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                       cRu|________\     |    |                   Issue #41
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 November, 2002                          ||    /  \ \__/   /   /   /___// |
 295 Subscribers World Wide              |    /___/  \    /   /   __/_ /  |
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--=--=--
--=--=------=--=------=--=----
  Table Of Contents
----=--=------=--=------=--=--
     Opening:
        Message From the Editor
        Letters From Our Readers
     Features:
        Your View and Response -- Your Favorite Tune
        SceneSpot Update -- V.3 details
     Reviews:
        Music:
           In Tune -- Setec's "White"
           The Lineup -- The Best of the Month
        Demo:
           Screen Lit Vertigo -- Variform by Kewlers and The S by Suspend
     Opinion / Commentary:
        Editorial -- Scene Vs. Scene:  The OS Debate
        Inside My Mind -- My Addiction
        Early Dawn Reflections -- Jobs
     Link List: Get Somewhere in the Scene
     Closing: Staff and Contact Information


--=--=--
--=--=------=--=------=--=----
  Message From the Editor
----=--=------=--=------=--=--

     Well, we're back with yet another adventure in e-zine publishing.  A
  lot of you had good things to say about the last issue.  I'm hoping
  that the quality of the magazine will continue to rise, as well as our
  readership.  We picked up almost 15 subscribers within the span of a
  couple of days.  Keep passing the word.

     Meanwhile, we got another full issue for you.  As I suspected, The
  Watcher returned with a named column.  The new official name for his
  column is called "Early Dawn Reflections", a name which supposidly comes
  from the fact that he writes his articles early in the morning.  Vill,
  on the other hand, seems to like the name that I gave his column last
  month.  Of course, Seven has his demo reviews ready for you and I have
  my music review as well.  In addition, Novus returns with his first full
  installment of his column, The Lineup.  If you don't remember, the focus
  of his column is to share with you the best of the tunes that he
  downloaded this month.  Its a good list if you're looking for new tunes.

     The features this month both come from my hand at the keyboard.  We
  decided to try another attempt at getting some feedback from our
  readers.  Please offer your feedback, it'll be interesting to see what
  you have to write.  Read up on that in "Your View and Response".  The
  other feature article deals with the changes that will be made to our
  sister project, SceneSpot.  The quick note about it is that we will be
  releasing the new version of the site sometime before the next issue.
  The article highlights some of the changes that will be made.  Get more
  information from "SceneSpot Update".

     Well, that's all I have to say about this month's issue.  Just a
  reminder, we're always looking for new articles and conributions.  If
  you have anything to send, or if you have questions, you can contact me
  at coplan@scenespot.org.

     Until Next time.

                --Coplan


--=--=--
--=--=------=--=------=--=----
  Letters From Our Readers
----=--=------=--=------=--=--

  -=- A Message from Ped -=-

     I have somewhat hard time in life too (not as much as you, but I had
  felt similar things)... and I want to both thank you for showing me,
  that  you care and love the scene as I do. And I assure you, that I
  care about you and about any other creative being, who's willing to
  contribute with his ideas/work to the scene, or generally "public"...

     I actually somewhat dislike the growing size of static line. Reading
  trough the new issue took a serious amount of time, but the content was
  really excellent and worth while. May you try to keep SL issues under
  200 - 250kB of text in the future?  (i.e. not growing more, than twice
  from [issue 41's] size). I like the "news" format of SL, reading once in
  time few lines to keep me up with the scene thing. If I want to read
  MANY rich articles, I may turn to Hugi/other mag. I think this is what
  you intented to do, short news with insights, so I'm just giving you my
  opinion, that 200kB is limit for me... :)

     Once more: thank you for the last issue, really made me feel good. :)

                --Ped

  -=- Reply From Coplan -=-

  Ped,

     Your concerns are more common among our readers.  But here is
  something you might not know:  Your concerns are shared with the editor
  as well.  The truth is that a 200k magazine would be very difficult to
  read in this format.  It would be difficult for readers to find the
  articles they wanted.  The magazine would be unwieldy and hard to
  navigate.  That would not be something we'd want for our readers.

     The nature of running a magazine such as this one is that some months,
  we'll have more articles than we need, and other months, we don't have
  enough.  Keeping that in mind, it's often that we hold articles for the
  following month.  By doing that, we can keep the content in all our
  issues at relatively the same quality and quantity.

  The goal of Static Line is, and always will be, to bring inspiration and
  insight to the reader.  Through this publication, we have always hoped
  to bring creative thoughts to your mind.  A tool, such as Static Line,
  is only useful so long as it is easy to use.  Worry not, we don't
  plan to allow Static Line to grow any larger than it needs to.

                --Coplan


--=--=--
--=--=------=--=------=--=----
  Your View and Response
     Your Favorite Tune
  By:  Coplan
----=--=------=--=------=--=--

     It wasn't long ago that I met an observer of the scene on #trax: a
  guy who goes by alias Invect.  Apparently, he's been observing the scene
  for a relatively short while.  I'm quite surprised about his knowledge
  of the scene.  He's managed to download all the classic tunes by Jase,
  Necros, Skaven, Purple Motion and so on.  I find, more often than not,
  that newbies to the scene often don't get exposed to such classics.

     So Invect had a great idea.  Why not share our thoughts about our
  favorite tracked tunes of all times?  The platform for such a project is
  our very own Static Line.

     So I have a request to all the readers:  Write in and tell us about
  your favorite tracked tune of all time, and tell us why you like it so
  much.

     I'll start:

     My favorite scene tune of all time was "Kingdom Skies" by Jase.  It
  was one of Hornet's Music Competition winners.  But nevermind that.  I
  come from a background of orchestral music, and take to this tune rather
  naturally.  One of the first scene tunes that I downloaded happened to
  be this song.  The samples aren't anything special.  But the arrangement
  is amazing to me.  It's a three part epic piece, and it's very
  inspirational.  I don't really have that many words to describe what I
  feel whenever I hear the tune.  In a scene filled with trance, dnb and
  breakbeat tunes (among other techno styles), orchestral tunes are few
  and far between.  This tune has always been my inspiration for me to
  continue my song writing.  So it has always been on my hard drive,  or
  on a cd, or in my MP3 player so that I can play it whenever I feel the
  need.  Inspirational tunes such as this need always be remembered.

     So now its your turn.  Write to me and tell me what your favorite
  tune is.  Tell me why you like it.  You can send your thoughts to
  coplan@scenespot.org.  You can also reply directly to this issue, and I
  will recieve your response -- it will not be posted to the mailing list,
  as I have it blocked.  But I will still get a copy of the message you
  sent.

     I look forward to your recommendations.

