideal for MIDI.  While it does have MIDI
  inputs/outputs (either with special cables or with a front panel
  interface), the latency on the SB is slow.  What this means is that if you
  have a software sampler (for example), and you hit a key, you might not
  hear the note right away.  It will sound fine when you do a playback, but
  it makes you nuts when you're recording a channel.  In addition, Sound
  Blasters will always have a minor hiss when it comes to recording - they
  have a poor signal-noise response curve, and since you'll be recording
  from an outside source, this makes your song sound poor.  If you already
  have one of these cards, you might want to work with it for now.  But keep
  in mind that you'll want to get a new card later down the line.  And when
  you do, life will become that much cleaner and easier.

  So what about the sound card selection then?  For MIDI, you'll need both a
  MIDI interface and audio inputs.  I personally prefer to have the MIDI
  interface built into the sound card, but this isn't necessary.  M-Audio,
  Edirol and Roland (among others) make MIDI interfaces that connect to your
  computer through the USB port or a firewire port.  If you want to keep
  your Sound Blaster, this would be a way to go to fix the latency issue.
  You can get one for as little as $50 USD.  But assuming you want it built
  into your sound card, that will definitely narrow down your options.

  As for the audio inputs, this is a bigger deal than you think.  Almost all
  sound cards have some sort of stereo input with a mini-jack.  Your
  synthesizer will often have the left and right output channels separated.
  They might have a headphone jack on there as well, but ideally, you'll
  want to connect left and right up separately. This helps in the mixing
  down the line if you have your channels separated.  So finding a sound
  card with multiple mono audio inputs is ideal.  Most professional sound
  cards have at least two mono-inputs.  If you plan to expand down the line,
  you might want more inputs.  You can then hook multiple synths into your
  sound card and mix them directly on your computer.

  As I said earlier, your new sound card doesn't necessarily have to have a
  built-in synthesizer.  Expect to spend at least $350 for a good sound
  card.  Some of the more popular sound cards are the Terratec DMX 6fire,
  Terratec EWS88 MT, ST Audio C-Port, ST Audio M-Port, M-Audio Audiophile,
  M-Audio Delta or some of the Aardvark cards.  What you get is more a
  matter of preference and budget, but just make sure you get a good quality
  card with 24bit/96KHz recording.  On a side note, some people prefer to
  use Software Synths as a cheaper solution.  Supposing you want to do this,
  you can save a lot by just getting a good MIDI interface for your MIDI
  controller - even with software synths, having a controller is very
  useful.  But even still, a better sound card will result in a better
  sounding song.

  For many of you, the hardware selection can end here.  Especially those of
  you who have been tracking for a very long time, you might decide that
  software is the way to go for your synthesis.  There has been much debate
  over whether or not to use software or hardware synths in your studio.  If
  you were to ask me, it simply comes down to preference.  If you do decide
  to use software synths, for at least part of your studio, processor speed
  becomes that much more important when you're building your machine.  For
  every soft-synth you load, for every new channel you demanding from that
  soft-synth, you're adding more load on your processor.  Memory is also
  important as you'll be loading quite a bit of software and associate
  modules at one time.  If you happen to have an older computer lying
  around, you will want to look into a special system link feature offered
  by Steinberg's sequencer, Cubase.  I have had absolutely no experience
  with the system link, but you can apparently synchronize two computers
  together using Cubase.  This would allow you to use that other machine as
  a virtual synthesizer, thus freeing up some processor time for your
  workhorse machine.

  Even if you use software synths, as I said earlier, you will definitely
  want to consider some sort of MIDI controller.  While you could click away
  on a piano roll, that's not a very practical method of writing a song -
  and unlike the world of tracking, many sequencers don't allow you to map
  notes to your PC keyboard, so it's only logical to have some controller
  device.  Which one you choose is a matter of preference.  Make sure you're
  comfortable with it, make sure it feels good.  People with extensive piano
  skills might want a full size keyboard with weighted keys to get that
  piano-like feel.  Others might be interested in one of the small profile
  2.5 octave keyboards with lots of knobs to control lots of things in your
  sequencer.

  Be aware that there are alternative MID controllers, too.  You can get a
  controller that works similar to a woodwind (it looks like a plastic
  clarinet) or a guitar (with buttons instead of strings).  If you
  specialize in either of these, you may want to consider such a device; but
  as always with input devices, make sure you're 100% comfortable with the
  device.  Statistics and data won't truly tell you what you'll like.  Go to
  the music store and play with it.  Do that a couple of times.  It could
  save you from a couple hundred dollar mistake (or if it's integrated with
  a synth, a couple thousand dollar mistake).

  For some, like me, software synthesis isn't all that comfortable of a
  method.  As I said, it's all truly a matter of preference.  I personally
  prefer to use external hardware synthesizers for my studio.  There is
  something about a tactile approach to selecting samples, modifying them
  and playing with them all on your synth module.  Synth modules are often
  either rack-mount or table top forms.  Some even have a built in MIDI
  controller.  Many companies offer their synths in either of these formats
  - the ever popular Virus module comes all three ways, for example.  There
  are all different type of synthesizers and MIDI Devices.  There are
  samplers, there are noise generation modules, there are modelling synths,
  drum machines and so on.  I could really write a whole article about the
  different types.  But that would get tedious.  And I couldn't give you a
  general formula for picking your first synth.  Look at the type of music
  you do, and use that to determine the type of synth you would need; only
  then should you start comparing brands and models.

