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_//\\________________________________________________________________________
_\\__T_A_T_I_C___L_I_N_E_______________________________________ August, 2000
__\\_________________________________________________________________________
\\//__ Monthly Scene E-Zine ________________________________ 137 Subscribers
_____________________________________________________________________________


--=--=--
--=--=------=--=------=--=----
  Table Of Contents
----=--=------=--=------=--=--
     Opening:
           Message From the Editor
     Features:
           The Root -- How they Got Involved (This Month: Vincent Voois)
           Inscene 2K Report
           FLaG 2000 - European Demoscene Meeting -- Final Results
     Columns:
        Music:
           In Tune -- Flashback: The Trax Weekly Days
           Guest Song Review -- n-voice ep by dizmal
           The Listener -- Music from Sense and Lime
           Retro Tunage -- Blue pearl by Basehead
        Demo:
           Screen Lit Vertigo -- Horizon'00 double review and
              "This Is" by Orion
           Guest Demo Review -- Flag 2000 Demo Reviews
           Intro Watch -- Flag 2000 and Inscene 2000 Intros
        General:
           Scene Dirt -- News & Rumors
           Editorial -- Are MP3s destroying the Music Scene?
           Link List -- Get Somewhere in the Scene
           Closing: Credits

--=--=--
--=--=------=--=------=--=----
  Message From the Editor
----=--=------=--=------=--=--
     It's official!  Static Line has been around for Two years.  That's
  right, we've been here for 24 complete issues since 1998.  Thanks go out
  to all the readers and of course my staff.

     We got an incredible issue for you all this month.  For one, we got
  reviews up the...uhm...you know.  Gekko out-did himself this month.
  Aside from his normal intro reviews, he also did a few extra demo
  reviews.  Seven has three demos to review himself...so if you're a demo
  fan, you got a lot to read this month.

     For you music lovers, you got a whole bunch to read as well.  For
  starters, we have a guest review from Eino Keskitalo.  Also as special
  for this issue, I have included the very first "In Tune" from the Trax
  Weekly days.  Then there are all the tunes reviewed by Tryhuk.

     Did I mention all the features this month?  For starters, we got
  another  installation of "The Root", brought to you by Tryhuk.  This
  month, Vincent Voois shares his views of the scene and a bit about his
  own history.  We also got a party report from Seven (king of the party
  reports) for Inscene 2k, and the final results for Flag 2000 (prepared
  by Gekko).

     Lastly, let me thank you all for your patience.  My brother is now
  officially moved in to Florida, and I am back from my vacation -- if you
  could call it that.  So, it's a week late, but I'm sure you all don't
  mind.


     I've been working on this for 5 hours now, and my head is spinning.
  I think I'll release it to you all now.

     Enjoy the 24th Issue.  Thanks for keeping us around for two years.

             --Coplan


--=--=--
--=--=------=--=------=--=----
  The Root
     How They Got Involved
  Sponsored By:  Tryhuk
  By: Vincent Voois
----=--=------=--=------=--=--

     About my involvement into the scene for as long as there was a period
  that people noticed me, the steps that got me into it were quite a
  loadsome before i got to the PC-scene...

     My music-activities done by computer started around 1985 on a Commodore
  C64, funny enough i got my fame in that scene when i wasn't active in
  the C64 world anymore, since 1990 / 1991 i bought a Commodore Amiga on
  which i learned using samples to compose modules.

     The fact that i could use four tracks or by use of some tricks: eight
  tracks (Oktalyzer) were my reasons to step over to Amiga. At that time
  the PC-scene was really awful regarding the music-parts around it. A
  truely good soundcard was, at most expensive level, an 8 bit soundcard
  that did not even came close to half the quality and warmth the Amiga
  had. The Amiga period for me was a learning stadium, I did release a
  couple of mods but nothing seriously, a period not really worth
  mentioning though it was important for my way of improvement. The only
  four-track mod that got online was the release of Dance Booster on the
  Party III in Herning (It did not make the bigscreen but was at least
  made downloadable).  Nice to know that the guys i looked up to on that
  machine were people like Dr. Awesome (/Cryptoburners), Nuke (/Anarchy),
  Dizzy (/CNCD) and a lot more people. The only two tunes from Dizzy i got
  determined my way of looking at samples and how to use them totally for
  the rest of my tracking career.

