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_//\\________________________________________________________________________
_\\__T_A_T_I_C___L_I_N_E______________________________________ January, 2002
__\\_________________________________________________________________________
\\//__ Monthly Scene E-Zine ________________________________ 254 Subscribers
_____________________________________________________________________________


--=--=--
--=--=------=--=------=--=----
  Table Of Contents
----=--=------=--=------=--=--
     Opening:
           Message From the Editor
           Letters From Our Readers
     Features:
        The Root -- Gene Wie (Psibelius)
     Columns:
        Music:
           In Tune -- Music of the year 2001
           The Listener -- A Hypothetical Multi-Artist CD from 2001
        Demo:
           Screen Lit Vertigo -- Several Demos from 2001
        General:
           Editorial -- A Challenge for 2002
           Link List -- Get Somewhere in the Scene
        Closing:
           Credits

--=--=--
--=--=------=--=------=--=----
  Message From the Editor
----=--=------=--=------=--=--
     2001 has been an interesting year for many of us. As far as the Scene
  is concerned, I'm convinced that the year 2001 is just the beginning of
  the rebirth of the scene. Late in the year, I saw much more activity
  than at the beginning of the year, or even in the year 2000. We have
  seen a lot of new groups, a lot of new talent, and a lot of new
  services. The Demoscene is once again gaining in popularity, both within
  the scene itself, and from observers. For the first time in many years,
  a major magazine, Wired Magazine, has mentioned the existance of the
  scene. But Wired didn't stop there, they covered a major scene party,
  Assembly '01, in four complete articles. For more information, visit
  scenespot:

     http://www.scenespot.org/?command=showNews&article=101

     Well, the rebirth starts here with Static Line.  Albeit, I guess
  we're not the major scene authority, and we don't claim to be.  But I
  imagine that we have just enough to demonstrate how much the year 2001
  has begun to impact the demoscene as we know it.  I'm sure that by the
  end of 2002, or the beginning of 2003, we will all look back on 2001
  and realize its impact.  So without further ado, I will bring to you
  the latest issue of Static Line, a review of 2001.

                --Coplan


--=--=--
--=--=------=--=------=--=----
  The Root
     Scene Change
  Sponsored by: Coplan
  By: Gene Wie (aka: Psibelius)
----=--=------=--=------=--=--

  -=- Introduction - By: Coplan -=-

     As you all know, we occasionally like to invite oldskool sceners to
  write a brief recap of what their involvements in the scene.  This was a
  concept started by Tryhuk a long time ago, and it has opened our eyes,
  and our readers' eyes, to the big picture of the scene.  We have learned
  much about what the scene was, and how it has become what it is today.

     This month, I'm very proud to say that we have a special writer:
  Gene Wie (aka: Psibelius).  If the name doesn't sound familiar, then
  you havn't been involved in the scene for very long.  A long time ago,
  before the advent of Static Line, before I became a writer within the
  scene, there was a magazine called TraxWeekly.  It was not started by
  Gene, but he eventually became the editor of the popular tracking
  e-zine.  That is where I got my start, as In Tune first existed within
  Trax Weekly.  Therefore, Gene has been a very special influence for my
  involvement in the scene.

     So without further comment, I present to you:  Gene Wie.


  -=- The Root -=-

     I really didn't expect to be writing an e-zine article ever again.
  Especially not one related to or discussing the much heralded (and now
  rather amorphous) electronic music scene.

     Leave it to Coplan to find me after a few years of inactivity and ask
  me to write something.  In any case, I've been asked to talk about my
  origins in the scene, contributions to it, and my personal observations
  on its past, present, and future.  Seems to me like a lot to choke down,
  so let's get started.

     Most people will remember me for one of two things.  The first, is
  "TraxWeekly," that ever present near-weekly newsletter for the music
  scene, spawned in the wake of a pause in publication of the much larger
  (and to my own recollection, much more well organized) DemoNews, of the
  now-defunct Hornet Archive.  The other is that gargantuan horde of
  musicians known as "Epinicion Productions" a music group which ended
  it's two years of existence with over one hundred thirty members, who
  produced over two hundred fifty unique compositions.

     Let's start at the beginning.

     I got my start in "the scene" in ANSI art.  Around 1992, a friend of
  mine (Jordan Snodgrass, aka Flood Myth, now electronic musician "the
  snodgrass" with the imputor.com label) pulled together some 2400 modems,
  got into BBS'ing, and ran smack dab into the art crowd.  Without the
  internet, we didn't see much of mod music in our area code (619) and
  spent most of our first year online immersed in petty squabbles with
  other local "artistes."

     As I started dialing long distance (oh yes, "LD," baby), I started
  noticing lots and lots of "mods" to download. Being a proud Media Vision
  PAS16 owner, I had the chance to listen to a couple of them with
  Trakblaster Pro. Being a musician in "real life," I got hooked on mods
  completely.  First were pieces by Dr. Awesome and Captain.  1993 and
  1994 was the era of Future Crew, Purple Motion, Skaven, Dizzy, Mr. Man,
  Cybelius, and a slew of others.  Their music, and their ability to
  generate the sounds they did without expensive equipment (and my own
  ability to play this music without having to travel halfway around to
  world) inspired me in a way nothing else did to date.

     In 1993 I learned to track using Renaissance MultiTracker, by
  Starscream.  In the years ahead as people moved on to ScreamTracker3 and
  FastTracker2, I stuck with the MTM format.  Come to think of it, around
  1995, in discussion on #trax, Maelcum (of Kosmic fame) and I came to the
  conclusion that we were probably two of the last few trackers on the
  entire planet even using MultiTracker.  I tested out Impulse Tracker in
  it's early stages when Jeff Lim was coding like mad, and switched over
  when IT came into it's own as a superb tracking software.  Bless Jeff,
  he even wrote support in IT for converting MTM files. That was the
  single feature (besides the excellent editing functions, NNAs, etc.)
  that tided me over.

     From 1994 to 1996 I ran "Epinicion Productions."  From the get go,
  Epinicion was always really just "new and starting musicians" and a few
  experienced sceners who tagged along for the ride.  I think I'd be
  opening up a can of warms if I went on about stuff the group did and the
  politics that involved it and other groups at the time, but I just want
  to say that I had a great time running it, met lots of cool people
  interested in music, and came away from it with a much better
  understanding of how to deal with people when you don't get the chance
  to talk to all of them face to face. There's a lot of people from
  Epinicion whom I've never been able to associate anything but a handle,
  a couple songs, and an email or two.  That's enough though; their
  dedication to the group and efforts continue composing in spite of the
  criticism they recieved showed me plenty about their spirit.

