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_//\\________________________________________________________________________
_\\__T_A_T_I_C___L_I_N_E________________________________________ March, 2002
__\\_________________________________________________________________________
\\//__ Monthly Scene E-Zine ________________________________ 260 Subscribers
_____________________________________________________________________________


--=--=--
--=--=------=--=------=--=----
  Table Of Contents
----=--=------=--=------=--=--
     Opening:
           Message From the Editor
           Letters From Our Readers
     Features:
        Party Report -- WOEST 2002
        Journey Into Midi -- Part I: Culture Shock
     Columns:
        Music:
           In Tune -- Quasimojo's "Main Gauche"
        Demo:
           Screen Lit Vertigo -- "Medium" by einklang.net (party-version)
        General:
           Editorial --
           Link List -- Get Somewhere in the Scene
        Closing:
           Credits

--=--=--
--=--=------=--=------=--=----
  Message From the Editor
----=--=------=--=------=--=--
     Wow, March already. Spring is coming up soon, and the demoscene is
  about to wake from its winter slumber. Winter has traditionally always
  been a slow time for the scene. This year, however, it seems as though
  there is actually a lot of things happening. Maybe it's just my
  perspective, or maybe the scene is really waking up early this year.
  Regardless, I'm glad to say that we're here, ready with our next issue
  of Static Line.

     This month, you will find a couple of interesting articles. Seven
  went off to yet another demo party, WOEST 2002, and came back with
  another party report. I dove into MIDI in January, and I have a little
  article (the first in a mini series) that begins to share my experiences
  with the world of MIDI. In a follow up of last issue's "Challenge for
  2002", I have actually provided some ways in which you too can get
  involved in the scene.

     You got some good reading here.  I hope this new issue brings a big
  smile to your face.

  FYI:  Articles for the next issue of Static Line shall be directed
  towards me no later than March 31st, 2002.

                --Coplan


--=--=--
--=--=------=--=------=--=----
  Party Report
     WOEST 2002
  By: Seven
----=--=------=--=------=--=--

     After the rather bad Ambience 2k1 last year, the organizers of the
  demoscene part of Ambience decided to go back to the roots. WOEST is a
  much smaller party, both in time and in size: it starts on a saturday
  noon, instead of the usual friday evening, and it takes place in a
  former nuclear shelter providing place for at most 150 sceners (instead
  of Hogeschool Venlo's +1000).

     Since WOEST takes place in Venlo, the Netherlands just like Ambience,
  and I'm still living in Ghent, Belgium, with no car, I had to take the
  train to Antwerpen, Belgium with my PC case under my arm (people look
  funny at you when you do that), where Djefke picked me up. Besides a
  14-inch schreen and a keyboard for me, Djefke also stuffed his
  full-tower PC, a laptop, an old Silicon Graphics station, a 14-inch and
  17-inch screen, some hubs, a few headphones and a cooler in his small
  green car. Some people really have too much hardware.

  14:17:
     After a perfect trip, we actually had difficulties first finding the
  parking and then the entrance to the shelter. We paid the 17.50 Euro
  entrance fee, which was the first time the Euro actually DID make my
  life easier (not changing francs to guilders ever again :)) Since we
  both paid 20 EUro, and the orgo at the cashpoint didn't have enough
  change, he simply wrote the due amount on a paper and promised to
  give it to us later, which he did. This may tell you something about the
  size and athmosphere of WOEST.

     While we set up, I noticed less than 20 other sceners in the single
  large room, while 107 people had registered on the website. So we could
  pick a table facing the bigscreen and I didn't have to get up to watch
  during the whole party (lazy? me?). The bigscreen was only 2*2 meters,
  but the soundsystem was almost as equally large. The orgos were showing
  demos such as Boost/Doomsday, VIP2/Popsy Team, Medium/Einklang, Clone
  meets clone/Fudge, etc etc. The bad aspect from this privileged position
  became clear during the techno-styled demos such as Saint/Halcyon & Da
  Jormas, which the Dutchmen like VERY much. We could enjoy the superior
  sound quantity up to and beyond the capacity of our aural nerves.

     We've just finished when a dutch scener comes asking if we have the
  Turbo Pascal programming language with us. He introduces himself as
  Cosmic Trance/FMC, and member of his group wants to learn to code demos.
  It boggles my mind why anyone would use TP (DOS, Mode 13H) to code demos
  in the 21st century, but I still have the proggy on a dusty corner of my
  HD, so I burn it on CD, together with the Denthor tutorials and the rest
  of C:/INFO/DEMOS/EFFECTS.

  15:01:
     Now an orgo is playing the original Castle Wolfenstein 3D on the
  bigscreen. Infinite Reboot is here too, and we have a interesting talk
  about his job, making a prototype game for the XBox. Apparently it costs
  around 10.000 (ten thousand) dollar for an XBox development kit, and
  each XBox game has to be approved of by Microsoft. So I think there's
  little chance that there will ever be a demoscene on the XBox...

     The bigscreen is showing ANSI's now. Pretty cool IMO.

  15:19:
     The rules for the surprise-music-compo are announced: 2-channel mod,
  no real samples but stuff like dlls and such instead. It's a typical
  surprise music requirement that guarantees lots of chiptunes.

  16:49:
     A movie about a gang of robbers trying to break into a Las Vegas
  casino was partly shown, but because few people watch it, more demos are
  shown: Fall Equals Winter/Replay, Just a touch of funk/Digital Murder,
  and more. Avoozl has arrived, with some friends who start working on an
  intro or demo they plan to release. Nice to see, I hope there will be
  enough entries to make some good compos out of it.

  17:14:
     I'm wearing my headphones to protect my vulnerable ears from the
  acoustic attack of Soepkip 7 and a Trepaan demo. The Soepkip series are
  classics in the Dutch scene, but if you don't like gabba music and you
  see a Dutch scener starting one up, stick your finger in your ears and
  run.