     It was at Herning were I noticed that development of the musical
  hardware for the PC improved incredibly.  It did not take me longer than
  a month after the Party III (Dec. 1993) in Denmark before i got a
  soundcard for my 486-Dx 25 Mhz machine (a soundblaster pro clone).
  Scanning the PC bbs's for decent tracker programs that did at least as
  much as Protracker 3.x on Amiga, I was a bit disappointed to find crappy
  DOS-trackers that were not even capable of playing the mod formats
  decently IF they supported the soundblaster card (meaning: no
  speaker-only output). On one BBS I was lucky and found the Future Crew's
  ScreamTracker 3. Finally a music application that offered me more than I
  (I'll admit: a bit arrogantly) demanded for my method of composing.
  Inspired on how the Vibrants used the possibilities of the OPL3 FM chip
  on the soundblaster / adlib cards even triggered me to compose a couple
  of Adlib songs in Screamtracker. When I noticed the Second Reality Demo
  I thought it was done by Kefrens since they made Desert Dreams II on
  Amiga which was alomost the same kind of demo but definately the same
  kind of music. Then I found out that it was done by the same Future Crew
  and that it won a PC demo compo... :) people should have known about
  Kefrens at the time :)

     At the Party IV, which was the last party that I attended abroad, I
  released an ST3 song, and that one of course did not make the big-screen
  either. But at least I was glad to find out that they have nice girls in
  Denmark :)

     In 1995 my soundblaster burned out, the next soundcard that I
  implemented was a Gravis Ultrasound Max, a choice merely because 90% of
  the demos that I downloaded held some kind of embargo against Creative
  Labs and their Soundblasters (and their clone mates). Also the second
  release of FastTracker became an important issue for me that year. It
  took me a couple of BBS sysops before i downloaded FT2 since i knew FT1
  and that one really "sucked major" to use oldschool terms. The fact that
  I downloaded FT2 (just for fun to have a very original version of
  nibbles) opened a new world for me. Also a good application that made
  the GUS patches a whole lot more valuable to use besides MIDI purposes.

     Up to 1995 I still was busy improving my methods of composing, around
  1995 i decided to make a debut attempt by joining a music-group and so
  my choice fell on the group "Destiny". The majority was against my
  admittance to the group with the reason that my style did not fit the
  group. Okay, that decision got me somehow into Acme. AAP (group leader
  Steven Ter Heide) contacted me with the request if i was intrested in
  joining to supply some songs for the bigger projects. I knew a couple of
  Vic's songs that I found pretty good (which later turned out to be even
  not his best work when I got the rest). And to clear one confusion some
  people had: I'm not Vic and Vic is not me so stop putting his name on my
  music and mine on his. I had to put my focus onto Lone Ranger's
  PolyTracker which was a private tracker only cirulating within the group
  and a couple of the closest friends.

     That also meant I had to go back to less extended possiblities.
  PolyTracker is something similar to ST3 though is way more focussed on
  tracking with one extra effect i have not seen in any other tracker yet
  up to date (Reversed sample offset playing, this is also not explained
  in the doc that describes its format). Also PolyTracker is limited to
  GUS use. What Lone Ranger did to the samples is still a riddle to me,
  but the way Polytracker played them and the way FastTracker II played
  them was something equal to playing your music on a dolby hi-fi set
  (PolyTracker) and playing the music through a tin can on a string
  (FT2).

     I made a couple of songs in Polytracker, the only serious
  demo-implementation of my work was done in "Afrodesiac", Acme's
  intension was to release it at the Party V in Denmark. I probably have
  some curse over me because that particular demo did not make the
  big-screen either. If you still have it, save it because it's a
  collectors item, I believe not many people have a copy of it anymore.