     Now here's two rather amusing asides: I sent perhaps one of the
  ugliest, and worst tracked songs I've ever written to Basehead by DCC on
  IRC #trax during my early days on there. I'm quite sure that Baze
  listened to the first 10 seconds, turned it off, and probably said
  something along the lines of, "this guy friggin' sucks."  Then there was
  this wonderful time where a bunch of people had to convince me that
  Daredevil was indeed the founder of Renaissance.  Ahh, the days of
  blissful ignorance...and I can't forget my other partner in crime, Jesse
  Rothenberg (aka Island of Reil or "ior" as he is better known), one of
  my best friends in high school and scene compatriot.  Wonder what he's
  up to these days...

     I needed a group to settle down in, and ended up with my friend Ryan
  Hunt (aka Pinion) in pHluid, the music division of ACiD Productions.  I
  joined the reformed division in 1995, and that was sort of my "scene
  dream realized."  All of us *idolized* the graphicians of ACiD (and also
  iCE) when we first got into the whole business of BBS'ing, ANSI art, and
  whatnot, and to be a small part of the group was what I equated with
  finally "making it."  Regardless of the validity of that assessment, to
  this day I am still a member of the group, though my last tracked
  release was over a year ago. It's the one small part of the scene I hold
  on to, and it's for the people in it who supported me in my own efforts
  at tracking.

     Also, from 1996-1998 I edited "TraxWeekly," the weekly music scene
  newsletter.  I was coached in the intricacies of e-zine and listserver
  management by Christopher Mann, aka Snowman, of Hornet.  TraxWeekly was
  founded and edited by Populus, who handed the editorship to Popcorn a
  few months after.

     Following a rather vicious coup (involving a large number of
  individuals and events which I still refuse to discuss) I took control
  of the newsletter around issue thirty or so, and continued working on it
  until issue one-hundered-nineteen. Events in my personal life prevented
  from ever continuing work on TW after that.  Issue one-hundred-twenty
  sits incomplete on my old Pentium 166 machine (in my closet somewhere)
  even as I write this.  One of these days I'll put it together in it's
  final form and send it here to Static Line for perusal.

     I went at tracking solo for a short time last year, without any real
  involvement the scene.  My work can be found at:
  http://www.gts2k.com/~psibelius/

     I don't really have any huge, all encompassing commentary about the
  scene as it is today.  Having not participated for some years now, I
  don't know what's happening.  I'm glad to see that #trax is still active
  though, and ran into lots of old friends for hours and hours after the
  events of September 11, 2001.  I read the bulletin boards on United
  Trackers from time to time to see what people are up to.  From what I
  see, it seems to me that the scene is much larger, a bit more
  impersonal, and densely populated compared to the early 90's. I don't
  think we didn't expect this to happen though; we pushed so hard to get
  the "underground electronic music scene" out into the open it was bound
  to get over-commercialized at some point.

     Still, tracking to me is that "in-between" world where music and
  technology collides, and the people who choose it as their artistic
  medium come up with audio works that are completely unique and different
  from the pure "modern music" composers and traditional
  instrumental/vocal mindsets.

     My own personal life has largely paralleled my (diminishing)
  articipation in the scene.  I finished a five year run as an
  ndergraduate studying information and computer science last year.  I
  turned down all my job offers in order to go back to school and pursue a
  master's degree in conducting and instrumental performance. In my spare
  time I compose constantly for my string quartet (and let me plug
  Sibelius 2 for a moment: it's excellent!), and I plan to move into
  larger works for orchestra and wind ensemble.  At some point I hope to
  teach and conduct high school and college instrumental ensembles.

     It's been ten years since I first fired up that modem, and I think all
  that time I spent in front of a screen for the scene has given me a life
  experience a lot of people miss: meeting and understanding people who
  come from many diverse cultures with many disparate customs.

     Okay, let me leave you all with a gift.  Fire up your web browser and
  grab this file:

     http://www.gts2k.com/~psibelius/TW-complete.zip

     It's every single issue of TraxWeekly, from 1-119, including a
  different issue 25 (when the big coup over the editorship occured), and
  finally, a series of "art" files from various ascii artists who
  graciously spent their time designing the headers for various sections
  in the newsletter.  Thanks to all of you for making TW a reality!

     Thanks for the soapbox, Coplan.  The memories have been fun.

                --Gene Wie (aka: Psibelius)
                  former editor of TraxWeekly
                  former director of Epinicion Productions
                  member of pHluid Music Productions
                  tenant of IRC #trax
                  then, now, and always, a proud member of the scene

  -=- Editors Note -=-

  TraxWeekly is now available in its entirety on the SceneSpot FTP:

     ftp://ftp.scenespot.org/Archives/magazines/trax_weekly/


--=--=--
--=--=------=--=------=--=----
  In Tune
     Music of the year 2001
  By:  Coplan
----=--=------=--=------=--=--

  -=- Introduction -=-
  Every January, I like to do a quick review of all my favorite tunes of
  the previous year.  I don't like to rank such tunes, as I have a very
  broad taste in music.  Many of these tunes truly can't be compared to
  each other.  In addition, I realize the fact that I have only found a
  very small fraction of all the music that was released in the year 2001,
  and I'm sure there are some better tunes (and some worse) that I have
  missed.

  Again, I suggest that this list be used to find some music you may not
  have heard.  It might be a good way to find new music from artists you've
  never heard of.  Use this as a guide.  I'm sorry to say that I have no
  idea where I got most of these tunes...so you'll have to do a search to
  find a lot of them.  As I don't have these in original form (Zip files,
  complete with NFO files and what not), I will not post them publically
  on our server.  However, if there is any tune you're having trouble
  finding, I will offer it to you in any way I can get it to you.