  18:33:
     We're back from our hunt for food, and we managed to ambushed some
  kebab. There was a long queue in the small store, but it was too cold
  outside to go somewhere else. BTW, am I getting old or is it normal for
  6-year old toddlers to wear earrings? Anyway, we're back in the sanity
  of WOEST :)

  19:41:
     Everyone is staring at the bigscreen on which several Gameboy Advance
  intros are shown (17 of them on 1 rom-image). FYI, the GBA has a 16-mhz
  32-bit risc-CPU, 384 KB RAM and a 240*160 15-bit screen. Still, the GBA
  scene can show tunnels, bumpmapping, 3D rabbits and of course all kinds
  of oldkool effects. Even the first level of Doom is shown, albeit
  without monsters and with a single texture consisting of black and white
  squares, which make the level look like a giant kitchen :)

  20:54:
     After some searching, I've found Control/Green back and burn it on a
  CD so the orgos can show it. To copy the CD, the orgo tried to start
  windows, only to be greeted by the message "Windows has been
  trepanized"! The audience bursts in laughter: the group Trepaan, famous
  for their bad gabba demos, once made a demo that, when run, silently
  disabled windows because windows is for lamers. Guess which demo the
  organizers unwittingly ran some time before... After typing "win TREPAAN
  RULES" or something like that, windows start correctly again :)

     It's a pity only a small amount of different demos are shown, several
  are already shown twice or three times (such as the Soepkip demos).

  21:50
     The bigscreen shows an Underworld concert. I'm trying to connect to
  the network, but to no avail :( Yes, there is a small network, despite
  what was said on the website (that was only to discourage gamers to
  come).

     There's also an old 386 standing on a lone table which is used as a
  party PC: everyone can write their thoughts on it. Most of it is in
  Dutch of course. Cosmic Trance tries to convince me to write on it, but
  I already have a party report under construction :)

  22:50:
     After messing around in both Linux and Windows, I managed to at least
  see other people on the network, but I can't connect to them :( The
  Underword thingie is over, now some new demos are shown, from TPOLM and
  others.

  23:46:
     Oh my god! An orgo (Freebase if I'm not mistaken) just announced
  the karaoke compo: you've to sing along with a demo with lyrics
  (Hyperventilation, VIP2 or Just a touch of funk) The horror! But they
  can't find enough participants for it, so the idea dies a silent death.

  2:22:
     Just helped Cyrex/Fusion Music Crew with his rotating starfield in
  turbo pascal. It's amazing how hard it is to remember the correct
  formula for a rotation when you haven't used it for a while. Not to
  mention the weird surprises that this ancient language holds in stock if
  you're used to C/C++. After a lot of head-scratching we concluded that
  "random(320) - 160" will never result in a small negative number, only
  in small or huge positive ones <sigh>.

  3:14:
     Beat me repeatedly on the head with a large hammer: I've fixed the
  problem with the network, by ... turning of my firewall <stupid me!>. No
  wonder I couldn't make a connection :) I start leeching some Monty
  Python episodes, while the bigscreen plays Shad, Dose2, Vip2 again,
  Kasparove, Nowhere, Alien Sex Clone and more.

  7:17:
     Not much is happening. The Spaceball movie is shown, really a classic
  on demoparties. Some sceners are trying to make the party report on the
  386 reach the 1000th line, but they run out of inspiration and start to
  write a porn story instead.

  8:28:
     Aha, Tribes/Pulse&Melon is shown. Still a great demo with fantastic
  music. The Fulcrum/Matrix is shown too. I've asked Freebase and
  Ile/Aardbei if there were any surprise coding rules announced. I'm not
  interested anymore in competing, but I'm wondering if I missed them or
  if there weren't any in the first place. It turns out there weren't, but
  Ile ask what I would want for a surprise compo, clearly in an attempt to
  make those the rules. I avoid the question and go back to fleshing out
  this report while Ile tries to convince someone else it's possible to
  make an effect in 64 bytes.

  10:15:
     Just watched Jet Li's The One: not a bad action movie, if you ignore
  the technical/pseudo-scientific holes in it. The story and effects are
  heavily influenced by The Matrix, but it's still enjoyable.

  11:26:
     The documentary "Pirates from Silicon Valley" is shown, about the
  history of the PC, the first Apple computers, the young Bill Gates and
  Steve Jobbs etc. I've seen the series already at university, so I amuse
  myself by wathcing the audience. While they are laughing at the
  stereotypical nerds that are interviewed and with the looks of Bill
  Gates back then, almost everyone is still watching it with some
  fascination, and it draws more attention than any demo shown so far.

  12:27:
     The compos have started, with the music compo first. Ile has taken
  over my PC to code a 64 bytes intro. It seems that there will be a
  surprise coding compo after all, and the rules are: create either an
  effect in 64 bytes, or code a fully compliant SQL-server :)

  13:51:
     The music compo is over, and we can vote immediately by raising
  hands. It's rather chaotic. First we're supposed to vote for only 3
  songs, then we can vote as many times as we want. A second round of
  rasing hands is done to rank the 3 highest songs of the first round.

     Meanwhile my fingers started to itch to code a 64 byte intro too, so
  Ile got himself another PC. Looking for ideas in my old code, I notice a
  160-byte big "cellular automata" effect, which I try to squeeze down to
  64B.

  14:20:
     The graphics and 64K intro compos are over, and it's nice to see how
  many entries there are. 14 songs, 7 graphics, 6 intros... Not bad at all
  for a 60-person party, even though many of them are joke-entries. The
  Synergy intro was the clear winner, almost everyone voted for that one.

     I've already submitted my entry, but I'm not very pleased with it:
  it's only a static one-color screen with a certain pattern on it. After
  seeing the animated effects of Jace/TBL and Ile, and noticing several
  bytes of useless data that were still in the code, I started working on
  it again.

  14:49:
     The surprise music compo was all-chiptunes, of course, and Xam/RVL won
  it. Hint for the others: chiptunes that are hard on the ears will *not*
  get many votes... Three wild demos were shown, and the Gameboy Advance
  demo from Farbrausch got first.

     Next the surprise coding compo starts, with 6 entries, all of which
  requires the compo PC to be rebooted. In the meantime Ile invites Jal,
  the oldest dutch scener, to tell stories about the time when everything
  was much better in the Dutch demoscene :) Ile's entry wins, but I get
  second place. Joy!

  15:30:
     The democompo is last: Farbrausch has made another techno demo in
  their "fr-minus-Nr" series, and Jace/TBL has thrown together several
  disconnected effects, some of which look like Winamp plugins. But the
  fight for the first place is between Intershoelace/Wasniach and
  Partyhack vl/ Lemon vs tpb, with the latter winning with 22 points vs 20
  for the former.