  I started with the notion that I write a lot of orchestral and soft-rock
  music.  I work mostly with real instruments - not so much with the techno
  stuff, but I like to dabble in that now and again.  So I wanted a synth
  that would provide a lot of orchestral and studio instruments.  I wasn't
  so interested in tweaking or modifying my patches either, so I didn't need
  anything with lots of modeling capabilities.  I ended up buying a Roland
  XP-30.  It has a built-in MIDI controller and rather easy-to-use
  interface.  I can upgrade the synth by adding additional upgrade modules.
  Three came with the synth, and I can add two more from a choice of about
  20-30 different modules offered by Roland.  I started with a large sample
  set of orchestral instruments and I even got some good techno sounds; and
  since it has a built-in controller, I can control my next synth with this
  one.  Someone like my friend Jesper (Setec), however, likes to create his
  own sounds.  He's got a modeling synth and he'll twist lots of knobs and
  move lots of sliders through the course of his music writing.  My XP-30
  might not be ideal for him.  He might be interested in something like the
  Virus.  Someone else might be interested in pulling sounds from other
  recordings and modifying them for their own music.  They may want to get a
  sampler.  Regardless of what you find, just make sure it's what you need.
  These things can get expensive, and the moment you take it off the shelf,
  its price drops significantly.  You're never going to find the jack-of-
  all-trades device.  You're going to find one that is ideal for one aspect
  of your music.  Select the one that fulfills the largest gap in your
  studio.  You can always add more synths later on down the road.  But if
  you buy a synth, make sure you know it inside and out.  Make sure you use
  that machine to its full potential.  You wouldn't want to waste a
  beautiful piece of equipment like that.

  So now all our hardware (or virtual hardware, as the case may be) is
  accounted for.  We have our beefy computer, our awesome sound card, our
  synths;  we need to get it all to work together.  You need to look into
  getting yourself a Sequencing program.  There are many out there and lots
  to choose from.  Most of the popular ones are expensive.  Expect to drop a
  couple of hundred dollars (USD) on the sequencing program itself.  You'll
  have to do a lot of research here as well.  Download all the trial
  programs for any of the sequencing programs you might consider.
  Steinberg's Cubase, Cakewalk's Sonar and others will almost always offer
  some sort of trial version.  It's important that you do this, because if
  you don't like the interface or you're not comfortable with the
  program.... you're not going to write anything.  In fact, I would even
  recommend doing this before you get your synth or other hardware.  You
  will be limited in what you can do, but you'll learn whether MIDI
  sequencing is right for you.

  There are a lot of other cheap solutions, and especially if you want to
  work with a Sampler, this might be appropriate.  Renoise can be yours, the
  full version, for only about $40 last I checked.  And it is powerful, and
  it uses the tracking interface you're accustomed to.  Impulse Tracker fans
  might want to check out Ztracker.  It's free!  However, all of these will
  have limitations in the world of MIDI.  You won't be able to record your
  MIDI tracks to audio tracks for extra effects.  You might not even have
  access to all the patches on your MIDI module; I can't with my XP-30 as
  there are too many libraries in it that I have to access them utilizing a
  different method.  Cubase and Cakewalk both adapt to my synth quite well.
  Ztracker and Renoise, however, do not.  Besides, you'll also have to keep
  some charts handy all the time so that you can punch in the bank and patch
  numbers all the time; whereas in Cubase (and I'm sure in Sonar), you can
  import your synth's patch list and select by patch name.  It makes life
  that much easier.  But again, if you're using a sampler, these programs
  might be enough.  With a sampler, your sequencing program works just like
  a tracker except that you'll be pulling off your module instead of your
  hard drive.  For many musicians, this is a preferred method to the
  software alternative as it frees up a great deal of memory for your
  computer as well as some processing time.

  So there you have it.  You're ready to start in the world of MIDI now.  As
  I've said before, and I'll say it 100 times, make sure you're comfortable
  with your equipment before you buy.  Don't get discouraged by the world of
  MIDI.  It's a very different animal than you're probably used to working
  with.  I've been in the world of MIDI for two years now, and there are
  still some large question marks hanging in the air above my head.  I've
  still got a lot to learn, and I will probably never learn it all.  But
  it's a very happy medium to work in, and I'm glad I made the move.  But
  beware; once you start, you'll become more of an audiophile than you were
  before.  The rich sounds that you can get out of MIDI and the ease in
  which you can dynamically tweak a song is matched by no other method of
  electronic music writing.  You'll want to buy more hardware the moment you
  start playing with whatever it is you have.  You'll want to get better
  speakers, you'll want to add more modules to your setup.  Trust me, it can
  become a downward spiral.  But isn't that what hobbies are for?  Just
  don't tell me that you weren't warned.

  But as I said, I couldn't be happier with the move.  And now that you know
  what you need to get started, you probably won't be unhappy either.  I
  shall only offer one more piece of advice before I go:  Ask lots of
  questions.  Ask questions of those who are into MIDI.  Ask questions about
  the programs they use, why they use them or why they don't use other
  programs.  Ask them about tips, tricks and what-not.  My techniques might
  not work for you, but someone else's might.  They might share a similar
  perspective that I might not.  So don't limit yourself to asking one
  person.  Ask as many people as you can.  But make sure you ask those
  questions.  It could become a beautiful start to a great hobby medium.