                --Coplan


--=--=--
--=--=------=--=------=--=----
  SceneSpot Update
     V.3 Details
  By:  Coplan
----=--=------=--=------=--=--

     SceneSpot, the sister project to Static Line, has been making some
  great strides.  The last time I came to you, we had begun work on
  version 2.  For better or for worse, we have completely abandoned that
  interface, and we are now almost ready to bring Version 3 to the
  public.

     Realizing how much work was involved in recreating the wheel, as it
  were, we changed our structure a bit.  We are no longer coding SceneSpot
  from scratch.  We have decided, instead, to put an existing content
  management syste (CMS) into place as a core for the site.  By doing so,
  we have been able to focus more of our efforts on the more important
  things such as content, modules and support.

     So what can you expect of Version 3?  Initially, there will be some
  trade-offs when it comes to features.  The HTML version of Static Line
  will not be fully available at first.  You can still read each issue
  from our ftp server (text only) and from our mail archives (HTML).  But
  it won't be searchable.  Tune Tracker will also temporarily be
  unavailable, as the new core doesn't natively support the modules we
  created for the original SceneSpot.  Fear not, however, as we do plan to
  fully re-introduce these features in the futre as modules for the new
  core.

     Once we go live with the new version of the site, you will
  immediately notice a couple of differences.  You will now be able to
  respond to news briefs that are posted on SceneSpot.  We will also have
  a complete forum system in place where you can talk about the latest
  issues (or, perhaps, nothing in particular) in the forum topic of your
  choice.  The interactivity of the forum system will help you to learn
  more about your hobby and about your fellow sceners.  And we will
  continue to maintain bookmarks, though in a slightly different manner.

     We are pretty sure that you'll like the changes that we've made.  The
  new site should debut before the next issue of Static Line.  If you are
  already a member of SceneSpot, your account settings will follow you to
  the new site.  You can use your old login id and password as if nothing
  ever happened.  But when you do log in, you'll have the ability to
  change much more than you're used to.

     So keep an eye out for the new site.  And, as always, feel free to
  send your feedback as you see necessary to:  coplan@scenespot.org.

                --Coplan


--=--=--
--=--=------=--=------=--=----
  In Tune
     Setec's "White"
  By:  Coplan
----=--=------=--=------=--=--

  -=- Introduction -=-
     Because of the very nature of my position, I make a strong effort to
  not review tunes from associates or close friends.  One could say
  without an stating an untruth that I am quite strict on my friends'
  music when it comes to public reviews.  But every once in a while, one
  of my buddies has to go and release a tune that I cannot resist writing
  about.  This time, it was Setec.

     Damn him.

  -=- "White" by Setec -=-
  "White" is a pretty mellow electronic tune.  Setec's own words would
  describe it best in one sentence:  "[It's] a calm electronic piece to
  close your eyes to."

  If you aren't familiar with Setec's music, it should be known that he's
  often the experimental type.  I can imagine this man sitting back and
  twiddling with knobs and pressing buttons for hours on end just to see
  what kind of cool riff he can whip out.  And then he goes and writes a
  tune around it.  But I digress.

  White is definately an experimental piece.  I don't think he made any
  effort to hold to any form.  The tune doesn't really hold to any
  particular definition of music styles.  But it definately has some
  influences from the ambient styles.  The chord progression is very
  subtle.  Unless you're looking, it's probably not likely you'll notice
  the progression.  Simple is the name of the game.  The leads are simple,
  the chorus is simple and so on.  The complexity of this tune actually
  lies within the background:  A few quick piano riffs here and there, a
  whole bunch of glass/mallet instruments and so on.  Some of that stuff
  is so subtle that it doesn't even distract you from the rest of the
  song.  And the baseline riffs are so simple that you get the idea Setec
  put it there purely to give depth to the song.  But isn't that what a
  baseline is for?

     I have to point out the percussion work that he has done.  Regardless
  of whether he admits it or not, percussion is one of Setec's strengths,
  and this song is no exception.  Let us break it apart.  The base drum
  is simple in form, only a couple of well-placed hits here and there.
  The high-hats and cymbols, some of the first percussion you hear in the
  song, is also relatively simple.  You will notice that he uses two sizes
  of ride cymbols in addition to the high-hat.  I point this out not
  because he's unique.  This should be expected in almost any song.  It's
  very rare for a professional to use any less than two size rides...why
  should you?  Anyhow, the snare riffs are something to listen for.  Yet
  again, nothing truly complicated.  But it's not the typical pattern
  you'd hear.  His riffs, his percussion work in general, sounds as though
  it could've been recorded by a real drummer in a real studio.  Real
  drummers don't do the predictable Snare-Base-Snare-Base loops with the
  lull of ride cymbols being overly repetative in the background.  Real
  drummers get creative with their work.

     The song, in general, has a soothing effect on the spirit.  I like to
  consider this style of music as a mental massage.  It pulsates.  Some
  parts are harder, other parts are much more subtle and subdued.  The
  higher pitched instruments jump in and out, and not in any sort of
  pattern at all.  The song isn't predictable; there is always something
  changing.  You aren't dragged through the song, you get to explore the
  song.  You feel as though you're discovering things when you listen to
  it.  Having listened to the whole thing, I feel as though I've
  accomplished and learned so much.

     This is a must have for any Setec or Ambient fans.  If you're looking
  for something to help you relax, this song is for you as well.


  Song Information:
     Title:  White
     Author:  Setec
     Release date:  27 October, 2002
     Length:  4:50
     File Size:  6.65 MB
     Source:  http://www.scenespot.org/~jesper

                --Coplan

     "In Tune" is a regular column dedicated to the review of original and
  singular works by fellow trackers.  It is to be used as a tool to expand
  your listening and writing horizons, but should not be used as a general
  rating system.  Coplan's opinions are not the opinions of the Static
  Line Staff.

     If you have heard a song you would like to recommend (either your own,
  or another person's), We can be contacted through e-mail useing the
  addresses found in the closing notes.  Please do not send files attached
  to e-mail without first contacting us.  Thank you!


--=--=--
--=--=------=--=------=--=----
  The Lineup
  By:  Novus
----=--=------=--=------=--=--

     Welcome to the first edition of The Lineup! Every month, I scour
  through the  hundreds of new releases on the scene's major archive sites
  to find the best  new music, saving you the trouble of having to
  download 20 instant-delete  songs to find 1 that's worth keeping.

     For now, I'm keeping this as a one-man project just for simplicity,
  but in the future I may ask for volunteers to help me cover more
  websites and to offer more musical opinions than just my own.

     I'm also looking for feedback from you folks on how good a job I'm
  doing so far. Are the songs listed in The Lineup as good as you were
  hoping they'd be? Do I need stricter standards? Looser standards? More
  openness to other genres? E-mail me at vince_young@hotmail.com and
  sound off!