     Djefke and I start packing immediately afterwards. The prize ceremony
  is rather short, as only the first place is rewarded. Since less people
  came than expected, there are no monetary prizes. Instead, the winners
  get chocolate easter bunnies, lollipops, CDs and bratwursten. As
  Freebase said, the important thing is not cheap success but to get
  respect :)

     So, what can I say about WOEST? I think it was definitely worth
  visiting: great atmosphere with 100% sceners, the bigscreen that's
  almost constantly in use, 45 releases (meaning almost 2 out of 3 sceners
  made something), friendly organizers. True, it's much smaller than the
  demised Bizarre or Takeover parties, but I think the increase in
  scene-feeling is worth it. Greets to all people I met there, hope to see
  you at Mekka/Symposium!

     (You can find the results and entries at http://woest.scene.org)

                --Seven


--=--=--
--=--=------=--=------=--=----
  Journey into MIDI
     Part I: Culture Shock
  By: Coplan
----=--=------=--=------=--=--

  -=- Introduction -=-
     My first sound card was a Sound Blaster 16, an industry standard.  I
  knew nothing about MIDI, aside from a couple of MID files that I had on
  my hard drive and the fact that I had a free copy of Cakewalk that came
  with my sound card.  I never got into MIDI very much at that point, and
  I was very naive when it came to the medium.  I wasn't impressed with
  the sound quality, and I didn't really care to experiment with it.  Even
  when I got my Gravis Ultrasound, I still wasn't impressed with MIDI.  I
  never would've given MIDI a chance, had it not been for one guy:  Setec.

     For years, the poor guy tried to convince this stubborn fool into
  getting some sort of MIDI Synth.  The money alone was enough to scare me
  from that thought.  But I was not fully convinced that I liked the sound
  quality.  Eventually, Setec started making recordings for me:  of
  instruments, of things he played, and so on.  I'll admit, I was quite
  surprised at the sound quality.  I didn't expect anything MIDI to be
  that good.  So, I was interested.

     It still took several months, but Setec finally convinced me to buy a
  Roland XP-30.  I'm working in the real world now, and I can afford to
  spoil myself.  So, after Christmas, I bought myself this wonderful peice
  of equipment.

     This article is actually the first among a series that I will write.
  It will be more like a journal of sorts.  I will share with you the
  thoughts that are passing through my mind, and the things that I have
  discovered while learning about MIDI.  Each month, I will keep you
  updated of my findings.  It is my hope that my journey will open more
  eyes to MIDI and maybe get a few more artists on the bandwagon.

     Enjoy!


  -=- Part I:  Culture Shock -=-
     One of the things that sold me on MIDI, specifically the Roland XP-30,
  was the sound quality.  Sure, I had Setec's recordings...but I had to
  physically go down to a music store and play with it before I was fully
  convinced of how good this thing sounded.  I made several visits to the
  local music shop, and spent many hours just playing with the thing.  I
  probably pissed a lot of people off, but with something this expensive,
  I wanted to give it as much of a demo period as I could.  Well, after a
  month of playing with the XP-30, I finally bought one.

     When I got it home, I hooked it directly up to my stereo for a while.
  My computer was in peices, and I hadn't had any new parts yet.  So, I
  played and played with my new toy for a couple of days, until my parts
  arrived.  So I got my computer working again, and I hooked this thing up
  to my computer utilizing the MIDI cables that I had bought.  I strike a
  key, and panic.  I heard nothing going through my computer.  This was
  very disturbing.  So I jumped online, and tried to track down anyone I
  knew who knew MIDI.  As it turns out, I made a common mistake.  The
  truth is, audio from your synth does not travel accross the MIDI cables.
  The only purpose of the MIDI cable is to send MIDI data (not sound)
  between the instruments (or in this case, my computer and my synth).
  So, the reason I wasn't hearing sound was because I didn't have the
  audio hooked into my computer.  After a quick stop to Radio Shack, I was
  finally able to plug my synth directly into my sound card's Line In
  jack.  Now I can hear sound.

     It is also important to know that a MIDI synth has a Local Mode
  setting. Most of the time, it doesn't hurt to have it set to On. That
  is, it will control itself and play a note when you hit a note. If you
  turn this off, it will send the "note on/off" data to the computer...but
  unless something sends the information back to your synth, the audio
  won't be played. If you're using some sort of MIDI sequencer, you might
  have to turn Local Mode off so that you don't get double notes, or in
  some cases hear a couple of different sound patches playing at the same
  time.

     Now before I go on, you must realize that I've been tracking for
  almost 9 years now. I'm pretty set in my music ways, and I'm very
  stubborn. The biggest step for me is realizing that I likely won't be
  able to use Impulse Tracker anymore. Yes, IT has MIDI support. But it
  requires the Sound Blaster MIDI interface, which plugs into your SB's
  game port. I have an SB-Live which already has MIDI ports in it. So I
  was not going to get that MIDI interface. Alas, that prevents me from
  using Impulse Tracker for my MIDI sequencing. That is something very
  scary for me.

     But there is hope. There are a couple of programs out there that I
  can use, and maybe even get used to. I have some demos for Cubase VST
  and Cakewalk's Sonar. Both are commercial programs, and relatively
  pricey. Both seem to work very similarly as well. But it's vastly
  different from the world of tracking. So, I checked out the scene to see
  what I could find.

     A lot of people use and enjoy Buzz. For whatever reason, it seems to
  crash a lot on my computer, especially whenever I try to use MIDI with
  it. There are a couple of machines (plugins of a sort) that you can
  download for Buzz that will allow you to sequence your MIDI. From people
  I know who use it with their MIDI devices, it works pretty well. But,
  it's not for me. I don't like Buzz very much.

     Currently, I'm toying around with a program called Z-Tracker. ZT is a
  pretty nice little program that very closely resembles Impulse Tracker.
  That's a bonus to me...as it's very comfortable for me to use. This will
  likely be my primary tracker for a while. The only drawback about this
  one? You cannot load audio samples. It's a MIDI-only program.