     I kept composing to compile a music-disk. I had aproximately 15
  Megs of modules and only one was seriously used. I could not blame Acme
  for that, the problem was that the modules were a bit too complex and
  expanded to make a nice demo around. I don't mean good but just to much
  CPU intensive to have something for other things. Psychologically my
  mind was not very good as I lived in isolation for a very long period
  (that's how I got all my inspiration). In the end of 1996 I got
  online and noticed the Hornet Archive. A good chance to download the
  demo's I could not get my hands on.... One of the better demo's that
  caught my eye at the time was Caero (EMF / Plant). From that period
  demo's only became better and better and significantly smaller and
  smaller (meaning:becoming truely a worthy opponent against Amiga). Not
  all demo's were there for my reach as my GUS only had 512K and my video
  card was not always supported not only that, up to late 1997 i still ran
  my 486 DX 25 while a P60 or P100 became minimum standards for the
  Demoscene. Considering my options (my low income and my vision for the
  upcoming years) made me decide to quit composing at that time and
  uploading the music-compilations to Hornet instead of letting Simm or
  Lone Ranger build a player around it.

     So watching demos and composing music went to the background until I had
  the money to upgrade to the faster standards. At least for watching
  demos.

     Most demos that I eagerly wanted to see, I had to wait a year or two
  before I had a CPU fast enough to view them. Once I could do that, I
  caught up pretty quick. It's very funny to actually "see" the evolution
  of demo-creations through two years in two days :)

     As composing went on....

     Yes, throwing up all the music onto the Hornet Archive caused some heavy
  response, for sure the goodbye message I included triggered people to
  write me to reconsider that. Even current days I sometimes get a
  reaction from a person asking me why I quit.

     January 1997 I just could not sit and do nothing. As I viewed the
  first spots of Impulse Tracker 2.10 - 2.12 I decided just to try and see
  if IT 2 was suitable for me. Well, it was a good eye-opener that
  supplied me the the power of necessary instrument handling without
  needing to manually edit multiple tracks for the effect I wanted to
  reach.

     But even today I still use multiple tracks to extend effects building
  up a sound environment that swirls through your head. I don't make
  Hi-Fi audio-set music, I make music that sounds proper on headphones but
  required more CPU power throughout the last years.

     The effect of DemoNews and TraxWeekly gave me some good insight on
  various trackers being busy in the PC-scene as I also learned from
  Acme's personal module archives (where i got the rest of Dizzy's songs)
  and I downloaded a whole smuck of modules from HA.

     I entered MC5 and MC6, I did not enter them to win, but to release
  some test songs wondering what the critics would say. I needed some good
  criticism on my work, and I acted upon what i got returned if the
  critics were objective and meaningfull.

     With the ending of HA in 1998, the hunger for critics was not over,
  so I entered the first couple of Groovy Compo's, having a supplied set
  of samples and limitations offered a new challenge to me, I found it
  pretty amusing and I enjoyed the opportunity of judging eachother's
  songs on smaller scale.

     With the coming of TraxInSpace -- the combination of HA and weekly or
  bi-weekly tracking compos -- a continueing story for the both of them
  became a fact. Next to it was actually right after HA died, the rising
  of scene.org. Currently even scene.org is into financial problems
  keeping the server running, like HA at the time lost it's support by
  Walnut Creek and the system maintainers have no motivations to keep the
  parts running....

     I still enjoy the scene and now and then I pick out a track from a
  musician to listen to. The modules grew in size and the limitations seem
  to be vanished in the use of tricks, stereo samples (large samples) and
  no less than 44Khz 16 bit if not 32 bit. The amount of people tracking
  currently is so large that each style-devision has it's best performer
  but are no longer the persons that rule the scene like Purple Motion /
  Skaven / Necros or music groups like FM, Analogue, KFMF....

     I still have some unfinished songs laying and waiting to be finished
  but it will take a while before I will continue with them as I'm
  currently in hibernation mode in tracking land.

     I have a nice girlfriend which is about to become my wife. I have a
  pretty busy job and a pretty busy life.

     I did learn a couple of important things during the years when
  tracking:

     -Feedback upon your work is important no matter how much self-critism
       you can apply on your own work. -Listen to a lot of other peoples
       work, it supplies inspiration at moments when you think you went
       out of it.
     -Good sample / instrument arrangement and mixing can make or break your
       song, as long as you don't use my mixing techniques you won't spoil
       your music that quickly :)
     -Never give up and think twice before uploading rather than working a
       bit more on your creation.