     In the meantime, you may consider the following 39 tunes to be the
  best tracks of October 2002:

  "A Moment In Tears" - Norma Segui & J Graham - fantasy
  http://www.watson.org/mods2/C/cc_amit.xm.zip

  "Airwalking" - Astar - trance
  http://www.watson.org/mods2/new/trx_airwalking.xm.zip
  http://www.watson.org/mods2/T/trx_airwalking.xm.zip

  "Altair" - Vibe - electronica
  http://www.watson.org/mods2/V/vibe-alt.it.zip

  "Ambidreams" - DJ Distance - fantasy
  http://www.watson.org/mods2/C/cc_ambi.xm.zip

  "Black Life" - Black F - ambient
  http://www.watson.org/mods2/B/bf_p6.it.zip

  "Breach In The Wall" - Tripper - electronica
  http://www.watson.org/mods2/B/breach.xm.zip

  "City Of The Damned" - Pro-Xex - gothic rock
  http://www.watson.org/mods2/C/c_o_d.it.zip

  "Counterpoint: Dance Mix" - Hyo Chan - dance
  http://www.watson.org/mods2/new/hyo-co.it.zip
  http://www.watson.org/mods2/H/hyo-co.it.zip

  "Crack" - Energy - electronica
  http://www.watson.org/mods2/new/a-------.it.zip
  http://www.watson.org/mods2/A/a-------.it.zip

  "Dansze Mucyka" - Reed - disco
  http://www.watson.org/mods2/new/dansze.xm.zip
  http://www.watson.org/mods2/D/dansze.xm.zip

  "Digital Shadows" - Vibe - electronica
  http://www.watson.org/mods2/V/vibe-ds.it.zip

  "For Honour And Glory" - Cooth - orchestral
  http://www.watson.org/mods2/new/honour.xm.zip
  http://www.watson.org/mods2/H/honour.xm.zip

  "Heavy Metal" - SaxxonPike - breakbeat
  http://www.watson.org/mods2/new/spk_hvmt.xm.zip
  http://www.watson.org/mods2/S/spk_hvmt.xm.zip

  "Insomnia" - Storm - trance
  http://www.homemusic.cc/Songs/songs.get.php?soId=1583

  "Jacked Up" - Peter Kasting - pop
  http://www.watson.org/mods2/new/jacked.it.zip
  http://www.watson.org/mods2/J/jacked.it.zip

  "Joy" - Zanoma - dance
  http://www.watson.org/mods2/new/znm-joy.it.zip
  http://www.watson.org/mods2/Z/znm-joy.it.zip

  "Last Minute" - Maim - pop
  http://www.watson.org/mods2/new/maim_-_lami.it.zip
  http://www.watson.org/mods2/M/maim_-_lami.it.zip

  "Less Distraction" - Cybelius - pop/rock
  http://www.watson.org/mods2/new/distract.s3m.zip
  http://www.watson.org/mods2/D/distract.s3m.zip

  "Little Dancing Glove Puppet" - Core-Nick - pop/ballad
  http://www.watson.org/mods2/new/ttk-ldgp.xm.zip
  http://www.watson.org/mods2/T/ttk-ldgp.xm.zip

  "London Taxi" - Louigi Verona - progressive pop
  http://www.watson.org/mods2/L/londontaxi8bit.it.zip

  "Lonely Falcon" - Crusader - demostyle
  http://www.watson.org/mods2/new/lonefalc.it.zip
  http://www.watson.org/mods2/L/lonefalc.it.zip

  "Mooltrull" - DCE - electronica
  http://www.watson.org/mods2/new/mooltrull.xm.zip
  http://www.watson.org/mods2/M/mooltrull.xm.zip

  "Next In Line" - Cybelius - pop/rock
  http://www.watson.org/mods2/new/next.s3m.zip
  http://www.watson.org/mods2/N/next.s3m.zip

  "Nightvision" - Sandman - demostyle
  http://www.watson.org/mods2/new/k_vision.s3m.zip
  http://www.watson.org/mods2/K/k_vision.s3m.zip

  "No Fate" - Em - metal
  http://www.watson.org/mods2/N/no_fate.it.zip

  "Oceans Of Eternity" - Hyo Chan - dance
  http://www.watson.org/mods2/new/hyo-oce.it.zip
  http://www.watson.org/mods2/H/hyo-oce.it.zip

  "Over The Ruby Sky" - Vibe - demostyle
  http://www.watson.org/mods2/V/vibe-trs.it.zip

  "Restricted Area" - Ivory - electronica
  http://www.watson.org/mods2/R/rarea.it.zip

  "Scenery" - Cybelius - pop
  http://www.watson.org/mods2/new/scenery.s3m.zip
  http://www.watson.org/mods2/N/scenery.s3m.zip

  "Shilkyrie" - Tommi - fantasy
  http://www.homemusic.cc/Songs/songs.get.php?soId=1581

  "So, My Heart" - Arenos - ballad
  http://www.watson.org/mods2/M/myheart.xm.zip

  "Space Phear" - SaxxonPike - techno
  http://www.watson.org/mods2/new/spk_spac.s3m.zip
  http://www.watson.org/mods2/S/spk_spac.s3m.zip

  "Spouser" - Tekido-81 - trance
  http://www.watson.org/mods2/new/tkd_spou.xm.zip
  http://www.watson.org/mods2/T/tkd_spou.xm.zip

  "The Black Hole" - Maim - dance
  http://www.watson.org/mods2/new/maim_-_black.it.zip
  http://www.watson.org/mods2/M/maim_-_black.it.zip

  "The Grip" - Zond 3 - electronica
  http://www.homemusic.cc/Songs/songs.get.php?soId=1562

  "The Love Trap" - Anvil - demostyle
  http://www.watson.org/mods2/new/lovetrp.xm.zip
  http://www.watson.org/mods2/L/lovetrp.xm.zip

  "The Real Beginning" - Beyond - fantasy
  http://www.watson.org/mods2/B/beyond-t.xm.zip

  "Wish On A Star" - DJ Distance - dance
  http://www.watson.org/mods2/C/cc_woas.xm.zip

  "Zedanotrops" - Bradford - dance
  http://www.watson.org/mods2/new/zedanotrops.it.zip
  http://www.watson.org/mods2/Z/zedanotrops.it.zip

     Take care!