     Psycle, a program similar to Buzz, does not fully support MIDI yet at
  all. It allows you to utilize your MIDI device for input, but that's
  about it. Basically, you can hook up a MIDI keyboard to trigger notes.
  But the sound must be done utilizing different machines within Psycle.
  But rumor has it that they intend to implement some sort of MIDI output
  support in Psycle 2.x. As this is still a rumor...we'll see how it goes.
  I'm going to stay involved in this community, as I would love to have
  the best of all worlds: Sound samples, MIDI support and soft-synths for
  filtering and the like.

     As I said, I'm doing most of my music experimentation in Z-Tracker
  now. I'm slowly beginning to learn some things aboug MIDI, and the way
  it works. As with everything else...there are always advantages and
  disadvantages.  One of the biggest advantages of the synth world is the
  fact that you can dial up any number of samples without too much ease.
  I know that I'm used to spending hours downloading songs and sample sets
  to try to find the perfect piano, or violin, or what-not.  But in a
  matter of minutes, I can select from any number of violins already in my
  synth.  Later on down the road, my synth allows me to expand it by
  adding patch modules.  I might consider this, but for now, I have more
  samples than I could have use for.  Another big advantage of the MIDI
  world is the fact that you don't have to worry about sample dynamics.
  What I mean is that you need not worry about loading 5 piano samples
  just to get a full range of the piano.  This information is already
  built into your patches on your synth.  So, if you want a piano, you
  load the piano...that's it.

     But alas, I did say there were disadvantages. If you choose not to
  use a program like Z-Tracker, and you prefer to use some of the
  commercial software out there, it is to your benefit to learn how to
  play piano. I do not play it very well, and that might be one of the
  reasons I can't get used to such programs. You can use such programs as
  Sonar and Cubase without having such piano skills, but you will find it
  difficult to use. Another thing that drives me nuts is the way Channel
  10 on your MIDI devices work. Channel 10, under most configurations, is
  reserved for your percussion sets. While you can choose which percussion
  set you want to use...it is rather difficult to get used to all your
  percussion being utilized in one patch. The good news is that, if this
  bugs you, you can still load your percussion in other patch-parts. The
  bad news is that you can only load 16 parts in all. The biggest
  disadvantage to MIDI...you can't remain a purist. As you might have
  gathered from my introduction, MIDI files are not nearly as
  cross-platform compatible as one might think. The data will transfer
  flawlessly. But unless someone has the same synth you do, they likely
  won't hear what you heard. Even if you write in General MIDI (a
  universal standard for patch mapping), the sound quality will likely
  differ. Therefore, if you want to share your music with others -- you'll
  have to make a recording and release in MP3 format.

     My reaction when I first heard about having only 16 parts to map out
  for my music was "THAT's ALL?" Well, it really isn't as bad as you would
  think it would be. Take your average IT. Most of mine have anywhere
  between 8 and 24 samples. One of my tunes, which has 20 samples, can
  easily be narrowed down. It loads 5 piano samples, 3 violin samples, and
  3 clarinet samples. Considering I wouldn't have to load the excess
  samples to maintain sound quality across a range, I would literally only
  need to load 12 samples. But wait, 6 of them are percussion samples. In
  MIDI, they all get to pass through the same channel (Channel 10), and I
  have a full percussion set dependant on the note I play. So in
  actuality, I really only need 7 patches or channels. That still gives me
  plenty of room for more patches. And the reality is that the samples
  found with your synth are much fuller, and much more wholesome. So, you
  won't need to layer up the patches nearly as much as you would need to
  layer patches in tracking.

     Taking everything with a grain of salt, I am quite happy with the
  MIDI world thus far. As I continue on, I will grow with experience, and
  I will grow as a song writer. The XP-30 has given me a lot of
  inspiration, and it takes a lot of the boreing stuff out of tracking --
  like the sound sample searching. It's really a great medium to work in,
  and I'm not at all dissappointed in my purchase. The only catch: You'll
  find yourself playing with your synth the first few weeks. You won't
  write anything of any significance, but you will have a whole bunch of
  partial tunes. That's not a bad thing, it helps you learn. But you can't
  be focused on releasing something every week, at least until you get
  used to the medium.

                --Coplan



--=--=--
--=--=------=--=------=--=----
  In Tune
     Quasimojo's "Main Gauche"
  By:  Coplan
----=--=------=--=------=--=--

  -=- Corrections: -=-
     Last issue, I did my 2001 favorites list, as I do every year.  On that
  list was a tune "Warlock" by Caravan.  To refresh your memory, this was
  a tune that was used for a demo, "Cadence & Cascade" by Andromeda
  Software Development (ASD).  Unfortunately, the tune is not an original
  tune.  It is in fact a tune from the late '60s or early '70s.  The tune
  was credited the way it should've been, and it was never said that it
  was an original tune for the demo.  My appologies over the confusion.
  Regardless, it is a really good tune, and it was a good utilization of
  such.  Again, sorry about the confusion.

  -=- Introduction -=-
     I've been considering getting myself a synth for many years now.
  Lately, I was finally able to afford one, but I still wasn't 100% sold
  on the idea...even with my buddy Setec bugging me every other day.
  Sure, I could sample off the thing...but I wanted to toy with it as
  well.  So it wouldn't be worth it to me unless I could do some MIDI
  stuff with it as well.  But keep in mind, this is a boy who used to
  listen to MIDI files on his old fm synth SB16 before getting into
  tracking.  And I got into tracking because the potential for sound
  quality was far better than what I heard from cheezy MIDI files.

     So it was recommended that I check out ZTracker.  I jumped on the
  ZTracker site (http://ztracker.sourceforge.net) and grabbed some of the
  tunes listed there.  Quasimojo's tune, "Main Gauche", was listed among
  the tunes created on ZTracker.  So I grabbed it, and I was impressed.

     Needless to say, I ordered my synth.  (Check out my adventures in
  "Journey into MIDI", a feature mini-column starting this issue).


  -=- "Main Gauche" by Quasimojo -=-
  Two things impress me most about this song:

     1) The song was created utilizing ZTracker, which is a MIDI-only
        tracking program.  One cannot load samples into a song.  I suppose
        Quasimojo could've done a lot of post-processing, or tracked out
        a drum track for this, or any combination of things.  But that
        doesn't make me loose respect for the song at all.  The base was
        started in ZTracker, and somehow was turned into the final product
        we have today.  The methodology isn't all that different from how
        most trackers write their music.