                 --Coplan


--=--=--
--=--=------=--=------=--=----
  On The Sideline
    "Unnamed" and "Xor Life, 0xFF" by Salice
  By:  Ben
--=--=------=--=------=--=----

  "Unnamed" and "Xor Life, 0xFF" are part of a seven mod release by Salice,
  and the whole release is minimal and melodic music.  Both songs are good
  music to space out to, or to turn on low and leave in the background.  I
  was unable to find a home page for Salice, but did find a release under
  Milk (http://www.milk.scene.org/greenblu.html) and a CDR release
  (http://neferiu.com/neferiu/discography_info.php?release=salice_salice).

  "Unnamed" focuses more on the instrument than on the percussion.  There is
  little variation in the drums, but at least they aren't a canned loop!
  The instrument is a small sine wave, and Salice times the notes and bends
  their pitch to get interesting effects.  Because of the simplicity and
  playfulness of this song, I couldn't get the image of a nursery out of my
  mind when listening to it.

  "Xor Life, 0xFF" was a little more interesting in my opinion.  Just the
  title appeals to the geek side, saying "turn life upside-down as if
  performing an 8-bit operation.  The song, in a similar vein, sounds a bit
  like a chip tune with a style I've heard described as "drilly".  I find
  this style is very satisfactory in this song: rapid bumps, clicks and pops
  uplifting a sedate synth background.  The chord instrument sounded vaguely
  like a clock chime when going C, E, D, I kept expecting to hear it
  continue lower-G, pause, lower-G, D, E, C.


  Song Information:

  Title:       "Unnamed" and "Xor Life, 0xFF"
  Author:      Salice
  File Size:   126k
  Source:      ftp://ftp.scene.org/pub/music/groups/mute/yesterday.zip

                 --Ben Collver



--=--=--
--=--=------=--=------=--=----
  In Tune
    "Decomposing Angels" by Matt Pollard
  By:  Coplan
--=--=------=--=------=--=----

  This month, I managed to download a bunch of tunes.  I'm writing about a
  tune by the name of "Decomposing Angels" this month as it became the
  surprise addition to my playlist.  As anyone would, I have a tendency to
  develop a brief opinion of a song based on my first impression.  Often, I
  download so much music that I rarely give a tune a second chance.  This
  wonderful little song by Matt Pollard surprised me the second time around.

  I'll speak in broad terms.  If you liked some of Radiohead's more
  experimental music from "Amnesiac" and "Kid A", you will appreciate this
  song.  If you like Massive Attack, you'll like this song.  If you like to
  hear experimental sounds coming from your speakers, you'll definitely love
  this song.  I wouldn't really know how to classify the song other than
  some sort of experimental style.

  One of the things I find useful to people is when I tell them why my first
  impression wasn't very favorable.  While I did change my mind in the end,
  and I do really like this song, many people (including myself on some
  occasions) might not give a given song a second chance.  First impressions
  are very important to the unknown artist.  You won't get anywhere if you
  don't show your talents up front.  That being said, the whole first two
  minutes of the song is very experimental with lots of weird base sounds,
  non-drum percussion and electronic bleeps in the background.  I describe
  it that way intentionally.  Yes, the artist had a clear vision in mind at
  this point, but the listener does not.  I was not clear as to the
  direction of the song, and therefore I didn't give the rest of the song
  too much attention.  At about the 2:25 minute mark, a piano is introduced
  to the song, and the whole dynamic changes.  But as I was initially not
  interested, I wasn't giving this much thought.

  But what is important to me, now that I like the song, is the fact that
  the overall dynamic of the song has such depth to it.  The intent of the
  Matt Pollard is now a bit more clear to me.  Whether or not my views are
  the very same as Pollard's, I have some sort of vision.  The song title
  puts two very different images in my head.  An angel, to me, is a very
  beautiful thought:  Caring, confident, graceful, fresh.  Decomposition is
  a terminal thought.  Something has died, something has dissolved,
  something isn't what it was.  With that in mind, one would expect some
  sort of time-line to the song.  The beautiful parts would be first and the
  rougher and more "decomposed" parts would be towards the end.  But then I
  had this thought:  What if Pollard is portraying his realization of the
  status quo?  The whole beginning of the song can represent a repressed and
  monotonous well being.  Something is wrong, something isn't there.  The
  very notion only comes to us at about 1:45 where you hear the very first
  indication that a piano is present.  But it's only one note, an incomplete
  thought.  Then the epiphany comes to light at about 2:25.  Suddenly, we're
  aware what was missing, and we try the best to rebuild it.  The piano does
  quite well at portraying this vision, and it is very beautiful.

  Alright, so what about the technical aspects of the song?  I really can't
  say much for the first 2 minutes or so.  It's all clean as it could be,
  and I don't really have many thoughts about how this part of the song is
  composed.  It works, and beyond that, I have nothing to say.  The part
  that won me over is the piano.  The piano is very clear.  The samples are
  awesome.  And to top it off, the mixing is incredible.  You couldn't get a
  piano to sound any more natural without striking the keys of the
  instrument in person.  But Pollard does one other thing very well:
  Background mixing.  Deep in the background are things that, unless you
  were looking for them, are so subtle and so distant that you often
  wouldn't even notice them.  There are some strings in the background of
  the second part of the song that I just now noticed my 10th time through.
  And no, I'm not talking about the blatant ones in the foreground.  There's
  a whole section of strings in there.  But they definitely provide a sense
  of depth to the song.  Some of the percussion is subtle to the point that
  you wouldn't even miss it.  And while you wouldn't miss it, you should be
  glad it's there.  There is a certain complexity to Pollard's style that I
  admire.  It's very complex, but so very simple.  The leads are simple and
  graceful, but the background parts are just the opposite.  It's a very
  nice balance.