                --Novus


--=--=--
--=--=------=--=------=--=----
  Screen Lit Vertigo
     Variform by Kewlers and The S by Suspend
  By:  Seven
----=--=------=--=------=--=--

  -=- "Variform" by Kewlers -=-
  (party version)

  Found at www.scene.org
  3th place at the Assembly 2002 democompo

  System Requirements:
     PII (yes, two) or better, OpenGL 3D card with 16 MB and large texture
  support (GeForce2 with 32 mb or better recommended), 32 MB RAM, 9MB HD

  Test Machine: PIII 900 640MB, SB1024, Radeon 8500 LE 64MB, Win98

  The Credits:
     Code: Curly Brace
     Music: Mel Function, Little Bitchard
     2D: Actor Dolban
     3D: Curly Brace

  The Demo:
     Kewlers newest demo is one of the reasons I'm glad I went to
  Assembly:  It's really great to watch it on the bigscreen. Variform is a
  pure effect demo:  No story or 3D environments, but almost 20 different
  parts in 6 minutes. It has a very solid design with such main
  ingredients as grey moir‚ patterns, a color scheme going from green over
  electric blue to purple, and more cubes than you can shake a stick at.
  The style reminds me of MFX's "super luxus lemmen paketti", especially
  the mozaic appearing around and over the abstract objects. Most effects
  are quite original, such as the tunnel of pitch black cubes, mirroring
  lots of white lights, or the morphing object in front of a big
  lightsource. There are a few full-screen images used as a background,
  mostly at the start. Maybe they ran out of inspiration as there are too
  many black backgrounds towards the end, in my opinion. The pictures show
  people and a face, made more angular to fit with the cubist effects. A
  cute little flower with polygon-leaves makes a few appearances too. The
  techno-font used for the intro, the credits and the greetings is hardly
  readable, but that doesn't matter since they're also spoken aloud by a
  synthetic voice. It's intonation is very monotone, although that doesn't
  bother me much. The music reminds me of Kraftwerk. It's an electronic
  tune with a lot of variation. My favourite part is the break after the
  greetings; the part showing those purple half-transparent,
  half-reflective diamond clusters with bells playing a sweet melody;
  after which the drums come back in full force. The synchronizing with
  the effects is excellent, although less flashes wouldn't have hurt.

  Overall:
     Lots of people say Variform should have won the Assembly democompo.
  But I think that it's a matter of taste. The top 3 were all very good, but
  very different, demos. So, quarrelling about the ranking is useless. If
  you haven't watched Variform yet because it placed "only" 3rd, you
  should redeem your error ASAP. Even if electronica isn't your style. For
  such a demo, the hardware requirements are quite low, and I've heard it
  runs even on TNT-class cards. My only peeve is that there are two
  "features" (text in the background at the start looks messed up, and an
  object with half it's polys being solid grey) that I'm not sure if they
  are ATI-driver bugs or if it's supposed to look like that. But it
  doesn't really matter, they fit the experimental style anyway :)


  -=- "The S" by Suspend -=-
  (final version)

  Found at ftp://ftp.klosz.art.pl/pub/scene/incoming (still there at 31 Oct)
  2nd place in the Symphony 2002 democompo, final released out of compo at
  Abstract 2002

  System Requirements: 7MB HD, Windows, Geforce or better.

  Test Machine: PIII 900 640MB, SB1024, Radeon 8500 LE 64MB, Win98

  The Credits:
     Code: Booncol
     Gfx: Insane, Mantra, Mime, Statique
     Music: Raiden

  The Demo:
     The S is a very energetic, brightly colored effect demo, with at
  least two effects going on at all times. There are radial-blurred
  metaballs on a background of waving cubes, and a sphere of transparant
  cubes folding back into itself while a booming speaker sprays square
  particles around. The best part is a rotating silver blob with *lots* of
  red-hot hairs attached to it while some transparant spheres pulsate in a
  matrix-configuration. Besides the "big" effects, there are also little
  design touches such as the spinning logo in the corner or the rotating
  circle segments. At some places removing effects would IMHO actually
  improve the demo: the hard flashes during the stumping cylinders hurt
  the eyes, and the horizontal/vertical noise lines don't add anything
  (besides having more moving stuff on the screen at the same time).
  Another thing that starts to annoy me (it applies to many modern demos,
  Variform f.e. too): could you please, pretty please, use something
  different than cubes for your mass-movement effects? It's really getting
  dull, I know they're easy to do but try some pyramids or octahedrons or
  whatever for a change.

     Something I haven't seen in demos for ages are full-screen
  stand-alone images, and this demo has plenty of them: Some splendid
  "Suspend" and "The S" logos, a green loading screen with a giant fly,
  and two girl faces which are a bit bland but with very detailed hair.
  Behind such, a particle effect emerges and a dark composition with
  knife-like fingers resting on a cheek. The music reminds me of the
  604/AND demo soundtrack: a very fast-paced techno/goa piece packed with
  bass and percussion. There are some radio-like voice samples in there;
  but with so much echo, I can't understand them. The music fits the
  succession of flashy effects perfectly, but there are so many beats
  flowing through each other that the synchronizing sometimes feels wrong,
  especially if you're concentrating on a different beat.

  Overall:
     This little gem of a demo is easy to overlook as it hasn't competed
  in a big party. But it's worth giving a shot. It has good effects,
  excellent pictures and a nice soundtrack. There are some minor bad
  points (no clear design, a few parts repeat or are too long), but
  nothing that really stands in the way. Several people have complained on
  pouet.net that it is unstable, especially with ATI cards, but I haven't
  noticed any problems (using the latest drivers). There's already a
  patched exe available at the URL above, though you still need the data
  from the original file.

                --Seven


--=--=--
--=--=------=--=------=--=----
  Editorial
     Scene Vs. Scene:  The OS Debate
  By: Coplan
----=--=------=--=------=--=--

     It has always been an issue in the scene in some form or another:
  Which Operating System (OS) is better?  In the beginning, it was Amiga
  vs. Commadore and Apple.  Then it somehow turned into Amiga vs. PC (When
  I say PC, I mean MS based OS's).  Now, it's a toss up between PC vs. MAC
  or PC vs. Linux.  I'm not going to give you a concrete answer to that
  solution.  In fact, I won't even give you an answer.  I will simply
  state my views on the issue.

     Based on a very brief amount of research, and that only means that
  I've asked a couple of people, it would be safe to assume that Microsoft
  has the corner on the OS standard, even in the demoscene.  Most people
  are working in windows with whatever aspect of the scene they specialize
  in. Scene coders almost never go to MAC, but it's not uncommon for them
  to gravitate towards Linux.  Musicians in the scene are most likely to
  use MS, but are often tempted by the world of MAC.  Notice I said "in
  the scene".  Professionally, and outside the scene, most musicians are
  using MAC (supposing they use a computer in their productions).  Anyhow,
  when it comes to the OS wars, my age-old addage still rings true:  Tell
  me what you're doing, and then I'll recommend an OS.