     2) "Main Gauche" is mellow, but it's damn fun to listen to.  This is
        one of those songs that, if played at a high school dance, the
        people on the floor wouldn't know whether to slow dance or fast
        dance.  There's a lot of energy in the song, but you can also
        chill to it.  It's one of those songs that you can either crank
        the volume, or turn it down.  The dynamics of the song are
        incredible and versatile in that aspect.

     The song opens with a very faded nylon guitar riff and some static, as
  if we were listening to some old record.  It repeats a bit, and you can
  almost hear the record skipping.  I picture a talented DJ laying down
  his tunes and his rhythms with his turn-tables.  Then he layers on top
  of that some of the most interesting percussion and base guitar riffs
  you've ever heard in a song like this.

     Let me dwell on the percussion for a little bit.  This style of music
  (Quasimojo calls it "Love 'n Light") allows for a large amount of
  artistic license.  Unless there were two or three drummers involved
  with this song, the percussion is likely not exactly humanly possible.
  But again, artistic license is something I'll allow in styles such as
  this.  He uses the high-hat as if it were being played with two hands:
  one with the stick, the other ready to stop it from vibrating.  The
  effect is pretty cool.  Something else I'd like to point out about the
  percussion:  The base drum.  It seems like such a subtle thing, but base
  drum rolls are not exactly easy to do on a drum set, even with dual
  pedals.  In a song like this, it adds an incredible depth to the song.
  And yet, most people won't even notice it.  Again, one of the unique
  things about electronic styles is the fact that there are no limits.

     Now I raved earlier about the dynamics of this song.  Grab this song,
  and do three things with it.  First, listen to it at a normal volume.
  You'll get the idea for how the song works, and you'll appreciate the
  next two steps more.  Second, pump up the volume (and if you can, make
  sure you get some base response in there).  That base guitar and the
  percussion will take control of your mind, and you'll feel like you're a
  part of the song.  Finally, turn that volume down.  Even if you still
  have a lot of base present, you'll find that it fits pretty well into
  the background.  It doesn't interrupt your thoughts, and it certainly
  doesn't get in the way.  I don't know how he does it, but this is
  something that few songs can do.  There is one thing for sure: Quasimojo
  did his homework when it came to the final mixing tweaks.  The song is
  mixed really well, and the sound quality is incredible.

     Again, I have to throw in the fact that this was created with a MIDI
  synthesizer.  I wouldn't have believed it until I got my own, and
  realized what I was missing all these years.  From a creation point of
  view, I am in awe when it comes to this song.  From a music appreciation
  point of view, well, I'm still in awe about this song.  It's a great
  tune, and I highly recommend this tune for almost anyone.

  Song Information:
     Title:  Main Gauche
     Author:  Quasimojo
     Release date:  July 17, 2001
     Length:  6:06
     File Size:  4.8 MB
     Source:  http://www.chillproductions.com

                --Coplan

     "In Tune" is a regular column dedicated to the review of original and
  singular works by fellow trackers.  It is to be used as a tool to expand
  your listening and writing horizons, but should not be used as a general
  rating system.  Coplan's opinions are not the opinions of the Static
  Line Staff.

     If you have heard a song you would like to recommend (either your own,
  or another person's), We can be contacted through e-mail useing the
  addresses found in the closing notes.  Please do not send files attached
  to e-mail without first contacting us.  Thank you!


--=--=--
--=--=------=--=------=--=----
  Screen Lit Vertigo
     "Medium" by einklang.net (party-version)
  By:  Seven
----=--=------=--=------=--=--

  Found at www.scene.org
  3th place at the Party 2k1.

  System requirements:
     11 MB HD, Windows, and I guess a 3D card with T&L is a must.

  Test Machine: PIII 900 640MB, SB1024, GeForce 2MX 32MB, Win98

  The Credits:
     Pet: Code, design
     Tjurn: BW ping pong
     Photonic Labor: Makina gfx
     (don't ask, that's what's in the credits)

  The Demo:
     Well, well. It's been a long time since I've seen one of these. A
  techno-demo! And it's a pretty good one, which is an even more rare
  occurence :) I'm not a fan of techno music, too monotonous for my taste.
  The track of Medium is no exception, it starts with a "continue" voice
  sample that is repeated over and over, and which is slowly joined by
  more and more layers of percussion. There's a break halfway, in the
  water-part of the demo, but after that it goes back to monotonous beats.

     However, the code in this one is really good, IMHO. It starts with a
  kind of tunnel, made of and filled with red transparent shrouds. It
  looks very different from the usual run-of-the-mill tunnel effects.
  Later a square pillar formed by thousands of orthogonal lines in
  electric blue appears in the tunnel, the looks remind me a bit of Super
  luxus lemmen paketti/MFX. The next part shows 2 morphing blobs, one
  jellyfish and the other corkscrew-like, moving very smooth and with very
  nice chrome-like reflections, not plasticy as happens too often. There's
  a slower underwater part, during which the credits are shown too. The
  last part features a kind of distorted 3D, it looks like the models have
  been pulled through a bread-slicer, then rendered twice on top of each
  other: once solid, and once sliced. It looks much cooler than it sounds,
  believe me :)

     Besides a little bear logo at the start, there are no real graphics,
  just white flashing overlays of cogs. The syncing to the music is very
  good, as is to be expected in this type of demo. Every color change,
  flash or camera switch is synced to the beat.

  Overall:
     There are a few things I don't like about Medium, but they're all
  inherent to the fact it's a techno-demo, so it wouldn't be fair to call
  them bad points. Just like the music, the effects are very monotonous;
  going on for several minutes before changing, and the flashing gets on
  my nerves near the end. I'd also appreciate it if a demo just quits when
  the music is over, now it leaves me wondering wether my PC is so slow
  that the graphics have to catch up with the sound. But the demo is
  definately good in it's genre, with its flashy color scheme and the
  matching speed of the music and the visuals. So, if you're a fan of
  techno, this one is certainly recommended.