  I'm almost sorry I was so ready to dismiss this song the first time
  through.  I surely would've missed a truly wonderful song.  So now I think
  I will go through my collection one more time and listen to everything I
  had previously thought poorly of.  I have a lot of work ahead of me.

  Song Information:

  Title:          Decomposing Angels
  Author:         Matt Pollard
  Release date:   Nov. 19, 2002
  File Size:      6 MB
  Source:         http://www.hellven.org (Hellven release #93)

                 --Coplan

  "In Tune" is a regular column dedicated to the review of original and
  singular works by fellow trackers.  It is to be used as a tool to expand
  your listening and writing horizons, but should not be used as a general
  rating system.  Coplan's opinions are not the opinions of the Static Line
  Staff.

  If you have heard a song you would like to recommend (either your own, or
  another person's), We can be contacted through e-mail using the addresses
  found in the closing notes.  Please do not send files attached to e-mail
  without first contacting us.  Thank you!


--=--=--
--=--=------=--=------=--=----
  The Lineup
  By:  Novus
--=--=------=--=------=--=----

  Welcome to The Lineup!  Every month, I scour through the hundreds of new
  releases on the scene's major archive sites to find the best new music,
  saving you the trouble of having to download 20 instant-delete songs to
  find 1 that's worth keeping.

  In fact, that's precisely how Jesse Nijder uses The Lineup, as he
  explained in his recent feedback e-mail:

  "Thanks a lot for the monthly Lineup in Static Line, it saves me a
  tremendous amount of time (which I really don't have) searching for the
  best MODs.  Apart from that, I'm still on a 56k dialup so it takes a very
  long time to download even a few megs.  Your list actually prevents me
  from downloading tracks which are not worth the time, thank you for that.
  ;)"

  You're welcome, Jesse, and thank you for "using as directed," as it were.
  ;) And if you're so inclined, you can send your feedback on The Lineup to
  vince_young@hotmail.com.  I get my share of compliments, but what I'd
  really find useful are some negative comments, believe it or not, e-mail
  from folks who find The Lineup to be a complete and utter waste of time.
  I'm not perfect, so I know you're out there somewhere.  Let me know what's
  wrong so I can make it right!

  A word about some of this month's selections...  you may notice some
  rather high-profile selections from Awesome this month that were actually
  released several years ago, and you may have noticed similar selections
  from other high-profile trackers in the past.  Why are they there, you may
  ask?  Two reasons.  First of all, to paraphrase NBC television's ads for
  their re-runs, if you haven't heard it, it's new to you.  As odd as it may
  seem, there are plenty of folks reading this who may never have heard of
  Awesome before, and this is their first exposure to his music.  And that
  brings me to reason two: I treat any song that appears on any of the sites
  I monitor as a "new release" under the theory of reason number one.  This
  month, Awesome re-released a selection of his older tracks on both Cute
  Trance Girls and Scene.org, so I treated them as "new."  In selecting The
  Best Of The Best, however, I tend to give weight to songs which truly are
  new so as to give up-and-coming trackers more exposure.  And there ya go,
  a peek behind the curtain, as it were.  :)

  In the meantime, you may consider the following 19 tunes to be the best
  tracks of September 2003:


  -=- THE BEST OF THE BEST -=-
  "Aeryn Sun" - Pro-Xex - fantasy
  http://www.modarchive.com/cgi-bin/download.cgi/A/aerynsun.it

  -=- THE REST OF THE BEST -=-
  "Achilles" - Blacklily - orchestral
  http://www.modarchive.com/cgi-bin/download.cgi/A/achilles3.it

  "Ancient Stories" - Awesome - fantasy
  ftp://ftp.scene.org/pub/music/artists/awesome/aws_magi.zip

  "Ancient Stories: High-Quality Version" - Awesome - fantasy
  ftp://ftp.scene.org/pub/music/artists/awesome/awesome-ancient_stories_hqversion.zip
  (Re-mastered and somewhat re-arranged, with some interesting new twists.)

  "Ancient Stories 2: A Kingdom Of Tales" - Awesome - fantasy
  ftp://ftp.scene.org/pub/music/artists/awesome/aws_anc2.zip

  "Aquarium" - Awesome - fantasy
  ftp://ftp.scene.org/pub/music/artists/awesome/aws_aq16.zip

  "Beyond The Heart" - Awesome - fantasy
  ftp://ftp.scene.org/pub/music/artists/awesome/aws_beyo.zip

  "Dreaming" - Snu - classical piano
  http://www.modplug.com/mods/nrdetail.php3?session=&detailno=10907

  "For A New World" - Awesome - pop
  ftp://ftp.scene.org/pub/music/artists/awesome/aws_fanw.zip

  "Free Man's Tango" - PPH - orchestral
  ftp://ftp.scenesp.org/pub/modulez/PPH/pphfmt.zip

  "Linearity" - Screamager - dance
  ftp://ftp.scene.org/pub/music/artists/screamager/k_lnrty.zip

  "Mindy's Song" - Renzoku - pop
  http://zakkat.tripod.com/MOD/WW627MS.zip

  "Nultiply" - Eftos - dance
  http://eftos.members.easyspace.com/eftos_nultiply.zip

  "Plastic Reverie" - Decibelter - pop
  ftp://ftp.scene.org/pub/music/artists/decibelter/db_plast.zip

  "The Chase" - Awesome - fantasy
  ftp://ftp.scene.org/pub/music/artists/awesome/aws_chas.zip

  "The Different World" - Butch - fantasy
  ftp://ftp.scene.org/pub/music/artists/butch/b_dworld.zip

  "The Proces" - Michael Brandt - trance
  http://www.modarchive.com/cgi-bin/download.cgi?M/mike434b.s3m

  "The Shadow Exploded" - Screamager - pop
  ftp://ftp.scene.org/pub/music/artists/screamager/k_shadow.zip

  "The Unusual: Red Blood Remix" - Geniewiz - trance
  http://www11.brinkster.com/geniewiz/Unusual.zip
  (Original song tracked by DJ Deepvibe.)