     There's one simple fact about each OS relative to the others.
  Whether you want to admit it or not, no OS is the jack-of-all trades.
  Inevitably, a given OS does at least one thing better than the others.
  But this is the demoscene.  We need only concern ourselves about a few
  things.  Yes, contrary to popular belief within the scene, what the
  average scener does is only a fraction of what computers can do.  We are
  purely a multimedia operation.  The scene doesn't care about
  spreadsheets, we don't care about databases, we don't care about the
  internet support (at least not directly associated with our art).  We
  care about audio, video and things that aren't pulled from a computer:
  creativity.  Creativity comes from our minds.  For that reason, it
  doesn't figure into the formula when considering an ideal OS.  So, I
  will ignore this for now.

     So lets take the two important ingredients and look at them from
  different angles.  The sad fact is that programming, graphicians and
  musicians have vastly different requirements when it comes to their
  contributions to the scene.  Let us look at the angle in which each
  contributor will approach an Operating System.

     A programmer wants an interface and a basis for which he can
  communicate  with the OS.  The reality is that this is what he does.  He
  interfaces  with the OS.  That's his job.  To do so, he needs to be able
  to understand the way the OS works.  He needs to be able to tell the OS
  what he wants to do.  He needs a programming language.  Fortunately,
  there are a couple of common programming languages that can be found in
  many places.  C and C++ are among the most commonly used programming
  languages used in the scene.  These can be found almost anywhere, but
  most commonly found on the Microsoft and Unix Based OS's.  But there is
  also the whole issue about libraries.  Most of the libraries available
  for programmers in the Microsoft world are closed, that is to say that
  the programmer does not have access to its code.  This does cause
  problems, and many programmers get frustrated with this fact.  That is
  the reason that many programmers are starting to stray towards open
  sourced OS's like BSD and Linux (both of which come in many flavors).
  Linux offers much flexibility when it comes to libraries.  Most
  libraries available for linux are open sourced, which means that the
  source code is available to the public.  Suddenly, the programmer has
  access to all the tidbits of data and information that he needs from a
  library.  While he could get that info from a closed library, he now
  knows exactly what is happening to his data, because he can much more
  easily trace his programs.  But nevermind that.  The average programmer
  based on an open source OS such as Linux has embraced the open source
  philosophy, and has also offered their source to the public.  It's much
  easier to learn from example than it is from theory.  The programmer has
  a much easier time expanding his abilities in a given language.  And
  that is something that is very appealing from the mind of a programmer.

     Now if you were a musician, you could care less about the source code
  behind your programmers.  If you're fortunate enough to know a
  programming language, you might be able to develop your own tools.  But
  that's not very common, so you learn to make your music with what you
  have.  You want options though, and you don't want your music to be
  limited by what does or does not exist.  While the open source ticket
  seems appealing, the reality is that there isn't much support for the
  music world, yet.  Too many hardware vendors are keeping their drivers
  closed, so finding drivers for your $700 sound card in Linux is
  sometimes difficult.  It is even less likely that the drivers you find
  will support every feature of your card.  If that's not enough, try
  finding some software that will allow you to do everything you want to
  do.  When it comes to music, you have to consider the market leaders in
  audio hardware, and what they support.  MOTU, M-Audio, Echo,
  ST-Audio/Hoontech, Roland and other high-end audio hardware companies
  are supporting MacOS and Windows.  Those are really your only options
  when it comes to music, especially when you get to the world of MIDI.
  And even still, you're more likely to find the support you want in
  MacOS than Windows.  MAC, as it were, has only one standard for audio
  hardware.  As limiting as this might sound, it actually prevents a lot
  of problems across the board.  EMagic, for example, makes some of the
  most popular audio software around.  But they've recently announced
  that they will no longer be writing software for Windows.  If you
  absolutely don't need your computer for anything else, MacOS is often
  the first choice.  Throw your stones, if you wish, but this is a world
  where MP3 is becoming the music medium, even in the scene.  More and
  more demos are using MP3 as it's audio format.  There is nothing that
  says that MP3 can't be created on a Mac.  That being said, if you're a
  tracker, you still gotta work with Windows.  Last I checked, there
  still aren't any good trackers for Mac.  But when it comes to MIDI,
  there's no comparison between MacOS and Windows.  The professionals
  will tell you the same.

     In the graphics world, however, it really comes down to what else you
  want to do with your computer.  There doesn't really seem to be many
  limiting factors for graphic artists in the Linux world.  The Mac world
  started the whole graphics evolution, and it's still pretty popular.
  And Windows can easily compete as well.  It really comes down to what
  tools you want to use, and ultimately what else you want to do.  If you
  just like to sketch, nothing is better than free software, and you can
  get that with The Gimp, which is available for Linux and other Unix
  based OS's.  If you're an old veteran of the Adobe world, then you'll
  need either a Mac or a Windows machine.  Corel users can use almost any
  OS.  If you want to do oldskool ANSI art using oldskool ANSI Art
  Programs created by and for the scene, it's Windows (well, DOS) for
  you.  But graphic artists have no room to complain about limitations on
  any OS.  These days, it really doesn't matter.  Lucky you.

     So once again, I have to lay doubt to your thoughts about the best OS
  for the scene.  I'm sorry to say that you cannot win that battle yet,
  regardless of which OS you support.  A scener should learn not to be so
  obtuse.  So pick an OS that you like, and stop shoving it other people's
  faces.  Just realize that your opinions might not work for someone else.
  This is a debate that won't be settled for many years, if at all.

     As a final note, I will tell you, out of fairness, what I use at
  home.  I have three machines:  An 850mhz Laptop running Redhat Linux
  8.0, a 1ghz machine running Redhat Linux 7.3 and a 1.4ghz machine
  running Windows XP.  I'm a musician, web developer and gamer.  My
  laptop is purely a business and development tool.  Having no need for
  music creation on it, I have no need to run windows.  My 1ghz machine
  is the server, the work-horse for my network.  I do most of my web
  development on it, so I need it for databases and web servers.  I play
  games and write music on my Windows based machine.  I'm a firm believer
  that one should use the best tool for the jobs you need done.

                --Coplan


--=--=--
--=--=------=--=------=--=----
  Inside My Mind
     My Addiction
  By:  Vill
----=--=------=--=------=--=--

     Oh those blissful days. High school... a time when I lived in
  complete ignorance. How wonderful! Day after day I would exist without
  money. Paying rent, buying food, worrying about bills etc -- all of these
  things were taken care of for me. The same paradise existed for my
  tracking. At most, I would be pulling in about 50 dollars a week from my
  job at Taco Bell, so my most audacious purchase would be a pokey
  soundcard or a wee little SIMM. Rock on, the true life of a tracker,
  downloading synths, banging on pipes and boxes with a cheap mic for
  drums, picking away at my $100 acoustic guitar... My, how tastes change.