  -=- 2001 Tunes -=-

  "Be What you Wanna Be"
     By: T-Tracker
     (XM Format)

     A trance-like tune from the mind of T-Tracker.  When I listen to this
     tune, I can't help but to think that I'm involved in some sort of
     racing game on my computer.  But as that is not the case, I explore
     deeper into the song and see the demoscene influence.
     (Reviewed for In Tune, Static Line issue #33)

  "GDream - We Are Not Alone (Nightflower's Space Invasion Remix)"
     By: Nightflowers
     (IT Format)

     This is one of my favorite Trance tunes from the past year.  As I
     said in my past review: I wish I had the original to this song.  It
     would be my hope that hearing the original before I hear this remix
     would make me more impressed with this version.  Regardless, this is
     a tune that I have on my workout play list, and it's one I'm glad to
     have in my collection.
     (Reviewed for In Tune, Static Line issue #33)

  "Passion on Craq"
     By: Mickrip
     (IT Format)

     One of the oldskool trackers is still tracking today for Fairlight.
     The man has some of the most original music in the scene today,
     though I admit his tracking style still remains along oldskool lines.
     Regardless, this rock tune is very interesting to listen to, and
     worthy of an honorable mention for this years year end review.
     (Reviewed for In Tune, Static Line issue #35)

  "March With Me"
     By:  Subliminal
     (IT Format)

     I'm not exactly sure how you would classify this song.  Maybe rave,
     maybe trance?  It doesn't matter, though.  The point is that the song
     is full of energy, and you'll be moving when you hear it.  I've known
     subliminal for a very long time.  This remains as one of his best
     songs that I've ever heard.  It's filled with lots of break beats,
     and plenty of other things going on.  You'll listen to this a few
     times, and notice something new every time.  I'll admit, this isn't a
     tune for everyone, as it can be very hardcore.  But, many will like
     it even still.

  "Thandava: Dance of Shiva"
     By: Ivory
     (IT Format)

     Honestly, I don't have any clue where I got this song.  But it sits
     on my hard drive, and I gave it a listen the other day.  It's a Goa
     Trance tune, and one of the most interesting I've ever heard.  Goa is
     a very interesting style, and one that is, in my opinion, very
     difficult to carry out well.  The work with the acid synths alone
     could drive anyone mad.  In something like Buzz or Psycle, or with a
     hardware synthesizer, this might not be such a difficult style.  But
     Ivory wrote this in an IT format -- so there was a lot of time put
     into this tune.  This is one fact that is very obvious.  "Thandava"
     is another tune that I have added to my workout play list, as it
     fills me with energy.

  "Where's My Sauna?"
     By:  Andromeda
     (XM Format)

     Apparently, Andromeda is pretty angry about the fact that he cannot
     find his sauna.  This is a a Drum & Base tune with some trance mixed
     in.  The feeling portrayed by the song is actually a feeling of
     confusion.  The percussion seems very angry, yet the leads seem to be
     very calm and reserved.  It's not a tune for everyone, but again,
     it's something that a lot of you will have respect for.

  "A Dark Vision"
     By: Zaril
     (MP3 Format)

     This is a tune that you can grab from the Hellven website.  "A Dark
     Vision" is a bit of a jazzy tune.  It's obvious that Zaril spent a
     great deal of time doing some post-mixing.  The song may be a bit
     repetative, but it is worth a good listen.  I tend to play this song
     in the background while I work.  The quality of this song, and the
     quality of the FX alone, will give you reason enough to appreciate
     this tune.

  "Dreamcoat"
     By: Mistrial
     (MP3 Format)

     Another tune you can grab from the Hellven website.  It's a relaxing
     tune that has a great deal of influence from the Ambient, Trance and
     Drum & Base styles.  Classification is not important for songs of
     this nature.  The name for this song almost says it all.  When you
     listen to this tune, you are wrapped in a completely different world,
     a world in which your dreams seem to be controlled by music -- the
     music of Mistrial.  This is one of those tunes that has layer upon
     layer of different sounds.  The longer you listen to the song, the
     more layers are added.  You will find that you no longer control your
     thoughts or emotions when you listen to this song.
     (Reviewed for In Tune, Static Line issue #37)

  "Early Mourning"
     By: Chimera
     (MP3 Format)

     Grab this from the Hellven website as well.  How many scene tunes do
     you hear with lyrics?  This is one, and the lyrics are of pretty good
     quality.  Honestly, the lyrics sound familiar.  I don't know if this
     is a remix of a commercial song or not.  Regardless, this song is
     incredibly well done, and probably ranking among my favorites of all
     time.  There is some incredible post-mixing as well, especially with
     the bone-chilling echos throughout the song.

  "K2 (The Race - Part I)"
     By: Wayfinder
     (MP3 Format)

     Wayfinder always seems to find his way onto my lists.  Well, this is
     the first of his that reaches it this year.  As always is the case
     with Wayfinder, this is another tune.  Filled with energy,
     inspiration and time, this tune is no exception to the ever standing
     quality music that comes from the mind of Wayfinder.  Any trance fan,
     or any Wayfinder fan will find this song as a favorite.

  "Resurrection (The Race - Part IV)"
     By: Wayfinder
     (MP3 Format)

     Again, the man makes it onto my list.  Actually, this song is on
     several lists of mine:  this year end review list, my favorites of
     all time and my workout play list.  In the style of Robert Miles,
     this trance tune is filled with strings and pianos.  But, in the
     style of Wayfinder, you also get a tune packed with some really high
     quality synthesized electronic riffs that fill out the song and give
     it content.  The man is a genious, and this song demonstrates it.
     That is why this is one of my favorite songs of all time.
     (Reviewed for In Tune, Static Line issue #31)

  "Borneo is Fallen, My Dear"
     By: Ranger Rick
     (MP3 Format)

     This is one tune that you will have to grab from the SceneSpot ftp
     server.  Ranger Rick has his own directory on that server, and within
     that he has a directory for his album:  "Yes Chernobrov, It's a Time
     Machine".   Ranger Rick is one of those trackers that would drive
     you nuts.  He can finish a song in less than a day, and have it
     mixed and finalized for you the next day.  He is incredibly
     talented, and has a lot of inspiration from many different sources.
     This tune demonstrates his abilities and his talents.  The
     percussion is incredible, the leads are wonderful and the chorus is
     tight.  And the crazy part about all this, if you were to ask him
     what he thinks of his music -- he'll tell you that he isn't that
     good.  The poor guy doesn't seem to understand his own talent.

  "Warlock"  (Coplan's 2001 Favorite)
     By: Caravan
     (MP3 Format)

     This tune is most easily gotten from the "Cadence & Cascade" demo by
     Andromeda Software Development (ASD) which was created for Digital
     Nexus '01.  It took first place there.  The demo can be found on
     scene.org.  Plain and simple, the song is incredible.  It is the type
     of tune that one might find in the late '60s.  But it's not, it's new
     and its very original.  There is a full orchestra, a very talented
     drummer, and a really good Hummand Organ player.  It's even got the
     electric guitar solos in it.  I can listen to this tune over and over
     again, and I will never grow bored.  If you watch it with the demo,
     it makes for an exciting time.  You start to question whether you
     were injected with some sort of illegal drug.  But, you weren't, and
     it's still a great tune.  I highly recommend this song for anyone to
     download.  It is by far my favorite tune of the year 2001.