                --Seven


--=--=--
--=--=------=--=------=--=----
  Editorial
     Where to go now!
  By: Coplan
----=--=------=--=------=--=--

  -=- Introduction -=-
     Last issue, the January issue, I put forth a challenge. When I
  started releasing Static Line, my goal was, and still is, to get more
  people involved within the scene. This may or may not be apparent all
  whenever you read my words. One of the things that makes the scene so
  glorious is the fact that there are so many people doing this as a
  hobby. No one makes money from the scene. No one even breaks even.
  People contribute to the scene because it's something they like to do.
  Without human involvement, your involvement, the scene really does not
  exist.

     To be fair, I have already made a challenge to you, my readers. I
  have already put forth a great deal of my conscience in hope that you
  will want to become more involved. This month, I will point out a few
  projects that might benefit from your contribution. Some of these might
  sound like shameless plugs, and I'll admit that. But we could always use
  some help as well.


  -=- Writers -=-
     Granted, you could easily write for Static Line. You know where to
  get ahold of me, and you know where you can contribute. Maybe you'll
  have interest in interviewing people at random. Maybe you'll want to
  write technical articles about the finer points of coding demos. Or
  technique articles about how to track good tunes in some of the more
  current tracking programs. We're always looking for writers, and we're
  always willing to consider any article that is sent our way. Be it for a
  column, be it for a feature article, we'll at least check it out.

     Aside from that, there are plenty of quality magazines out there that
  could benefit from some good writers. One of the more famous magazines
  is Hugi (http://www.hugi.de). Hugi is a diskmag with a whole coded
  interface that comes out every few months, which might be an easier
  schedule to keep than a weekly or monthly magazine. While the magazine
  might seem to be packed full of articles all the time, I'm sure Claus
  (Adok) wouldn't mind getting some extra articles. For that matter, you
  could always start checking out any one of the magazines listed in our
  links list, and maybe contact the editor about writing for them. And
  don't feel you have to limit yourself to one magazine. Seven writes both
  for Static Line and Hugi, for example. Sometimes, he even utilizes the
  same articles.

     No one says that you have to write articles either. Supposing you
  like technical writing, and documentation. There are plenty of
  open-source projects within the scene that could more than benefit from
  some documentation. Cmicali (cmicali@users.sf.net), creator of ZTracker
  (http://ztracker.sourceforge.net), could definately benefit from some
  documentation of the project. By contributing to this project, you could
  definately free up some time for Cmicali to continue coding his IT based
  MIDI tracking program. There's also the Psycle soft-synth tracking
  program (http://psycle.pastnotecut.org/), which has also requested
  additional help for software documentation. Both of these programs are
  starting to become more popular, and again, your contribution could
  definately help these projects develop. For that matter, either project
  (or any other project, for that matter) could definately use testers.
  Use the program. If you find a bug, you've made a contribution. That's
  easy enough.


  -=- Coders -=-
     I've already mentioned two large projects: ZTracker and Psycle. What
  you might not know is that they both wouldn't mind some help as far as
  the code is concerned. If you like coding, you might enjoy contributing
  here.

     Psycle is a software synth tracking program. In addition to the code
  base for the main program (C++, Win32), Psycle could most benefit from
  some additional machines (generators and/or effects). If you're
  interested in contributing some code to this project, you will want to
  visit the SourceForge project site
  (http://www.sourceforge.net/projects/psycle) or or contact [JAZ]
  (jaz_e@terra.es).

     ZTracker is also an open source project. It too is coded for Win32 in
  C++. To get involved with this project, you will want to visit either
  the sourceforge site (http://sourceforge.net/projects/ztracker/) or
  contact cmicali (again, at cmicali@users.sf.net).

     If C++ isn't your thing, you can always help to maintain a site. I'm
  sure you could contribute again to any one of the projects above. But
  you could use standard HTML to help out another young project in the
  works: h8 tracker (http://www.h8.prv.pl/). He might be angry that I say
  this, but CTT (cct2@go2.pl) would definately benefit from a new site.
  Sure, he might be talented with HTML, but why let him do that when he
  could be coding the next popular tracking program?

     Again, I'll have to mount a shameless plug as well. SceneSpot is
  under redevelopment right now. If you know Perl and mySQL (the mySQL
  part is easy to learn), you can definately contribute to our cause as
  well. Currently, the development team consists of just one person:
  myself. I could always use some company, and we're set up on a CVS, so
  if you have Linux, you can always contribute to SceneSpot.


  -=- Other Contributions -=-
     There are hundreds of other ways to contribute to the scene:

     Your favorite Demo or Tracking Competition might need some judges to
  help determine who rocks, and who sucks. If you think this isn't much of
  a contribution, think about what the competitors learn from your
  decisions, your thoughts and your comments.

     There might be a Demo Party that might be happening in your
  neighborhood in the next couple of months. I garuntee that the
  organizers could benefit from your help. There's always lots of running
  around to do, and lots of things to prepare. For that matter, there are
  probably things that you could do for them even if you're not in the
  same part of the world. Maybe you work for a company that might be
  willing to sponsor such an event. Just imagine what a donation of a
  couple of sound cards or a couple of video cards might do to the prize
  pool! If you have those resources...use them. The orgos will love you
  for it.

     But lets not forget about the queen mother of all contributions:
  Spread the Word. Talk up the scene. Make some CDs of your tunes, and
  other tunes, and share them with your friends. Talk to other sceners,
  make them feel welcomed. Offer advice about their demos, their music and
  their art. Have an opinion about things, and make sure you're not too
  harsh or sharp tounged when you speak about your opinions. The goal is
  to get people interested, keep people interested, get them to
  contribute, and not frustrate them. A frustrated scener is the scener
  who leaves next month. That scener, with guidence, could've been the
  next Necros, or the next Vic. Wouldn't you feel good if you knew that
  you were the guy that helped them get there? And wouldn't you feel
  really incredible when he writes an article for "The Root" and states
  that his start all began with you?

     Yes, it's an Ego thing. You contribute to the scene to get
  recognized. You contribute to the scene because you feel as though you
  belong. So get recognized, and get known for your contributions. It's
  fun, and you'll gain lots of friends around the world.