  Something that bothered me a couple of times during the past few years:

     -Don't bite the hand that feeds you; I notice when archive
       maintainers like TiS and scene.org have to do things to keep the
       servers alive and upgradable to meet the ever increasing audience
       and users, they get a lot of flame mail about going commercial.

     The world of free stuff always has been an illusion but up to the
  moment before it gets out of hand it is affordable and the moment when
  the people can't maintain it from own funding anymore, they turn
  "commercial" as most sceners call it that way... That is the moment the
  archive meets its doom or its fortune depending if the users appreciate
  the existance of the archive and it's background by tolerating those
  measures.

     Consider what your benefits have meant to you so far and how they
  might benefit other artists. If you upload your work there to become
  a known legend you attach a value to the service of the site but moral
  support is at a certain point not enough anymore for survival. Flaming
  archive maintainers for their survival techniques is pretty hypocritical
  when those same people did something good to you. For sure that you
  can't fix such things as soon as they're broke(n).

     Good... A lot has been pinned down, not everything but globally
  you're reading my complete scenical biography. There is a lot most
  people don't know about me because most of the work done has been
  background material for years before it was ever released and even
  afterwards most pieces done would never fit into any demo-concept.

     I do hope that the purpose of releasing versatile material can be
  noticed as I never kept my musical styles into one corner, I tried many
  styles to prevent being pushed into a corner. Hiding like a Chameleon is
  what I stand for, the colours I put in front of you are more important
  to notice that the shapes and contours I will always have.

                --Vincent Voois


--=--=--
--=--=------=--=------=--=----
  Inscene 2K Report
  By:  Seven
----=--=------=--=------=--=--

  Friday 14 July
  --------------
  21:22 -- OK, I've arrived at Wilsele-Putkapelle (the partyplace) one
  hour ago, so it's definitely time to start this log.

     I spend last week at Baxter/Green's house, because he held a small
  game/LAN party for his fellow engineer students and some informaticians
  like Quasar and I. I learned quickly that I have an in-born talent to
  be fragged 10  times a minute at Quake 3 and the like, so I abstained
  from gaming (except tetrinet, hehe) and instead concentrated at coding
  effects for a 64K intro.  Too bad Baxter decided not to visit Inscene
  because no one else from Green would be there. Instead, he went to the
  Beach Rock festival with the other engineer students, and I had to
  travel to Inscene alone and without productions, as my 64K wasn't even
  half-finished (boohoo, snif, snif).

     Upon entering the partyplace, I almost immediately spotted Djefke, a
  hard-core Linux addict, who managed to make within 5 minutes some
  derogatory remarks about my "fischerprice operating system" Windows98
  :) He had installed his stuff at the back of the hall, but remembering
  last year's noise level at that place, I choose a place near the
  bigscreen. The Aspirine guys were there too, and just like last year
  they were making a demo for the compos.

     The organizers announced the first food-run: you could order pizzas,
  fries and other junk food and they would go and buy it for you. Really
  useful service IMHO. You could also bring stuff on CD to the
  server-room to be shown on the bigscreen. As I had 2 CDs with wild
  demos in my collection, I gave these to the orgos and they were shown
  immediately. Legoland, Penguin Paradise, South Party, Red Dot, ...
  They're all way more impressive than on a monitor, although the sound
  quality was rather poor.


  22:55 -- Thanks to Djefke, I had the network protocol details right in
  no time, so I could start browsing. I don't like it when my harddrive
  is constantly in use by other downloaders, so I tried to upload all the
  things I wanted to share to the main ftp-server. Well, I wasn't the
  only one who had that idea, cause uploading was snail-like slow. Later
  I saw a photo on the net from the server's statistics program:
  download=195.4KB/sec, upload=9753.5 KB/sec.  Almost 10MB/sec upload,
  that's quite some pressure for a single server :)

     A Simpsons episode is shown on the bigscreen. I prefer demo-related
  stuff, but I agree it's a tiny bit better than a winamp plugin or so.