  Latez!

                 --Novus


--=--=--
--=--=------=--=------=--=----
  Screen Lit Vertigo
    "Ninja in a Box", "Weltenkonstrukt", and "85 Dollars"
  By:  Seven
--=--=------=--=------=--=----

  -=- "Ninja In A Box" by TPOLM -=-

  (party-version)

  Found at www.scene.org
  2nd place at the Evoke Z003 demo compo

  System requirements: 9.4 MB HD, Win9x, DirectX9

  Test Machine: P4 2.6GHz 512MB DDR, Realtek AC'97, NVidia 488 GO 64MB, WinXP
    (Some parts had missing effects on an ATI Radeon 8500 LE 64MB)

  The credits:
    Code: Resika
    Graphics: Fthr, Crkr
    Music: Vaeinoke

  The demo:
  Ninja In A Box was actually submitted at Assembly, but much to the dismay
  of Tpolm fans everywhere, it wasn't preselected :/ But it got its revenge
  at Evoke!  This collection of eastern wisdom is brought to you in a
  yellow/red color scheme, with matching tints of pink and orange.  Most of
  the effects are made with big dots, which blend together to form fractals,
  a tunnel, and endless patterns of hexagons or stars.  The edge of the dots
  is subtly smudged here and there, I suspect this barely-visible
  improvement is the sole reason Tpolm used DirectX9 (with the result the
  dots aren't visible on an ATI 8500 :() The ever-moving backgrounds show
  moving bands of alternating colors, a bit like an oldskool palette cycle.
  Twice the camera dives in a maze of cubes, filled with more dots
  (reminding me positively of PacMan).

  Ninja In A Box is a highly educational demo, containing many amazing facts
  about ninjas, donuts and the nature of Buddha.  To complete the Tpolm
  experience, a host of bizarre animals wielding build-in bladed weapons
  appear threatening to eat you, under the supervision of a seven-eyed
  Jesus.  The music is a bit atonal, mainly driven by the rhythm section.
  Voice samples are used sparsely, and will only provoke more questions for
  the meaning of the demo.  Syncing is excellent, as could be expected.

  Overall:
  Ninja In A Box is a very stylish demo full of TPOLM weirdness, and as such
  may shock young children or people with "average" taste.  Check your
  abnormality tolerance level before downloading this, if you are perfectly
  happy with the Assembly results, chances this is not your cup of coffee.
  If, on the other hand, you've a sneaking suspicion there is something
  missing, try Ninja In A Box.


  -=- "Weltenkonstrukt" by Smash Designs -=-

  (party-version)

  Found at www.scene.org
  1st place at the Evoke Z003 demo compo

  System requirements: 27 MB HD, Win9x, recent 3D card

  Test Machine: P4 2.6GHz 512MB DDR, Realtek AC'97, NVidia 488 GO 64MB, WinXP

  Test Machine #2: P3 900 640MB, Gamesurround III, Radeon 8500 LE 64MB,
    Win98 SE

  The credits:
    Code: Kai, Tobi, Idefix
    Graphics: AEG
    Music: Sonic

  The demo:
  As with Adrenalin last year, Smash Designs pushes the envelope of 3D
  modeling with their latest demo, Weltenkonstruct (Welten = worlds).
  Instead of a fair, this time they decided to model an entire city! Parks,
  shopping halls, a museum, a church, historical buildings, apartment
  complexes,...  Everything is in there, and the level of detail is simply
  amazing.  Look at the flowers and the trees, and the curved surfaces
  everywhere...

  Of course, nothing is perfect: where Adrenalin was populated by sprite-
  people, which didn't look too great, Weltenkonstrukt is completely empty,
  leaving a very desolate atmosphere.  In addition, there are no shadows at
  all, not even precalculated ones on the textures, so it looks very
  synthetic.

  There are few conventional effects: some sun flares shining through the
  trees, and an antenna on top of a building broadcasting.  There are
  reflective surfaces everywhere, not only for windows or metal objects but
  also for marble f.e.  Impressive code-wise, but it adds to the plastic
  feeling.

  The music starts somewhat symphonic, like a movie-intro, during the start
  in the underground garage.  (Notice that besides the obvious joke on
  EliteGroups Kasparov, there's a more subtle one: the sign above the robot
  reads "women parking spot" :)) Once the camera gets in the open air, a
  beat is added, electronic leads come in and the track evolves to an
  energetic, but a bit repetitive demo tune.

  Overall:
  Weltenkonstrukt is not for everyone: it's a pure 3D camera flight with
  great modeling but a synthetic look, it's huge (12 MB zipped, 27 unzipped,
  long load time on slow PCs), and requires a decent 3D card to enjoy: my
  ATI 8500 stutters very noticeably on 1024 * 768, and even the Nvidia 488
  Go drops frames here and there.  But if you're looking for something to
  test your spanking new video card, or you simply want to be amazed by the
  modeling, check this one out!