     I should have never trusted that serpent with that apple.

     To use drugs as a comparison, not that I condone substance use (keep
  your face straight, Vill), I went from snorting pixie sticks in high
  school to pumping my veins full of designer heroine in college. That's
  right, the taste of gear, the taste of blood; I am addicted to gear. I
  am like the half-vampire Blade. I have the thirst. Only rather than
  sucking on necks, I would rather frolic around the music shop, twisting
  the knobs on a Nord Lead or rationalizing why I need a $1300 Taylor
  Acoustic with cutaway, electronics, and an ebony fretboard, *saliviate*.

     Acquiring a more "refined" musical creation preference is wonderful.
  But as I sit here looking at my MOTU 828, Roland XP-80, Taylor 310-CE,
  Oxygen 8, amps, strings, cutters, microphones, cables, cables, and
  monster cables, I fear I have crossed the line from hobbyist to...
  whatever. Yeah, the line. Armed with high school ideals, my free copy of
  IT, and a myriad of samples from across the 'net, I remained happily on
  the hobbyist side of the line. Now, as most of my disposable income (as
  well as some necessity income) feeds my gear addiction, I like to
  pretend that $150 is a big purchase for something like a soundcard, but
  alas, my headphone monitors cost that much.

     Mind you, I have the same amount of insane wealth, insurmountable
  fame, and armies of fans that I did when I was tracking for free: ZERO.
  Instead, since I poured all this money into my "hobby", I now feel
  pressured to create music. While I flip all the switches and load Reason
  and Logic, I sometimes feel like I'm at work. This horrible realization
  leads to white-noise frustration. I find myself mastering a song even
  before it's done by tweaking silly reverb settings and cleaning hi-hats
  to the point of audiophile status. The groove funky chile, concentrate
  of the groove my personal George Clinton voice bop-guns at me. Alas, all
  these voices, all these expenses, the fun has been sucked out of
  composing. Hell, I don't even have that bouncy high school girlfriend to
  write tribute songs to. You know you did it too, so stop laughing.

     So I turn to my Guide in horror as he shows me the 808th circle of
  hell, the gear circle. Here, walls of rack mounts and hyperactive mixer
  boards attack nerdy musicians just like myself. "Begone compressors!
  Unnngh!" I witness one poor soul being bound by MIDI cables and ravaged
  by angry inspiration stealing demons. How!? Why? What can I do to avoid
  this fate? I plead. My guide stares straight ahead at the river of bad
  VST instruments as he hands me a coffee can. I find myself in the middle
  of my apartment, sitting cross-legged with the can on my lap. I wrap the
  top with my thumbs, (bum bum bup) and then I flick the sides (ting
  ting). I smile, wail on the can for a good fifteen minutes, and regain
  the simplicity and fun that so often inspires and motivates me.

     Amidst the gear and complexities, it is lucrative to take a step back
  and realize the basic foot-tapping that goes into almost every song.
  Unless you're an experimental musician, in which case, light that crack
  rock and go nuts. I'm kidding! Really!

     As always, with all the screaming, vile thoughts and ear-covering,
  head-thrashing goodness; I hope you enjoyed being inside my mind.

                --Vill


--=--=--
--=--=------=--=------=--=----
  Early Dawn Reflections
     Jobs
  By: The Watcher
----=--=------=--=------=--=--

     Another early Saturday morning, and once again I find myself bathing
  in the soothingly bright light emitting from my monitor... nothing beats
  staring at notepad on an empty stomach (do note that anything positive I
  might ever say about notepad is me being sarcastic, I've just never
  gotten around to installing a decent text-editor here at home). Today I
  would like to discuss those most wretched real-life activities of all,
  culprit number one in distracting us from hour scene activities: jobs.

     While reading the following, please keep in mind that I am one of
  those sceners that, even though they consider themselves active, never
  seem to produce anything. At all. So if you are one of those hyperactive
  sceners that release 20 demos or 50+ tracks a year, submitting multiple
  productions for every contest at every demoparty (giving varying fake
  group names to avoid suspicion), none of the undermentioned may appeal
  to you. Not that I care, because I hate you anyway for making me feel
  incredibly inadequate *grin*.

     Basically, i think it is possible to divide most jobs out there into
  two simple categories: challenging ones and boring ones. Both can be
  equally hazardous for your scene-productivity. To illustrate this, I'll
  take myself as an example (ego and id always make for easy writing
  material).

     Once upon a time (I'm talking about a far away past here) I was
  working as a data processor, spending all day entering vacancies into an
  online job-database. Clearly, this would fit into the 'boring' category.
  Note that it was definitely not a _bad_ job. I had lots of fun
  socializing with my co-workers during the day, and loads of energy to
  spare during the evenings (in other works, I was a hyperactive ball of
  nerves by the time I got home, but that could just have been the huge
  intake of coffee during the day). But in spite of all this energy, I
  never got around to code much, mainly because I had no inspiration
  whatsoever. And ever so often it would hit me, especially after an
  evening spend gaming, feeling guilty for not spending any time coding...
  'What have I achieved today?' And the answer was always the same:
  'nothing worthwhile'.

     I think lots of sceners will recognize the above, being bored to
  death working day after day at some silly nine-to-five job like I did.
  Looking back, you realize that you had so much spare time in those days,
  wasted away watching TV, playing games, chatting on the internet... to
  cut it short, you might as well have been [funny stuff here], because
  you sure didn't get any scene-work done. Same goes for a lot of sceners
  still 'enjoying' our educational system by the way.

     And then I changed jobs. I became a programmer at a small firm
  working at a very, very high level. Suddenly I had to push myself to the
  edge day in day out, just to keep up with my colleagues. I now face new
  challenges every day, constantly feel inspired by the things I get to
  do, ideas for at least a thousand demos ready at hand... but now I don't
  have any time left, nor the energy, to do any scene-stuff.

     So this is what it all comes down to: no matter what job you take,
  you won't get any scene-work done. Period.

                --The Watcher

  P.S.: I had big plans to do a review of the 10 best christmas-themed
  demoscene intros ever, but after first spending over 2 hours searching
  for material (is it me or has the motivation to do
  holiday-fun-productions somehow diminished after say 1996?), then losing
  another hour rebooting my PC trying to get these obviously hastily
  hacked-together executables to run, only to be disappointed by the sheer
  lack of quality and originality, I gave up. Now I am trying to compile a
  list of the 10 most boring intros ever, any suggestions anyone?