                --Coplan

     "In Tune" is a regular column dedicated to the review of original and
  singular works by fellow trackers.  It is to be used as a tool to expand
  your listening and writing horizons, but should not be used as a general
  rating system.  Coplan's opinions are not the opinions of the Static
  Line Staff.

     If you have heard a song you would like to recommend (either your own,
  or another person's), We can be contacted through e-mail useing the
  addresses found in the closing notes.  Please do not send files attached
  to e-mail without first contacting us.  Thank you!


--=--=--
--=--=------=--=------=--=----
  The Listener
     A Hypothetical Multi-Artist CD from 2001
  By:  Tryhuk
----=--=------=--=------=--=--

     I thought it wouldn't be bad at all to represent the "best of the
  scene music in 2001" in a form of a CD. Tracks are not sorted according
  their quality, I rather picked them to create a specific mood, to
  respect and materialize the idea behind the scene and of course to
  represent the best what has been born there during this year and what
  went through my years.

  1. 2sided - Esem
     Very appropriate song to open the CD. It is a typical "esem" song with
  repetitive loops, ambient mood and all signs of minimalist music.

  2. Neo - krii
     I had to decide which track to pick for this close selection. The
  second one I though on was "Blunt Times", both representing the unique
  style of krii.

  3. depeche mode - world in my eyes (alphaconspiracy mix)
     Third track is a right moment for a style break in the playlist. I
  picked this remix of a depeche mode song not only because of the
  comeback of alphaconspiracy back to scene, but also because of the
  undeniable quality of the remix which brings to the song something of
  its own and makes sometimes too repetitive DM music more interesting.

  4. blaktroniks (moving/tdr) - fais moi fremir
     Of course, one of the major changes in music scene was TDR's move to a
  new sound. It is characteristic by much more frequent use of vocals,
  saxophones and other instruments that can't be reproduced using the
  classic tracking techniques without the use of big samples. In addition
  to this, "fais moi fremir" is a very nice song.

  5. tori amos - slinky red thing (gun purist rmx)
     After calm track 4 has to come something more dynamic but not too
  aggressive. I reached again for a remix, this time of a tori amos song.
  All I want to say about this song that I appreciate that the author of
  the remix respected original and unique style of tori amos and made the
  song "within the limits".

  6. m. altemark - creating dissent
     We've reached the middle of the CD and so its time to wake up the
  sound. There's no doubt that this place belongs to "creating dissent" by
  altemark, a song represented on hellven musicdisk "urbanism". The song
  features itself with an aggressive of not that frequent style.
  Definitely one of the "must hear" songs of the year 2001.

  7. ...presenting superbeat - funkymuskrat
     This track has been reviewed in previous issue. Check it out.

  8. fun tourist - ddd
     The triad of electronic songs is closed up by an excellent song by
  fun tourist. It is definitely one of the all time "mono" releases within
  the major trend of this electronic group. It mixes distorted sounds and
  structures with melodic elements in an exceptional way and once again a
  "must hear" song of the year 2001.

  9. krii / tokyo dawn records - blunt times
     For the calm down I decide to pick the second song of krii I already
  mentioned. No matter whether you download "Neo" or "Blunt times", both
  tunes are nice music to addict to.

  10. Xerxes / Fairlight - Unik
     Although I don't consider this song as a one that belongs among the
  top songs of this year, I decided to use it to spice up the sound of the
  playlist. A typical ambient chill out music.

  11. nagz-goodnight kiss
     As we have moved into an ambient sound, this small piece of music came
  on my mind. Only non mp3 release in this playlist as a reminiscence to
  the scene past. Doesn't it remind you on the times when we have listened
  to ambient songs of Dune?

  12. nox luce - night light
     It is time to close the playlist. Let's get back from dreams back to
  real world and there's no better track than "Night Light" with its house
  beat and sounds that bring back funk and blues and push it forward to
  21st century.

  That's it, I hope you'll get the songs and run again through the
  selection with the sound in your years, I'm a bit sad that I didn't give
  to static line what I wanted this year. I wish you a good and
  interesting year 2002.

                --Tryhuk


--=--=--
--=--=------=--=------=--=----
  Screen Lit Vertigo
     Several Demos from 2001
  By:  Seven
----=--=------=--=------=--=--

  Random remark:

     I recently had a problem: several demos that used fmod as soundengine,
  didn't play any music at all. Even some older demos that I'm sure *did*
  work before, had this problem. I guess it's because I installed the
  DX8.1 SDK debug version, but I'm not sure. Anyway, by downloading the
  latest fmod (www.fmod.org/files/fmod340.zip) and overwriting the old
  fmod.dll with the new one for each demo, I managed to get the music
  working again. I thought I'd should mention this in case others have the
  same problem...

  Test machine for all demos:
     PIII 900 640MB, SB1024, GeForce 2MX 32MB, Win98



  -=- De Profundis by Kolor (final version) -=-

  Found at www.kaoz.org/kolor
  1st place at the Dialogo 2001 democompo.

  System requirements:
     PIII, 10.5 MB HD, 3D card with OpenGL support (this final works also
     with TNT2 cards and has a lowmem option for PCs with only 128 MB mem)

  The Credits:
     Shiva: code
     Noize: 3D & textures
     Raytrayza: Music & typographic design

  The Demo:
     De Profundis is inspired by a poem with the same name from Georg
  Trakl. You can find the text at:

     http://www.gutenberg.aol.de/trakl/gedichte/profundi.htm
     (if you can read German)

     If you can't read German, use Babelfish:
     http://babelfish.altavista.com

     The demo is pure 3D, showing desolate fields dotted with power
  lines, some abandoned farming vehicles, an empty cabin housing a lonely
  spider, a rusty silo, some weeping willows next to a stream, ... you get
  the feeling. Everything is colored in depressing shades of brown, gray
  and green, and flashing gray lines and stains adds to the impression of
  watching an old, worn-out movie. The pulsing light started to annoy me
  after a while, though. The animation of the black raven hopping on a
  fence is quite good, and the model is so detailed you can see the
  individual feathers in the wings, but the rest of the animations are
  simple to nonexistent. The textures on all models are very detailed and
  realistic. There are some stylish calligraphic logos for the title and
  the credits, I suppose those are the reason you can only chose two
  resolutions to watch the demo (640*480 and 1024*768, others would
  probably suffer from aliasing). The music is a slow, dark tune,
  dominated by the percussion, and with plaintive "haaa"-voicesamples in
  the background, but with little melody. It's stored in MO3 format: a
  module whose samples are compressed with MP3, the best of both worlds.
  Pity it isn't used in more demos...