                --Coplan


--=--=--
--=--=------=--=------=--=----
  Link List
----=--=------=--=------=--=--

  Portals:

      Orange Juice.............................http://www.ojuice.net
      Scene.org.................................http://www.scene.org
      SceneSpot.............................http://www.scenespot.org
      CFXweb.......................................http://cfxweb.net
      Pouet.net.................................http://www.pouet.net
      Demoscene.org.........................http://www.demoscene.org
      Scenet....................................http://www.scenet.de
      Demo.org...................................http://www.demo.org
      Czech Scene................................http://www.scene.cz
      Danish Scene..............................http://demo-scene.dk
      Hungarian Scene........................http://www.scene-hu.com
      Italian Scene...........................http://run.to/la_scena
      ModPlug Central Resources..........http://www.castlex.com/mods
  <U> Norwegian Scene........................http://www.demoscene.no
      Planet Zeus..........................http://www.planetzeus.net
      Polish Scene...........................http://www.demoscena.pl
      Russian Scene..........................http://www.demoscene.ru
      Spanish Scene............................http://www.escena.org
      Swiss Scene..............................http://www.chscene.ch

  Archives:

      Acid2.....................................ftp://acid2.stack.nl
      Amber.......................................ftp://amber.bti.pl
      Cyberbox.....................................ftp://cyberbox.de
      Hornet (1992-1996)........................ftp://ftp.hornet.org
      Scene.org..................................ftp://ftp.scene.org
      Scene.org Austra........................ftp://ftp.au.scene.org
      Scene.org Netherlands...................ftp://ftp.nl.scene.org
      Swiss Scene FTP...........................ftp://ftp.chscene.ch

  Demo Groups:

      3g Design..............................http://3gdesign.cjb.net
      3State...................................http://threestate.com
      7 Gods.........................................http://7gods.sk
      Aardbei.....................................http://aardbei.com
      Acid Rain..............................http://surf.to/acidrain
      Addict..................................http://addict.scene.pl
      Agravedict........................http://www.agravedict.art.pl
      Alien Prophets.....................http://www.alienprophets.dk
      Anakata..............................http://www.anakata.art.pl
      Astral..............................http://astral.scene-hu.com
      Astroidea........................http://astroidea.scene-hu.com
      BlaBla..............................http://blabla.planet-d.net
      Blasphemy..............................http://www.blasphemy.dk
      Bomb..................................http://bomb.planet-d.net
      Broncs..................................http://broncs.scene.cz
      Byterapers.....................http://www.byterapers.scene.org
      Bypass.................................http://bypass.scene.org
      Calodox.................................http://www.calodox.org
      Cocoon..............................http://cocoon.planet-d.net
      Confine.................................http://www.confine.org
      Damage...................................http://come.to/damage
  <U> Dc5.........................................http://www.dc5.org
      Delirium..............................http://delirium.scene.pl
      Eclipse............................http://www.eclipse-game.com
      Elitegroup..........................http://elitegroup.demo.org
      Exceed...........................http://www.inf.bme.hu/~exceed
      Fairlight.............................http://www.fairlight.com
      Fobia Design...........................http://www.fd.scene.org
      Freestyle............................http://www.freestylas.org
      Fresh! Mindworks...................http://kac.poliod.hu/~fresh
      Future Crew..........................http://www.futurecrew.org
      Fuzzion.................................http://www.fuzzion.org
      GODS...................................http://www.idf.net/gods
      Halcyon...........................http://www.halcyon.scene.org
      Haujobb..................................http://www.haujobb.de
      Hellcore............................http://www.hellcore.art.pl
      Infuse...................................http://www.infuse.org
      Kilobite...............................http://kilobite.cjb.net
      Kolor................................http://www.kaoz.org/kolor
      Komplex.................................http://www.komplex.org
      Kooma.....................................http://www.kooma.com
      Mandula.........................http://www.inf.bme.hu/~mandula
      Maturefurk...........................http://www.maturefurk.com
      Monar................ftp://amber.bti.pl/pub/scene/distro/monar
      MOVSD....................................http://movsd.scene.cz
      Nextempire...........................http://www.nextempire.com
      Noice.....................................http://www.noice.org
      Orange.................................http://orange.scene.org
      Orion................................http://orion.planet-d.net
      Outbreak................................http://www.outbreak.nu
      Popsy Team............................http://popsyteam.rtel.fr
      Prone................................http://www.prone.ninja.dk
      Purple....................................http://www.purple.dk
      Rage........................................http://www.rage.nu
      Replay.......................http://www.shine.scene.org/replay
      Retro A.C...........................http://www.retroac.cjb.net
      Sista Vip..........................http://www.sistavip.exit.de
      Skytech team............................http://www.skytech.org
      Spinning Kids......................http://www.spinningkids.org
      Sunflower.......................http://sunflower.opengl.org.pl
      Talent.............................http://talent.eurochart.org
      The Black Lotus.............................http://www.tbl.org
      The Digital Artists Wired Nation.http://digitalartists.cjb.net
      The Lost Souls...............................http://www.tls.no
      TPOLM.....................................http://www.tpolm.com
      Trauma.................................http://sauna.net/trauma
      T-Rex.....................................http://www.t-rex.org
      Unik........................................http://www.unik.de
      Universe..........................http://universe.planet-d.net
      Vantage..................................http://www.vantage.ch
      Wipe....................................http://www.wipe-fr.org

  Music Labels, Music Sites:

      Aisth.....................................http://www.aisth.com
      Aural Planet........................http://www.auralplanet.com
      Azure...................................http://azure-music.com
      Blacktron Music Production...........http://www.d-zign.com/bmp
      BrothomStates.............http://www.katastro.fi/brothomstates
      Chill..........................http://www.chillproductions.com
      Chippendales......................http://www.sunpoint.net/~cnd
      Chiptune...............................http://www.chiptune.com
      Da Jormas................................http://www.jormas.com
      Fabtrax......http://www.cyberverse.com/~boris/fabtrax/home.htm
      Fairlight Music.....................http://fairlight.scene.org
      Five Musicians.........................http://www.fm.scene.org
      Fusion Music Crew.................http://members.home.nl/cyrex
      Goodstuff..........................http://artloop.de/goodstuff
      Hellven.................................http://www.hellven.org
      Ignorance.............................http://www.ignorance.org
      Immortal Coil.............................http://www.ic.l7.net
      Intense...........................http://intense.ignorance.org
      Jecoute.................................http://jecoute.cjb.net
      Kosmic Free Music Foundation.............http://www.kosmic.org
      Lackluster.....................http://www.m3rck.net/lackluster
      Level-D.................................http://www.level-d.com
      Miasmah.............................http://www.miasmah.cjb.net
      Milk.......................................http://milk.sgic.fi Mah
      Music.............................http://come.to/mah.music Maniacs
      of noise...............http://home.worldonline.nl/~mon MAZ's sound
      homepage..................http://www.maz-sound.com
      Med.......................................http://www.med.fr.fm
      Mo'playaz..........................http://ssmedion.de/moplayaz
      Mono211.................................http://www.mono211.com
      Morbid Minds..............http://www.raveordie.com/morbidminds
      Noise................................http://www.noisemusic.org
      Noerror.......................http://www.error-404.com/noerror One
      Touch Records......................http://otr.planet-d.net
      Park..................................http://park.planet-d.net
      pHluid..................................http://phluid.acid.org
      Radical Rhythms.....http://www.andrew.cmu.edu/user/merrelli/rr RBi
      Music.............................http://www.rbi-music.com Ruff
      Engine................http://members.xoom.com/ruff_engine
      SHR8M......................................http://1st.to/shr8m Sound
      Devotion................http://sugarbomb.x2o.net/soundev
      Soundstate.........................http://listen.to/soundstate
      Sunlikamelo-D...........http://www.error-404.com/sunlikamelo-d
      Suspect Records........................http://www.tande.com/sr
      Tequila........................http://www.defacto2.net/tequila
      Tempo................................http://tempomusic.cjb.net
      Tetris....................................http://msg.sk/tetris
      Theralite...........................http://theralite.avalon.hr Tokyo
      Dawn Records........................http://tokyodawn.org Triad's C64
      music archive.............http://www.triad.c64.org
      UltraBeat.........................http://www.innerverse.com/ub
      Vibrants................................http://www.vibrants.dk
      Wiremaniacs.........................http://www.wiremaniacs.com Zen
      of Tracking.........................http://surf.to/the-imm

  Programming:

      Programming portal......................http://www.gamedev.net
      Programming portal.....................http://www.flipcode.com
      Game programming portal...............http://www.gamasutra.com
      3D programming portal.................http://www.3dgamedev.com
      Programming portal......................http://www.exaflop.org
      Programming portal............http://www.programmersheaven.com
      Programming portal.....................http://www.freecode.com
      NASM (free Assembly compiler)......http://www.cryogen.com/nasm
      LCC (free C compiler).........http://www.remcomp.com/lcc-win32
      PTC video engine.........................http://www.gaffer.org
      3D engines..........http://cg.cs.tu-berlin.de/~ki/engines.html
      Documents...............http://www.neutralzone.org/home/faqsys
      File format collection...................http://www.wotsit.org

  Magazines:

      Amber...............................http://amber.bti.pl/di_mag
      Amnesia...............http://amnesia-dist.future.easyspace.com
      Demojournal....................http://demojournal.planet-d.net
      Eurochart.............................http://www.eurochart.org
      Heroin...................................http://www.heroin.net
      Hugi........................................http://www.hugi.de
      Music Massage......................http://www.scene.cz/massage
      Pain..................................http://pain.planet-d.net
      Scenial...........................http://www.scenial.scene.org
      Shine...............................http://www.shine.scene.org
      Static Line................http://www.scenespot.org/staticline
      Sunray..............................http://sunray.planet-d.net
      TUHB.......................................http://www.tuhb.org
      WildMag..................................http://www.wildmag.de

  Parties:

      Assembly (Finland).....................http://www.assembly.org
      Ambience (The Netherlands)..............http://www.ambience.nl
      Dreamhack (Sweden)....................http://www.dreamhack.org
      Buenzli (Switzerland)......................http://www.buenz.li
      Gravity (Poland)............http://www.demoscena.cp.pl/gravity
      Mekka-Symposium (Germany)...................http://ms.demo.org
      Takeover (The Netherlands).............,http://www.takeover.nl
      The Party (Denmark).....................http://www.theparty.dk

  Others:

      Demo secret parts....http://www.inf.bme.hu/~mandula/secret.txt
      Textmode Demo Archive.................http://tmda.planet-d.net
      Arf!Studios..........................http://www.arfstudios.org
      #coders..................................http://coderz.cjb.net
      Demonews Express.........http://www.teeselink.demon.nl/express
      Demo fanclub........................http://jerware.org/fanclub
      Digital Undergrounds.....................http://dug.iscool.net
      Doose charts...............................http://www.doose.dk
      Freax................................http://freax.scene-hu.com
      GfxZone............................http://gfxzone.planet-d.net
      PC-demos explained.....http://www.oldskool.org/demos/explained
      Pixel...................................http://pixel.scene.org
      #trax e-mail list.............................................
         .............http://www.scenespot.org/mailman/listinfo/trax
      Underground Mine.............http://www.spinningkids.org/umine

  IRC Channels:

      Scene.........................................ircnet #thescene
      Programming.....................................ircnet #coders
      Programming....................................efnet #flipcode
      Graphics.........................................ircnet #pixel
      Music.............................................ircnet #trax
      Scene (French)..................................ircnet #demofr
      Programming (French)............................ircnet #codefr
      Graphics (French)..............................ircnet #pixelfr
      Scene (Hungarian)............................ircnet #demoscene
      Programming (Hungarian)......................ircnet #coders.hu
      Programming (German)........................ircnet #coders.ger


--=--=--
----=--=------=--=------=--=------=--=------=--=------=--=------=--=------
  Editor:          Coplan / D. Travis North / coplan@scenespot.org
  Writers:         Coplan / D. Travis North / coplan@scenespot.org
                    Dilvish / Eric Hamilton / dilvie@yahoo.com
                    Psitron / Tim Soderstrom / tigerhawk@stic.net
                    Setec / Jesper Pederson / jesped@post.tele.dk
                    Seven / Stefaan VanNieuwenhuyze/ seven7@writeme.com
                    Tryhuk / Tryhuk Vojtech / vojtech.tryhuk@worldonline.cz
  Technical Consult: Ranger Rick / Ben Reed / ranger@scenespot.org

  Static Line on the Web:  http://www.scenespot.org/staticline

  Static Line Subscription Management:
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