  Saturday 15 July
  ----------------
  00:11 -- Now the movie Final Destination is shown. Typical horror movie
  with the "which pretty teenager will die next?" theme. The network is
  still very slow, I think there may be something wrong with my settings
  :(. At the moment, there are about 60 people, which is less than last
  year, but probably some more people will arrive today (Saturday
  already).

     Last year there was a TV-crew, remember? The mpeg of that TV-program
  was on the server, I've watched it and it's even worse then I had
  expected. Show this to your parents and they'll lock you up in your room
  whenever you mention the possibility of attending a demoparty. No
  explanation of demos, but instead focusing on the loud music, the
  fast-food and the lack of sleep. Let me just quote the very first
  sentence: "Wilsele-Putkapelle is a place-to-be for the international
  computer world, thanks to the local parish hall, where about hundred
  computer maniacs have gathered to beat each other in a marathon of bits
  and bytes." I wonder how they would describe Assembly or The Party, with
  a few thousands "computer maniacs" :)


  02:47 -- The surprise-compo rules should have been announced 4 hours
  ago, but when I asked the orgos, they said "Hmm? Do we have surprise
  compos? OK, we'll make up some rules." It seems that, after the
  organizing and build-up of the party, some orgos are so tired that
  they're not 100% focused on the party anymore (although alcohol might
  also have some influence :)). Well, half an hour later the rules were
  online, so I could start coding. I don't like to go to a party without
  any contributions, and a surprise entry is better than nothing. A
  proggy that draws a circle that morphs into an ellipse... That should
  not be too hard.


  04:21 -- Behind me, the Aspirine crew is clearly making a surprise music
  tune. The rules are: make the best possible module, using the files on
  the Inscene website (HTML, gif,...) as samples. The resulting sounds very
  chiptune-like, quite funny but when you hear it in 50 different
  versions during 1 hour, the headache-danger is very big. Luckily, I
  brought my own asprin :) (Yep, never go to a demoparty without it)

     Drawing an ellipse is a little bit harder than I expected. Hmm, I
  remember we've seen some formulas a long, long time ago, in another
  galaxy... *think*  *think* ...


  05:08 -- Stupid me :) For some reason, I had the brilliant idea last
  week to put my network adapter in full-duplex iso the default
  half-duplex mode. Now I've switched it back to normal and voila, my
  transfer rate jumps from 30KB/sec to 800 KB/sec. So the network is
  indeed even faster than last year (if you've sensible settings, that
  is).

     Although the foodrun at 2 o'clock was announced to be the last for
  tonight (next one at 8 o'clock), the orgos have decided to add an extra
  "surprise foodrun". This news is received with enthusiasm by the
  ever-hungry audience.

     An old Apple Macintosh is used as an presence list: everyone is
  invited to sign it. I like this kind of weird ideas that increase the
  scenish feeling, just like the name-cards everyone got at the entrance.


  07:29 -- The main soundsystem is playing some dumb housetracks, which I
  can't really appreciate in my tired state of mind. I thought for a
  moment that the dance-compo had started, because Impulse Tracker is
  visible on the bigscreen. But that would mean that the compo has
  started one hour *before* the announced time, and it will freeze in
  hell before such a thing happens on a demoparty :)

     Since my code is almost working (in 320*200 iso 320*240, as required),
  I'll escape the noise by taking a nap in the sleeping room. See you
  again within a few hours.


  11:57 -- Wake up just enough to get up and walk to my PC without
  crashing into walls or innocent bystanders. Djefke is taking pictures
  for a party-report he wants to create (with code & music, not just a
  picture-pack). I order a Pizza Hawaii for breakfast (love the food
  support here), and start to look at the pile of TXT/DOC-files that
  reside in the INFO/DEMO/VGA section of my HD. I have to find out whether
  mode X or VESA is the smallest way to get a 320*240 mode.

     On the bigscreen, they show powerpoint-slides with info about the
  compos, the surprise-compos and the IP-addresses of servers. A simple
  but efficient way to keep people informed. Watch and learn, Ambience
  orgos!