  Overall:
     The demo succeeds very well in evoking the mood of the poem, but
  since that mood is a dark, desperate one, you probably won't watch it
  very often. It's sure worth checking out, but like a story-demo, it
  becomes boring after a few times.


  -=- pandaLIZATION by Frogwize (party-version) -=-

  Found at www.scene.org
  1st place at the Dreamhack 2001 democompo.

  System requirements:
     PIII 500, 9.5 MB HD, Geforce or better, "lots of ram"

  The Credits:
     Code: phatcat
     2D/3D: skinny p
     Music: qwan/Uprough

  The Demo:
     Only 6 weeks after Frogwize won 2nd place at TRSAC with Don Quijote,
  this 2-man team is back with pandaLIZATION and actually won the
  dreamhack compo with it! Congratulations to those hard workers! Panda
  has a very similar style to Don: heavy 3D visuals showing fragments of a
  story, supported by minimalistic 2D overlays with slogans like
  "Government instruction: have a HAPPY day". The main actors are a
  strange lonely cyborg in an appartment, and a swarm of little flying
  robots with spraycans, with freedom and creativity as the main themes.
  It's obvious that a lot of thought has gone in the 3D models: they are
  very  detailed and original. The cyborg has big, symphatic eyes, which
  are offset by the thin, needle-like fingers. You can see his "hart"
  beating, and when he "eats" his meal, a small dial on his head turns (to
  the "full energy" position, I imagine). If you pay attention, you notice
  the walls of the appartment changing color when a green holographic
  screen folds out, like radiosity. Unfortunately, all this eyecandy comes
  at a price: you need some serious 3D hardware to enjoy it. Fiddling with
  the OpenGL settings of the driver (force 16 bit, vertical sync always of
  etc) helped a lot, but I still have a few half-a-second freezes, which
  accumulate till the music is several seconds out of sync :( This is
  especially bad, because the music switches between a slow, ambient tune
  during the cyborg scenes, and a faster dnb-ish track for the swarm
  scenes, plus there are many sound effects such as typing at a keybord or
  the hissing of a spraypaint can that suffer from the delay.

  Overall:
     Ignoring the HW requirements, pandaLIZATION is a great demo:
  thought-provoking story/theme, fitting soundtrack, and visuals that are
  so detailed I kept  finding new things after watching it five times. The
  "geforce or better" in the requirements is overly optimistic, though,
  and may be a remnant of the Don Quijote demo (just as the logo in the
  setup window). But if you've a geforce 2 or higher, you've no excuse not
  to watch this.


  -=- Virtual Vodka by Fairlight (party-version) -=-

  Found at www.scene.org
  2nd place at the Dreamhack 2001 democompo.

  System requirements: Pentium 233, 9.4 MB HD, 64 MB ram, DirectX 8.0

  The Credits:
     Code: Pantaloon
     2D-gfx: Graffik, Aln
     3D-gfx: Forge
     Music: Bliss

  The Demo:
     The info file describes Virtual Vodka as "a 100% beer demo". But even
  when they are drunk, Fairlight makes better demos than the average
  demogroup. Their latest production is a typical effect-demo with lots of
  detached parts and a couple of 3D scenes thrown in. Each part has a
  little nameplate, such as "The forest of life" or "radial rabbiwaaf x".
  Variations on morphing blobs and very smooth radial blur are plentiful,
  plus things like map distortion and double-textured backgrounds. Nothing
  new or special, but it looks good.  The blue globe with lightning at the
  end is nice too. The 3D scenes are not very original: a forest with lots
  of identical plants and trunk-only trees, a tomb in a crypt with another
  morphing blob above it. The monks in the monastry move OK, but the
  particle fire looks artificial. Most of the transitions are fade-in,
  fade-out, but there's one where the previous scene breaks in hundreds of
  little squares, which fly away into the next scene. It's been done
  before, but real transitions are so seldom used today that it's nice to
  see it again. Besides the familiar Fairlight logo at the start, there
  are two full-screen pictures, one title screen with an evil head, and
  another featuring a big flesh-eating plant with a big eye and lots of
  teeth. They're both a bit blurry, though.

     The music is a typical demo-tune: it starts a bit theatrical, then
  goes into a happy melody with bells and piano. It changes a lot,
  sometimes it cuts down to percussion only, or it softens and then jumps
  back to full force. Near the end some unintelligible voice samples are
  used, and it finishes with a  presumptuous "Legends never die!". Nice
  tune, but syncing is almost non-existing.

  Overall:
     Virtual Vodka is an average Fairlight demo, no spectacular new
  effects, but nothing ugly either. The speed of the demo is fast enough
  to avoid boredom, the music is good, and the system requirements are low
  enough to let everybody watch it.


  -=- Elements by Haujobb (party-version) -=-

  Found at www.scene.org
  1st place at The Party 2001 democompo.

  System requirements:
     20 MB HD, Windows, a 3D card, no infofile so you've to guess :(

  The Credits:
     Code: Cynic, Droid
     Graphics: Visualice
     Music: Virgil, Tasmium

  The Demo:
     The results from The Party were available last night, so I could
  review the winner just in time for the Static Line deadline. Elements is
  a big demo (20 meg, 11 zipped), but it's worth it. It starts with a
  couple of metallic blobs with tentacles flying in a train-like fashion
  through a futuristic landscape. The buildings are not in 3D, but
  beautiful painted backgrounds, and the strange train moves through them
  seamlessly. The rest of the demo is more abstract, with 3D object
  looking like a cross-over between flowers and spiders, with long
  tentacles reaching for something. At one moment, several of them come
  together, like a puzzle, aligning their spikes towards a center of
  light. White schematics and texts scroll over the screen, moving at the
  same relaxed speed as the objects. There are many backgrounds images, in
  the fanciful Visualice style, but some are barely visible behind the
  effects. Take a look at the data directory to enjoy them fully, some of
  them aren't even shown in the demo (Title2 or waterfall f.e.) A minor
  peeve I have are the ugly jpeg artifacts in some places, like the dried
  up ground, the shadow of the spider at the end, and a few of the texts.
  Why you would squeeze a 512*512 image to 7.5 kb, if you include another
  image as a 700 kb png (lossless compressed) where you can use a mask, is
  beyond me. The music is an ambient track with a few idm-ish beeps and
  ploinks. It's very relaxed, and fits the mood of the demo very well.
  There are some voice samples that don't add much to it IMHO: the rap
  about the party seems like a cheap way to get votes from the TP
  visitors, and as I'm not into drugs, the "I'm high, take a smoke" text
  is wasted on me. Otherwise, it's a very enjoyable tune.