  -=- "85 Dollars" by Nectarine -=-

  (party-version)

  Found at www.scene.org
  1st place at the Buenzli 13 demo compo

  System requirements: 15.4 MB HD, any PC that can run Demopajaa (wild guess:
    Pentium II, TNT2 3D card, and say 128 MB ram (long loading time...))

  Test Machine: P3 900 640MB, Gamesurround III, Radeon 8500 LE 64MB, Win98 SE

  Test Machine #2: P4 2.6GHz 512MB DDR, Realtek AC'97, NVidia 488 GO 64MB,
    WinXP

  The credits:
    Music & Demopajing: Med/Nectarine
    Gfx: Sacri/Move

  The demo:
  Nectarine used Demopajaa, Moppi Productions demo system, and some simple
  effect plugins to make a charming excentric demo.  It's less coherent than
  SuperJam Superheroes, but has the same wacky humor.  The cast of South
  Park style animated characters include some gangstas, a yodeling guitar
  player and an happy DJ.  There isn't any story, although it contains many
  references to Superman(-darine) and other old pop culture icons.  The
  fonts and other graphic elements are old-fashioned as well (60-70 style).
  The effects are rather simple, some flares, flashes, a bit of abstract 3D,
  but nothing special at all.  Still, the demo isn't boring, due to the
  quick changes in style.

  The music follows the same weirdness as the rest of the demo, the core is
  a DJ mix with scratched vocals, but it can change without warning into
  something more gangsta, and a few seconds later in an old French chanson.

  Overall:
  The mix of styles makes it hard to describe 85 Dollars, anything specific
  I say only applies to a small part of the demo.  It's funny, but it's not
  as polished as Nectarines last release.  It's also fairly big for a demo
  that is only 2 and a half minutes long, but in these days of broadband who
  cares?  One warning: after selecting the resolution, it seems as if the
  demo is crashed (nothing shown at all), but it's only loading.  Give it
  some time on slow computers.

                 --Seven


--=--=--
--=--=------=--=------=--=----
  Link List
--=--=------=--=------=--=----

    Portals:

        SceneSpot (Home of Static Line).......http://www.scenespot.org
        CFXweb.......................................http://cfxweb.net
        Czech Scene................................http://www.scene.cz
        Danish Scene..............................http://demo-scene.dk
        Demoscene.org.........................http://www.demoscene.org
        Demo.org...................................http://www.demo.org
        Diskmag.de...................................http://diskmag.de
        Greek Scene............................http://www.demoscene.gr
        Hungarian Scene........................http://www.demoscene.hu
        Italian Scene...........................http://run.to/la_scena
        Kahvi.....................................http://www.kahvi.org
        ModPlug Central Resources..........http://www.castlex.com/mods
        Noerror.................................http://www.noerror.org
        Norwegian Scene........................http://www.demoscene.no
        Orange Juice.............................http://www.ojuice.net
        Planet Zeus..........................http://www.planetzeus.net
        Polish Scene...........................http://www.demoscena.pl
        Pouet.net.................................http://www.pouet.net
        Russian Scene..........................http://www.demoscene.ru
        Scene.org.................................http://www.scene.org
        Scenergy on-line (8bit)............http://www.scenergy.natm.ru
        Scenet....................................http://www.scenet.de
        Spanish Scene............................http://www.escena.org
        Swiss Scene..............................http://www.chscene.ch
        United Trackers.................http://www.united-trackers.org

    Archives:

        Acid2.....................................ftp://acid2.stack.nl
        Amber.......................................ftp://amber.bti.pl
        Aminet.....................http://wuarchive.wustl.edu/~aminet/
        Cyberbox.....................................ftp://cyberbox.de
        Hornet (1992-1996)........................ftp://ftp.hornet.org
        MOD Archive..........................http://www.modarchive.com
        Scene.org..................................ftp://ftp.scene.org
        Scene.org Austra........................ftp://ftp.au.scene.org
        Scene.org Netherlands...................ftp://ftp.nl.scene.org
        Swiss Scene FTP...........................ftp://ftp.chscene.ch

    Demo Groups:

        3g Design..............................http://3gdesign.cjb.net
        3State...................................http://threestate.com
        7 Gods.........................................http://7gods.sk
        Aardbei.....................................http://aardbei.com
        Acid Rain..............................http://surf.to/acidrain
        Addict..................................http://addict.scene.pl
        Agravedict........................http://www.agravedict.art.pl
        Alien Prophets.....................http://www.alienprophets.dk
        Anakata..............................http://www.anakata.art.pl
        ASD....................................http://asd.demoscene.gr
        Astral..............................http://astral.scene-hu.com
        Astroidea........................http://astroidea.scene-hu.com
        BlaBla..............................http://blabla.planet-d.net
        Blasphemy..............................http://www.blasphemy.dk
        Bomb..................................http://bomb.planet-d.net
        Broncs..................................http://broncs.scene.cz
        Byterapers.....................http://www.byterapers.scene.org
        Bypass.................................http://bypass.scene.org
        Calodox.................................http://www.calodox.org
        Cocoon..............................http://cocoon.planet-d.net
        Confine.................................http://www.confine.org
        Damage...................................http://come.to/damage
        Dc5.........................................http://www.dc5.org
        Delirium..............................http://delirium.scene.pl
        Eclipse............................http://www.eclipse-game.com
        Elitegroup..........................http://elitegroup.demo.org
        Exceed...........................http://www.inf.bme.hu/~exceed
        Fairlight.............................http://www.fairlight.com
        Fobia Design...........................http://www.fd.scene.org
        Freestyle............................http://www.freestylas.org
        Fresh! Mindworks...................http://kac.poliod.hu/~fresh
        Future Crew..........................http://www.futurecrew.org
        Fuzzion.................................http://www.fuzzion.org
        GODS...................................http://www.idf.net/gods
        Halcyon...........................http://www.halcyon.scene.org
        Haujobb..................................http://www.haujobb.de
        Hellcore............................http://www.hellcore.art.pl
        Infuse...................................http://www.infuse.org
        Inquisition....................http://inquisition.demoscene.hu
        Kilobite...............................http://kilobite.cjb.net
        Kolor................................http://www.kaoz.org/kolor
        Komplex.................................http://www.komplex.org
        Kooma.....................................http://www.kooma.com
        Mandula.........................http://www.inf.bme.hu/~mandula
        Maturefurk...........................http://www.maturefurk.com
        Monar................ftp://amber.bti.pl/pub/scene/distro/monar
        MOVSD....................................http://movsd.scene.cz
        Nextempire...........................http://www.nextempire.com
        Noice.....................................http://www.noice.org
        Orange.................................http://orange.scene.org
        Orion................................http://orion.planet-d.net
        Outbreak................................http://www.outbreak.nu
        Popsy Team............................http://popsyteam.rtel.fr
        Prone................................http://www.prone.ninja.dk
        Purple....................................http://www.purple.dk
        Rage........................................http://www.rage.nu
        Replay.......................http://www.shine.scene.org/replay
        Retro A.C...........................http://www.retroac.cjb.net
        Sista Vip..........................http://www.sistavip.exit.de
        Skytech team............................http://www.skytech.org
        Skrju.....................................http://www.skrju.org
        Spinning Kids......................http://www.spinningkids.org
        Sunflower.......................http://sunflower.opengl.org.pl
        Talent.............................http://talent.eurochart.org
        The Black Lotus.............................http://www.tbl.org
        The Digital Artists Wired Nation.http://digitalartists.cjb.net
        The Lost Souls...............................http://www.tls.no
        TPOLM.....................................http://www.tpolm.com
        Trauma.................................http://sauna.net/trauma
        T-Rex.....................................http://www.t-rex.org
        Unik........................................http://www.unik.de
        Universe..........................http://universe.planet-d.net
        Vantage..................................http://www.vantage.ch
        Wipe....................................http://www.wipe-fr.org

    Music Labels, Music Sites:

        Aisth.....................................http://www.aisth.com
        Aural Planet........................http://www.auralplanet.com
        Azure...................................http://azure-music.com
        Blacktron Music Production...........http://www.d-zign.com/bmp
        BrothomStates.............http://www.katastro.fi/brothomstates
        Chill..........................http://www.chillproductions.com
        Chippendales......................http://www.sunpoint.net/~cnd
        Chiptune...............................http://www.chiptune.com
        Da Jormas................................http://www.jormas.com
        Fabtrax......http://www.cyberverse.com/~boris/fabtrax/home.htm
        Fairlight Music.....................http://fairlight.scene.org
        Five Musicians.........................http://www.fm.scene.org
        Fusion Music Crew.................http://members.home.nl/cyrex
        Goodstuff..........................http://artloop.de/goodstuff
        Hellven.................................http://www.hellven.org
        Ignorance.............................http://www.ignorance.org
        Immortal Coil.............................http://www.ic.l7.net
        Intense...........................http://intense.ignorance.org
        Jecoute.................................http://jecoute.cjb.net
        Kosmic Free Music Foundation.............http://www.kosmic.org
        Lackluster.....................http://www.m3rck.net/lackluster
        Level-D.................................http://www.level-d.com
        Mah Music.............................http://come.to/mah.music
        Maniacs of noise...............http://home.worldonline.nl/~mon
        MAZ's sound homepage..................http://www.maz-sound.com
        Med.......................................http://www.med.fr.fm
        Miasmah.............................http://www.miasmah.cjb.net
        Milk.......................................http://milk.sgic.fi
        Mo'playaz..........................http://ssmedion.de/moplayaz
        Mono211.................................http://www.mono211.com
        Morbid Minds..............http://www.raveordie.com/morbidminds
        Moods..............................http://www.moodymusic.de.vu
        Mstation.....................http://mstation.org/software.html
        Nectarine Demoscene Radio................http://scenemusic.net
        Noise................................http://www.noisemusic.org
        One Touch Records......................http://otr.planet-d.net
        Park..................................http://park.planet-d.net
        pHluid..................................http://phluid.acid.org
        Radical Rhythms.....http://www.andrew.cmu.edu/user/merrelli/rr
        RBi Music.............................http://www.rbi-music.com
        Ruff Engine................http://members.xoom.com/ruff_engine
        SHR8M......................................http://1st.to/shr8m
        Sound Devotion................http://sugarbomb.x2o.net/soundev
        Soundstate.........................http://listen.to/soundstate
        Sunlikamelo-D.....................http://www.sunlikamelo-d.com
        Suspect Records........................http://www.tande.com/sr
        Tequila........................http://www.defacto2.net/tequila
        Tempo................................http://tempomusic.cjb.net
        Tetris....................................http://msg.sk/tetris
        Theralite...........................http://theralite.avalon.hr
        Tokyo Dawn Records........................http://tokyodawn.org
        Triad's C64 music archive.............http://www.triad.c64.org
        UltraBeat.........................http://www.innerverse.com/ub
        Vibrants................................http://www.vibrants.dk
        Zen of Tracking.........................http://surf.to/the-imm