--=--=--
--=--=------=--=------=--=----
  Link List
----=--=------=--=------=--=--

  Portals:

      SceneSpot (Home of Static Line).......http://www.scenespot.org
      CFXweb.......................................http://cfxweb.net
      Czech Scene................................http://www.scene.cz
      Danish Scene..............................http://demo-scene.dk
      Demoscene.org.........................http://www.demoscene.org
      Demo.org...................................http://www.demo.org
      Diskmag.de...................................http://diskmag.de
      Hungarian Scene........................http://www.scene-hu.com
      Italian Scene...........................http://run.to/la_scena
      ModPlug Central Resources..........http://www.castlex.com/mods
      Norwegian Scene........................http://www.demoscene.no
      Orange Juice.............................http://www.ojuice.net
      Planet Zeus..........................http://www.planetzeus.net
      Polish Scene...........................http://www.demoscena.pl
      Pouet.net.................................http://www.pouet.net
      Russian Scene..........................http://www.demoscene.ru
      Scene.org.................................http://www.scene.org
      Scenet....................................http://www.scenet.de
      Spanish Scene............................http://www.escena.org
      Swiss Scene..............................http://www.chscene.ch

  Archives:

      Acid2.....................................ftp://acid2.stack.nl
      Amber.......................................ftp://amber.bti.pl
      Cyberbox.....................................ftp://cyberbox.de
      Hornet (1992-1996)........................ftp://ftp.hornet.org
      Scene.org..................................ftp://ftp.scene.org
      Scene.org Austra........................ftp://ftp.au.scene.org
      Scene.org Netherlands...................ftp://ftp.nl.scene.org
      Swiss Scene FTP...........................ftp://ftp.chscene.ch

  Demo Groups:

      3g Design..............................http://3gdesign.cjb.net
      3State...................................http://threestate.com
      7 Gods.........................................http://7gods.sk
      Aardbei.....................................http://aardbei.com
      Acid Rain..............................http://surf.to/acidrain
      Addict..................................http://addict.scene.pl
      Agravedict........................http://www.agravedict.art.pl
      Alien Prophets.....................http://www.alienprophets.dk
      Anakata..............................http://www.anakata.art.pl
      Astral..............................http://astral.scene-hu.com
      Astroidea........................http://astroidea.scene-hu.com
      BlaBla..............................http://blabla.planet-d.net
      Blasphemy..............................http://www.blasphemy.dk
      Bomb..................................http://bomb.planet-d.net
      Broncs..................................http://broncs.scene.cz
      Byterapers.....................http://www.byterapers.scene.org
      Bypass.................................http://bypass.scene.org
      Calodox.................................http://www.calodox.org
      Cocoon..............................http://cocoon.planet-d.net
      Confine.................................http://www.confine.org
      Damage...................................http://come.to/damage
      Dc5.........................................http://www.dc5.org
      Delirium..............................http://delirium.scene.pl
      Eclipse............................http://www.eclipse-game.com
      Elitegroup..........................http://elitegroup.demo.org
      Exceed...........................http://www.inf.bme.hu/~exceed
      Fairlight.............................http://www.fairlight.com
      Fobia Design...........................http://www.fd.scene.org
      Freestyle............................http://www.freestylas.org
      Fresh! Mindworks...................http://kac.poliod.hu/~fresh
      Future Crew..........................http://www.futurecrew.org
      Fuzzion.................................http://www.fuzzion.org
      GODS...................................http://www.idf.net/gods
      Halcyon...........................http://www.halcyon.scene.org
      Haujobb..................................http://www.haujobb.de
      Hellcore............................http://www.hellcore.art.pl
      Infuse...................................http://www.infuse.org
      Kilobite...............................http://kilobite.cjb.net
      Kolor................................http://www.kaoz.org/kolor
      Komplex.................................http://www.komplex.org
      Kooma.....................................http://www.kooma.com
      Mandula.........................http://www.inf.bme.hu/~mandula
      Maturefurk...........................http://www.maturefurk.com
      Monar................ftp://amber.bti.pl/pub/scene/distro/monar
      MOVSD....................................http://movsd.scene.cz
      Nextempire...........................http://www.nextempire.com
      Noice.....................................http://www.noice.org
      Orange.................................http://orange.scene.org
      Orion................................http://orion.planet-d.net
      Outbreak................................http://www.outbreak.nu
      Popsy Team............................http://popsyteam.rtel.fr
      Prone................................http://www.prone.ninja.dk
      Purple....................................http://www.purple.dk
      Rage........................................http://www.rage.nu
      Replay.......................http://www.shine.scene.org/replay
      Retro A.C...........................http://www.retroac.cjb.net
      Sista Vip..........................http://www.sistavip.exit.de
      Skytech team............................http://www.skytech.org
      Spinning Kids......................http://www.spinningkids.org
      Sunflower.......................http://sunflower.opengl.org.pl
      Talent.............................http://talent.eurochart.org
      The Black Lotus.............................http://www.tbl.org
      The Digital Artists Wired Nation.http://digitalartists.cjb.net
      The Lost Souls...............................http://www.tls.no
      TPOLM.....................................http://www.tpolm.com
      Trauma.................................http://sauna.net/trauma
      T-Rex.....................................http://www.t-rex.org
      Unik........................................http://www.unik.de
      Universe..........................http://universe.planet-d.net
      Vantage..................................http://www.vantage.ch
      Wipe....................................http://www.wipe-fr.org

  Music Labels, Music Sites:

      Aisth.....................................http://www.aisth.com
      Aural Planet........................http://www.auralplanet.com
      Azure...................................http://azure-music.com
      Blacktron Music Production...........http://www.d-zign.com/bmp
      BrothomStates.............http://www.katastro.fi/brothomstates
      Chill..........................http://www.chillproductions.com
      Chippendales......................http://www.sunpoint.net/~cnd
      Chiptune...............................http://www.chiptune.com
      Da Jormas................................http://www.jormas.com
      Fabtrax......http://www.cyberverse.com/~boris/fabtrax/home.htm
      Fairlight Music.....................http://fairlight.scene.org
      Five Musicians.........................http://www.fm.scene.org
      Fusion Music Crew.................http://members.home.nl/cyrex
      Goodstuff..........................http://artloop.de/goodstuff
      Hellven.................................http://www.hellven.org
      Ignorance.............................http://www.ignorance.org
      Immortal Coil.............................http://www.ic.l7.net
      Intense...........................http://intense.ignorance.org
      Jecoute.................................http://jecoute.cjb.net
      Kosmic Free Music Foundation.............http://www.kosmic.org
      Lackluster.....................http://www.m3rck.net/lackluster
      Level-D.................................http://www.level-d.com
      Mah Music.............................http://come.to/mah.music
      Maniacs of noise...............http://home.worldonline.nl/~mon
      MAZ's sound homepage..................http://www.maz-sound.com
      Med.......................................http://www.med.fr.fm
      Miasmah.............................http://www.miasmah.cjb.net
      Milk.......................................http://milk.sgic.fi
      Mo'playaz..........................http://ssmedion.de/moplayaz
      Mono211.................................http://www.mono211.com
      Morbid Minds..............http://www.raveordie.com/morbidminds
      Moods.............................http://www.moodymusic.de.vu/
      Noise................................http://www.noisemusic.org
      Noerror.......................http://www.error-404.com/noerror
      One Touch Records......................http://otr.planet-d.net
      Park..................................http://park.planet-d.net
      pHluid..................................http://phluid.acid.org
      Radical Rhythms.....http://www.andrew.cmu.edu/user/merrelli/rr
      RBi Music.............................http://www.rbi-music.com
      Ruff Engine................http://members.xoom.com/ruff_engine
      SHR8M......................................http://1st.to/shr8m
      Sound Devotion................http://sugarbomb.x2o.net/soundev
      Soundstate.........................http://listen.to/soundstate
      Sunlikamelo-D...........http://www.error-404.com/sunlikamelo-d
      Suspect Records........................http://www.tande.com/sr
      Tequila........................http://www.defacto2.net/tequila
      Tempo................................http://tempomusic.cjb.net
      Tetris....................................http://msg.sk/tetris
      Theralite...........................http://theralite.avalon.hr
      Tokyo Dawn Records........................http://tokyodawn.org
      Triad's C64 music archive.............http://www.triad.c64.org
      UltraBeat.........................http://www.innerverse.com/ub
      Vibrants................................http://www.vibrants.dk
      Wiremaniacs.........................http://www.wiremaniacs.com
      Zen of Tracking.........................http://surf.to/the-imm

  Programming:

      Programming portal......................http://www.gamedev.net
      Programming portal.....................http://www.flipcode.com
      Game programming portal...............http://www.gamasutra.com
      3D programming portal.................http://www.3dgamedev.com
      Programming portal......................http://www.exaflop.org
      Programming portal............http://www.programmersheaven.com
      Programming portal.....................http://www.freecode.com
      NASM (free Assembly compiler)......http://www.cryogen.com/nasm
      LCC (free C compiler).........http://www.remcomp.com/lcc-win32
      PTC video engine.........................http://www.gaffer.org
      3D engines..........http://cg.cs.tu-berlin.de/~ki/engines.html
      Documents...............http://www.neutralzone.org/home/faqsys
      File format collection...................http://www.wotsit.org

  Magazines:

      Amber...............................http://amber.bti.pl/di_mag
      Amnesia...............http://amnesia-dist.future.easyspace.com
      Demojournal....................http://demojournal.planet-d.net
      Eurochart.............................http://www.eurochart.org
      Heroin...................................http://www.heroin.net
      Hugi........................................http://www.hugi.de
      Music Massage......................http://www.scene.cz/massage
      Jurassic Pack...........................www.jurassicpack.de.vu
      Pain..................................http://pain.planet-d.net
      Scenial...........................http://www.scenial.scene.org
      Shine...............................http://www.shine.scene.org
      Static Line................http://www.scenespot.org/staticline
      Sunray..............................http://sunray.planet-d.net
      TUHB.......................................http://www.tuhb.org
      WildMag..................................http://www.wildmag.de

  Parties:

      Assembly (Finland).....................http://www.assembly.org
      Ambience (The Netherlands)..............http://www.ambience.nl
      Dreamhack (Sweden)....................http://www.dreamhack.org
      Buenzli (Switzerland)......................http://www.buenz.li
      Gravity (Poland)............http://www.demoscena.cp.pl/gravity
      Mekka-Symposium (Germany)...................http://ms.demo.org
      Takeover (The Netherlands).............,http://www.takeover.nl
      The Party (Denmark).....................http://www.theparty.dk

  Others:

      Demo secret parts....http://www.inf.bme.hu/~mandula/secret.txt
      Textmode Demo Archive.................http://tmda.planet-d.net
      Arf!Studios..........................http://www.arfstudios.org
      #coders..................................http://coderz.cjb.net
      Demonews Express.........http://www.teeselink.demon.nl/express
      Demo fanclub........................http://jerware.org/fanclub
      Digital Undergrounds.....................http://dug.iscool.net
      Doose charts...............................http://www.doose.dk
      Freax................................http://freax.scene-hu.com
      GfxZone............................http://gfxzone.planet-d.net
      PC-demos explained.....http://www.oldskool.org/demos/explained
      Pixel...................................http://pixel.scene.org
      #trax e-mail list.............................................
         .............http://www.scenespot.org/mailman/listinfo/trax
      Underground Mine.............http://www.spinningkids.org/umine

  IRC Channels:

      Scene.........................................ircnet #thescene
      Programming.....................................ircnet #coders
      Programming....................................efnet #flipcode
      Graphics.........................................ircnet #pixel
      Music.............................................ircnet #trax
      Scene (French)..................................ircnet #demofr
      Programming (French)............................ircnet #codefr
      Graphics (French)..............................ircnet #pixelfr
      Scene (Hungarian)............................ircnet #demoscene
      Programming (Hungarian)......................ircnet #coders.hu
      Programming (German)........................ircnet #coders.ger


--=--=--
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  -=- Staff -=-
  Editor:          Coplan / D. Travis North / coplan@scenespot.org
  Staff Writers:   Coplan / D. Travis North / coplan@scenespot.org
                    Dilvie / Eric Hamilton / dilvie@yahoo.com
                    Novus / Vince Young / vince_young@hotmail.com
                    Psitron / Tim Soderstrom / tigerhawk@stic.net
                    Setec / Jesper Pederson / jesped@post.tele.dk
                    Seven / Stefaan VanNieuwenhuyze/ seven7@writeme.com
                    Tryhuk / Tryhuk Vojtech / vojtech.tryhuk@worldonline.cz
                    Vill / Brian Frank / darkvill@yahoo.com
                    The Watcher / Paul-Jan Pauptit / watcher@tuhb.org
  Tech Consultant: Ranger Rick / Ben Reed / ranger@scenespot.org

  Static Line on the Web:  http://www.scenespot.org/staticline

  Static Line Subscription Management:
     http://www.scenespot.org/mailman/listinfo/static_line


     If you would like to contribute an article to Static Line, be aware
  that we will format your article to 76 columns with two columns at the
  beginning of each line.  Please avoid foul language and high ascii
  characters.  Contributions (Plain Text) should be e-mailed to Coplan
  (coplan@scenespot.org) by the last Friday of each month.  New issues are
  released on the first Sunday of every month.

     See you next month!

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