  Overall:
     Elements is another high-quality Haujobb production, which certainly
  deserved the first place (No hard feelings hybris/NEMESIS, but I hope
  that 2nd-place demo was *really* released due to some error). Everything
  fits nicely together, giving you a 5 minute break from this stressful
  world. The only thing that's missing is an info file with requirements,
  which could spare some modem owners a hefty download ...


                --Seven
                  Wishing everyone a happy 2002!


--=--=--
--=--=------=--=------=--=----
  Editorial
     A Challenge for 2002
  By: Coplan
----=--=------=--=------=--=--

  I would be telling an untruth if I were to say that I would like to see
  the scene remain as it is, or as it was.  The fact is, the scene is
  always changing, always evolving.  2001 was no exception.  I don't
  expect 2002 to be an exception either.  These little tidbits might sound
  like a huge fortune cookie...but you'll get the idea.

  For the Coders:
     The demoscene has always been a scene of innovation.  In 2002, you
  should be innovating.  You should make every effort to innovate more
  than you ever did.  When creating demos, celebrate the oldskool tricks
  and effects, but expand on them.  Code variations on old techniques and
  create new effects of your own.  Be the first to do something, and you
  will be remembered by all.

  For the 2d Artists:
     When I first got into the scene, there were two types of artists:
  pixelers and ANSI artists.  Neither of which was very easy to do.  But
  those are artists of the past, and while they are still honored and
  revered these days, I'd be willing to bet that a great deal of you use
  things like Photoshop.  I have heard too many times that "Photoshop
  useing artists have no place in the scene."  But you and I know that
  Photoshop has its place, so long as one knows how to use it.  Your
  technique is not to simply edit existing photos.  You create new
  dimensions, and new worlds with your tools.  Carve your niche, and
  demonstrate to the ignorant that you belong.

  For the 3d Artists:
     Many people don't separate 2d and 3d artists.  I don't know why that
  is, and I'm sure you don't either.  In the world of demos, you are very
  valuable.  You can create 3d models that coders can use to make their
  demos.  If they don't think of that, remind them.  You are an essential
  part to the creation of such demos, and you are often overlooked until
  the time comes.  And even then, a coder might not understand your
  techniques...and therefore has difficulty understanding your place.
  You can help to change the scene into the scene of tomorrow.

  For the Musicians:
     In the early years of the scene, the name of the game was small file
  size, and catchy tunes.  While you still write catchy tunes, the name of
  the game has changed.  It's all about quality now.  Your medium, more
  than any other aspect of the scene, is more fragile than one might
  expect.  Different players play things differently, and your tune might
  not be heard the way you wrote it.  Keep this in mind when you release a
  tune.  While it is often criticized, MP3s are starting to take their
  place in the scene, and with good reason.  An MP3 is the most portable
  format out there, and the one format that should sound perfectly the
  same reglardless of what player is playing it.  Ignore what the critics
  say, if they criticize...they're lost in the scene of yesterday.  But
  anyone with their ear to the scene knows that you can't limit yourself
  in such ways.  You too can innovate in music, be it with your
  synthesizers, with Buzz or Psycle, with your oldskool tracker or
  whatever.  You hold the ear of the scene, and you must keep that in mind
  as the scene continues to evolve.  After all, the music has changed the
  most since the scene's birth.

  For Everyone:
     Whether you're a participant, or just an observer, this is your time
  to inflect your influences.  You can offer criticism and you can offer
  your best product.  Either of which will help to steer the scene in a
  given direction, even if it is a minutely small change in direction.
  My point is, too many people give up because they think they have no
  impact.  But here I am with almost 300 readers now, and I wouldn't have
  dreamed of having any impact more than three years ago.  I am one man,
  but I have an influence on the scene, even if it is small (300 readers
  out of how many scene members?  That's a very small fraction).  I don't
  mean to be arrogant, but it's true.  The scene is filled with lots of
  Gene Wie's, Necros' and Coplans.  Everywhere you turn, you'll see or
  meet another Snowman or another Phoenix.  Every time you jump in #trax,
  you see the name Basehead with a moderator flag next to his name.
  Everyone in the scene has a story to tell, and I assure you that
  everyone has some impact on the scene, so long as they put their minds
  to it.  Years ago, Maelcum put his mind to create a demogroup.  Even
  today, the word Kosmic will always hold a place in scene.  Hornet
  Archive might close, but how many servers have picked up in their
  tracks?  Sure, it's not quite Hornet, but the demoscene has lived on,
  and it has evolved.  And who did that?  It wasn't the Hornet guys.  It
  was other guys like you.  I hope I am the inspiration that makes you
  the next Jeffrey Lim, creating one of the most famous tracking programs
  on the web today.  How old is that  program, and it's still one of the
  most widely used?  How would you like to be that guy with your name in
  the credits for that program?  Why not try?  I hope I might be the
  inspiration to make you want to be the next Seven, one of the best, and
  most widely publicized demo reviewers in the scene today.  If you don't
  think that any demo group isn't honored when Seven reviews one of their
  demos, you're wrong.  I know for a fact that anyone is honored to get
  their demo mentioned by Seven.  And I know that many groups try hard to
  get their demos reviewed by anyone.  They strive for it.  They work for
  it.  They work hard to get their art recognized...and if you happen to
  be that guy that offers your criticism, then you might be the guy who
  sets a mold of expectation.  People might turn to you and say "you know
  what?  Your ideas and your thoughts make a lot of sense.  Next time I
  make a demo, I will take your comments into consideration, and strive
  to make the best demo I have ever done."  Imagine getting that e-mail
  in your inbox.  Wouldn't you like to be that guy?

     My point is a very simple one.  Just because you're one person
  doesn't  mean that you can't help the scene to evolve.  You have it
  within your  power to make a change in the demoscene, no matter how
  large or how  small.  The future of the scene lies more in your hands
  than you might  believe.  The future of the scene depends more on you
  than you could  ever dream.  The sooner you realize that, the sooner
  tomorrow will come.