    Programming:

        3D engines..........http://cg.cs.tu-berlin.de/~ki/engines.html
        3D programming portal.................http://www.3dgamedev.com
        Documents...............http://www.neutralzone.org/home/faqsys
        File format collection...................http://www.wotsit.org
        Game programming portal...............http://www.gamasutra.com
        LCC (free C compiler).........http://www.remcomp.com/lcc-win32
        NASM (free Assembly compiler)......http://www.cryogen.com/nasm
        Programming portal......................http://www.gamedev.net
        Programming portal.....................http://www.flipcode.com
        Programming portal......................http://www.exaflop.org
        Programming portal............http://www.programmersheaven.com
        Programming portal.....................http://www.freecode.com
        PTC video engine.........................http://www.gaffer.org

    Magazines:

        Amber...............................http://amber.bti.pl/di_mag
        Amnesia...............http://amnesia-dist.future.easyspace.com
        Demojournal....................http://demojournal.planet-d.net
        Eurochart.............................http://www.eurochart.org
        Heroin...................................http://www.heroin.net
        Hugi........................................http://www.hugi.de
        Music Massage......................http://www.scene.cz/massage
        Jurassic Pack...........................www.jurassicpack.de.vu
        Pain..................................http://pain.planet-d.net
        Scenial...........................http://www.scenial.scene.org
        Shine...............................http://www.shine.scene.org
        Static Line................http://www.scenespot.org/staticline
        Sunray..............................http://sunray.planet-d.net
        TUHB.......................................http://www.tuhb.org
        WildMag..................................http://www.wildmag.de

    Parties:

        Assembly (Finland).....................http://www.assembly.org
        Ambience (The Netherlands)..............http://www.ambience.nl
        Buenzli (Switzerland)......................http://www.buenz.li
        Dreamhack (Sweden)....................http://www.dreamhack.org
        Gravity (Poland)............http://www.demoscena.cp.pl/gravity
        Mekka-Symposium (Germany)...................http://ms.demo.org
        Pilgrimage (Utah, US)..............http://pilgrimage.scene.org
        ReAct (Greece).............................http://www.react.gr
        Takeover (The Netherlands).............,http://www.takeover.nl
        The Party (Denmark).....................http://www.theparty.dk

    Others:

        Demo secret parts....http://www.inf.bme.hu/~mandula/secret.txt
        Textmode Demo Archive.................http://tmda.planet-d.net
        Arf!Studios..........................http://www.arfstudios.org
        #coders..................................http://coderz.cjb.net
        Csound-tekno e-mail list......................................
           ............http://plot.bek.no/mailman/listinfo/csoundtekno
        Demonews Express.........http://www.teeselink.demon.nl/express
        Demo fanclub........................http://jerware.org/fanclub
        Digital Undergrounds.....................http://dug.iscool.net
        Everything tracking..http://zolaweb.com/Zola/trax/tracking.htm
        Freax.....................................http://www.freax.hu/
        GfxZone............................http://gfxzone.planet-d.net
        Mod-Radio.....................http://www.back2roots.org/Radio/
        PC-demos explained.....http://www.oldskool.org/demos/explained
        Pixel...................................http://pixel.scene.org
        #trax e-mail list.............................................
           .............http://www.scenespot.org/mailman/listinfo/trax
        Underground Mine.............http://www.spinningkids.org/umine

    IRC Channels:

        Graphics.........................................ircnet #pixel
        Graphics (French)..............................ircnet #pixelfr
        Music......................................irc.scene.org #trax
        Music.............................................ircnet #trax
        Programming.....................................ircnet #coders
        Programming....................................efnet #flipcode
        Programming (French)............................ircnet #codefr
        Programming (German)........................ircnet #coders.ger
        Programming (Hungarian)......................ircnet #coders.hu
        Scene.........................................ircnet #thescene
        Scene (French)..................................ircnet #demofr
        Scene (Hungarian)............................ircnet #demoscene
        Zx-spectrum scene..................................ircnet #z80

--=--=--
----=--=------=--=------=--=------=--=------=--=------=--=------=--=------


  -=- Staff -=-

    Editors:         Ciaran / Ciaran Hamilton / staticline@theblob.org
                     Ben / Ben Collver / collver1@comcast.net
    Staff Writers:   Coplan / D. Travis North / coplan@scenespot.org
                      Dilvie / Eric Hamilton / dilvie@dilvie.com
                      Novus / Vince Young / vince_young@hotmail.com
                      Psitron / Tim Soderstrom / tigerhawk@stic.net
                      Setec / Jesper Pederson / jesped@post.tele.dk
                      Seven / Stefaan VanNieuwenhuyze/ seven7@pandora.be
                      Tryhuk / Tryhuk Vojtech / vojtech.tryhuk@worldonline.cz
                      Vill / Brian Frank / darkvill@yahoo.com
                      The Watcher / Paul-Jan Pauptit / sprout@zonnet.nl

  The current issue of Static Line can always be found on the Web at:
    http://staticline.scenespot.org/issues/current_issue

  Static Line Subscription Management:
    http://www.scenespot.org/mailman/listinfo/static_line

  If you would like to contribute an article to Static Line, be aware that
  we will format your article to 76 columns with two columns at the
  beginning of each line.  Please avoid foul language and high ASCII
  characters.  Contributions (Plain Text) should be e-mailed to
  (static_line-owner@scenespot.org) by the last Friday of each month.  New
  issues are released on a monthly basis.

  See you next month!
-eof---=------=--=------=--=--