     So I challenge you:  In the year 2002, I challenge you to be
  everything you can be for the scene, and to do everything that you can
  possibly do.  You will find yourself one day writing an article for The
  Root, and you will wonder what has made you deserve such an honor.  And
  it will be  myself, or someone like me, to tell you that "You have made
  a huge influence on the scene to bring it to where it is today."

     That could be you.  If you try hard, that will be you.

                --Coplan


--=--=--
--=--=------=--=------=--=----
  Link List
----=--=------=--=------=--=--

  Portals:

      Orange Juice.............................http://www.ojuice.net
      Scene.org.................................http://www.scene.org
      SceneSpot.............................http://www.scenespot.org
      CFXweb.......................................http://cfxweb.net
      Pouet.net.................................http://www.pouet.net
      Demoscene.org.........................http://www.demoscene.org
      Scenet....................................http://www.scenet.de
      Demo.org...................................http://www.demo.org
      Czech Scene................................http://www.scene.cz
      Danish Scene..............................http://demo-scene.dk
      Hungarian Scene........................http://www.scene-hu.com
      Italian Scene...........................http://run.to/la_scena
      ModPlug Central Resources..........http://www.castlex.com/mods
      Norvegian Scene............http://www.neutralzone.org/scene.no
      Planet Zeus..........................http://www.planetzeus.net
      Polish Scene...........................http://www.demoscena.pl
      Russian Scene..........................http://www.demoscene.ru
      Spanish Scene............................http://www.escena.org
      Swiss Scene..............................http://www.chscene.ch

  Archives:

      Acid2.....................................ftp://acid2.stack.nl
      Amber.......................................ftp://amber.bti.pl
      Cyberbox.....................................ftp://cyberbox.de
      Hornet (1992-1996)........................ftp://ftp.hornet.org
      Scene.org..................................ftp://ftp.scene.org
      Scene.org Austra........................ftp://ftp.au.scene.org
      Scene.org Netherlands...................ftp://ftp.nl.scene.org
      Swiss Scene FTP...........................ftp://ftp.chscene.ch

  Demo Groups:

      3g Design..............................http://3gdesign.cjb.net
      3State...................................http://threestate.com
      7 Gods.........................................http://7gods.sk
      Aardbei.....................................http://aardbei.com
      Acid Rain..............................http://surf.to/acidrain
      Addict..................................http://addict.scene.pl
      Agravedict........................http://www.agravedict.art.pl
      Alien Prophets...................http://alienprophets.ninja.dk
      Anakata..............................http://www.anakata.art.pl
      Astral..............................http://astral.scene-hu.com
      Astroidea........................http://astroidea.scene-hu.com
      BlaBla..............................http://blabla.planet-d.net
      Blasphemy..............................http://www.blasphemy.dk
      Bomb..................................http://bomb.planet-d.net
      Broncs..................................http://broncs.scene.cz
      Byterapers.....................http://www.byterapers.scene.org
      Bypass.................................http://bypass.scene.org
      Calodox.................................http://www.calodox.org
      Cocoon..............................http://cocoon.planet-d.net
      Confine.................................http://www.confine.org
      Damage...................................http://come.to/damage
      Delirium..............................http://delirium.scene.pl
      Eclipse............................http://www.eclipse-game.com
      Elitegroup..........................http://elitegroup.demo.org
      Exceed...........................http://www.inf.bme.hu/~exceed
      Fairlight.............................http://www.fairlight.com
      Fobia Design...........................http://www.fd.scene.org
      Freestyle............................http://www.freestylas.org
      Fresh! Mindworks...................http://kac.poliod.hu/~fresh
      Future Crew..........................http://www.futurecrew.org
      Fuzzion.................................http://www.fuzzion.org
      GODS...................................http://www.idf.net/gods
      Halcyon...........................http://www.halcyon.scene.org
      Haujobb..................................http://www.haujobb.de
      Hellcore............................http://www.hellcore.art.pl
      Infuse...................................http://www.infuse.org
      Kilobite...............................http://kilobite.cjb.net
      Kolor................................http://www.kaoz.org/kolor
      Komplex.................................http://www.komplex.org
      Kooma.....................................http://www.kooma.com
      Mandula.........................http://www.inf.bme.hu/~mandula
      Maturefurk...........................http://www.maturefurk.com
      Monar................ftp://amber.bti.pl/pub/scene/distro/monar
      MOVSD....................................http://movsd.scene.cz
      Nextempire...........................http://www.nextempire.com
      Noice.....................................http://www.noice.org
      Orange.................................http://orange.scene.org
      Orion................................http://orion.planet-d.net
      Outbreak................................http://www.outbreak.nu
      Popsy Team............................http://popsyteam.rtel.fr
      Prone................................http://www.prone.ninja.dk
      Purple....................................http://www.purple.dk
      Rage........................................http://www.rage.nu
      Replay.......................http://www.shine.scene.org/replay
      Retro A.C...........................http://www.retroac.cjb.net
      Sista Vip..........................http://www.sistavip.exit.de
      Skytech team............................http://www.skytech.org
      Spinning Kids......................http://www.spinningkids.org
      Sunflower.......................http://sunflower.opengl.org.pl
      Talent.............................http://talent.eurochart.org
      The Black Lotus.............................http://www.tbl.org
      The Digital Artists Wired Nation.http://digitalartists.cjb.net
      The Lost Souls...............................http://www.tls.no
      TPOLM.....................................http://www.tpolm.com
      Trauma.................................http://sauna.net/trauma
      T-Rex.....................................http://www.t-rex.org
      Unik........................................http://www.unik.de
      Universe..........................http://universe.planet-d.net
      Vantage..................................http://www.vantage.ch
      Wipe....................................http://www.wipe-fr.org

  Music Labels, Music Sites:

      Aisth.....................................http://www.aisth.com
      Aural Planet........................http://www.auralplanet.com
      Azure...................................http://azure-music.com
      Blacktron Music Production...........http://www.d-zign.com/bmp
      BrothomStates.............http://www.katastro.fi/brothomstates
      Chill..........................http://www.bentdesign.com/chill
      Chippendales......................http://www.sunpoint.net/~cnd
      Chiptune...............................http://www.chiptune.com
      Da Jormas................................http://www.jormas.com
      Fabtrax......http://www.cyberverse.com/~boris/fabtrax/home.htm
      Fairlight Music.....................http://fairlight.scene.org
      Five Musicians.........................http://www.fm.scene.org
      Fusion Music Crew.................http://members.home.nl/cyrex
      Goodstuff..........................http://artloop.de/goodstuff
  <*> Hellven.................................http://www.hellven.org
      Ignorance.............................http://www.ignorance.org
      Immortal Coil.............................http://www.ic.l7.net
      Intense...........................http://intense.ignorance.org
      Jecoute.................................http://jecoute.cjb.net
      Kosmic Free Music Foundation.............http://www.kosmic.org
      Lackluster.....................http://www.m3rck.net/lackluster
      Level-D.................................http://www.level-d.com
      Miasmah.............................http://www.miasmah.cjb.net
      Milk.......................................http://milk.sgic.fi Mah
      Music.............................http://come.to/mah.music Maniacs
      of noise...............http://home.worldonline.nl/~mon MAZ's sound
      homepage..................http://www.maz-sound.com
      Med.......................................http://www.med.fr.fm
      Mo'playaz..........................http://ssmedion.de/moplayaz
      Mono211.................................http://www.mono211.com
      Morbid Minds..............http://www.raveordie.com/morbidminds
      Noise................................http://www.noisemusic.org
      Noerror.......................http://www.error-404.com/noerror One
      Touch Records......................http://otr.planet-d.net
      Park..................................http://park.planet-d.net
      pHluid..................................http://phluid.acid.org
      Radical Rhythms.....http://www.andrew.cmu.edu/user/merrelli/rr RBi
      Music.............................http://www.rbi-music.com Ruff
      Engine................http://members.xoom.com/ruff_engine
      SHR8M......................................http://1st.to/shr8m Sound
      Devotion................http://sugarbomb.x2o.net/soundev
      Soundstate.........................http://listen.to/soundstate
      Sunlikamelo-D...........http://www.error-404.com/sunlikamelo-d
      Suspect Records........................http://www.tande.com/sr
      Tequila........................http://www.defacto2.net/tequila
      Tempo................................http://tempomusic.cjb.net
      Tetris....................................http://msg.sk/tetris
      Theralite...........................http://theralite.avalon.hr Tokyo
      Dawn Records........................http://tokyodawn.org Triad's C64
      music archive.............http://www.triad.c64.org
      UltraBeat.........................http://www.innerverse.com/ub
      Vibrants................................http://www.vibrants.dk
      Wiremaniacs.........................http://www.wiremaniacs.com Zen
      of Tracking.........................http://surf.to/the-imm

  Programming:

      Programming portal......................http://www.gamedev.net
      Programming portal.....................http://www.flipcode.com
      Game programming portal...............http://www.gamasutra.com
      3D programming portal.................http://www.3dgamedev.com
      Programming portal......................http://www.exaflop.org
      Programming portal............http://www.programmersheaven.com
      Programming portal.....................http://www.freecode.com
      NASM (free Assembly compiler)......http://www.cryogen.com/nasm
      LCC (free C compiler).........http://www.remcomp.com/lcc-win32
      PTC video engine.........................http://www.gaffer.org
      3D engines..........http://cg.cs.tu-berlin.de/~ki/engines.html
      Documents...............http://www.neutralzone.org/home/faqsys
      File format collection...................http://www.wotsit.org

  Magazines:

      Amber...............................http://amber.bti.pl/di_mag
      Amnesia...............http://amnesia-dist.future.easyspace.com
      Demojournal....................http://demojournal.planet-d.net
      Eurochart.............................http://www.eurochart.org
      Heroin...................................http://www.heroin.net
      Hugi........................................http://www.hugi.de
      Music Massage......................http://www.scene.cz/massage
      Pain..................................http://pain.planet-d.net
      Scenial...........................http://www.scenial.scene.org
      Shine...............................http://www.shine.scene.org
      Static Line................http://www.scenespot.org/staticline
      Sunray..............................http://sunray.planet-d.net
      TUHB.......................................http://www.tuhb.org
      WildMag..................................http://www.wildmag.de

  Parties:

      Assembly (Finland).....................http://www.assembly.org
      Ambience (The Netherlands)..............http://www.ambience.nl
      Dreamhack (Sweden)....................http://www.dreamhack.org
      Buenzli (Switzerland)......................http://www.buenz.li
      Gravity (Poland)............http://www.demoscena.cp.pl/gravity
      Mekka-Symposium (Germany)...................http://ms.demo.org
      Takeover (The Netherlands).............,http://www.takeover.nl
      The Party (Denmark).....................http://www.theparty.dk

  Others:

      Demo secret parts....http://www.inf.bme.hu/~mandula/secret.txt
      Textmode Demo Archive.................http://tmda.planet-d.net
      Arf!Studios..........................http://www.arfstudios.org
      #coders..................................http://coderz.cjb.net
      Demonews Express.........http://www.teeselink.demon.nl/express
      Demo fanclub........................http://jerware.org/fanclub
      Digital Undergrounds.....................http://dug.iscool.net
      Doose charts...............................http://www.doose.dk
      Freax................................http://freax.scene-hu.com
      GfxZone............................http://gfxzone.planet-d.net
      PC-demos explained.....http://www.oldskool.org/demos/explained
      Pixel...................................http://pixel.scene.org
      #trax e-mail list.............................................
         .............http://www.scenespot.org/mailman/listinfo/trax
      Underground Mine.............http://www.spinningkids.org/umine

  IRC Channels:

      Scene.........................................ircnet #thescene
      Programming.....................................ircnet #coders
      Programming....................................efnet #flipcode
      Graphics.........................................ircnet #pixel
      Music.............................................ircnet #trax
      Scene (French)..................................ircnet #demofr
      Programming (French)............................ircnet #codefr
      Graphics (French)..............................ircnet #pixelfr
      Scene (Hungarian)............................ircnet #demoscene
      Programming (Hungarian)......................ircnet #coders.hu
      Programming (German)........................ircnet #coders.ger


--=--=--
----=--=------=--=------=--=------=--=------=--=------=--=------=--=------
  Editor:          Coplan / D. Travis North / coplan@scenespot.org
  Writers:         Coplan / D. Travis North / coplan@scenespot.org
                    Dilvish / Eric Hamilton / dilvie@yahoo.com
                    Psitron / Tim Soderstrom / tigerhawk@stic.net
                    Setec / Jesper Pederson / jesped@post.tele.dk
                    Seven / Stefaan VanNieuwenhuyze/ seven7@writeme.com
                    Tryhuk / Tryhuk Vojtech / vojtech.tryhuk@worldonline.cz
  Technical Consult: Ranger Rick / Ben Reed / ranger@scenespot.org

  Static Line on the Web:  http://www.scenespot.org/staticline

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     If you would like to contribute an article to Static Line, be aware
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     See you next month!

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