  14:24 -- Oh my god. Besides the foodruns, you can now also order
  spaghetti for  this evening! What happened to the "demoparty = 3 days
  unhealthy food" tradition? And why can't those +1000-people parties
  provide the same services? (Imagine an organizer entering the pizza
  shop: "75 big pizzas of this kind, and 120 small ones of that kind, and
  ... :))

     There were some rumors that due to problems with sponsors, there
  would be no prizes, but it was announced that several Linux releases
  and a harddisk were added to the prize pool. Good thing, because more
  people have arrived now, so now there are about the same number of
  attendants like last year (about 80).


  15:01 -- The first compo (dance music) has started. There are 4 songs,
  but I don't like most of them. I'm not a fan of the genre, although I'd
  describe that last tune (New Millenium/Cyborg Jeff) as "above-average
  quality noise". The normal music compos has also only 4 tunes, but they
  range from a 36K chiptune to an 1,4 MB song with full-time vocals. Hmm,
  will be hard to vote, they're all quite enjoyable...


  17:46 -- Djefke has finally managed to burn his first CD at the party,
  and wants to celebrate this with an Unreal-deathmatch. Of course,
  rather than playing with the experts, he wants me for an easy target :)
  Alas, there's something wrong with his connection and he left the CD
  with the drivers at home, so  we can't compare our lack of skills...
  (And we can still look down upon all those lame gamers, hehe)

     Fed up with non-working mode X code, I've just slapped my standard
  VESA routines on the ellips-proggy, and entered that. It's now a bulky
  371 bytes big, but I don't feel like optimizing it since I'll probably
  be the only one to compete in the surprise code compo. No other
  assembler coders can be seen when I check out the monitors...

     The harddisk and XT-throwing compos are delayed due to the typical
  Belgian bad weather.


  18:10 -- The 100KB game compo has been held, with two entries. The first
  was a small space shoot-them-up by PPP-team, with very good graphics
  and an OK chiptune, but the levels clearly weren't finished. The second
  was a 1155 byte TSR-program in textmode that changed the
  background-colors to show a tetris-game. So you can use any monochrome
  textmode utility and play tetris at the same time :)


  19:30 -- The rain has stopped for a while, and the harddisk throwing
  compo has taken place. I really wonder for which computer that harddisk
  was designed, probably the ENIAC or so: it was at least 10*20*35 cm big
  and weighted a lot of kilos. Space, one of the orgos and 2 meter tall,
  threw the thing over 7 meters far just for demonstration, and no one
  was able to do better. Your weak reporter got only 4 m and some cm, so
  I was the 14th out of 18 competitors (clearly, the unhealthy food and
  the lack of sleep had already negatively influenced my powers :)).

     To my surprise, A0a/Green arrived during the compo. A0a is short for
  Andromeda, if you need to pronounce it. He told me that he was actually
  there as A0a/Velocity, since that Finnish group had asked him to submit
  a 64K intro at Inscene, so he was now also a Velocity member. As this
  was a very recent thing, he hadn't knew beforehand that he would visit
  the party, and hence Baxter hadn't know it either. A0a took a chance on
  the harddisk-throwing, and placed 3rd. Of course, HE was 100% rested :)


  19:58 -- Oops, problem! A0a's only diskette is corrupted! And since
  there's no Internet at the party, he can't download the correct
  version! We asked the organizers whether there was a cybercafe in the
  vicinity, but the answer was no :( Luckily one organizer has a
  net-connection in his student-home, so now he and A0a are driving to
  Leuven, the nearby city where that home is located.


  Sunday 16 July
  --------------
  01:27 -- Oh oh, I've totally forgotten this log. Let's catch up: A0a got
  back with a perfectly working intro (was checked on the compo machine).
  Since A0a has no computer with him, we watched some Futurama episodes
  on my PC, in between the compos. The graphic compos were not very
  spectacular, neither the pixeled nor the raytracing compo. Two
  4K-intros were shown, and the second, called Sex, was really very good:
  funky adlib music, beautiful fractals, funny texts, morphing 3D objects.
  In the 64K compo, there was only one entry: Dream/Velocity, and the
  same happened in the demo-compo, with Life is a Bizz/Aspirine as the
  only entry. If you have Linux, check that one out: it's a fake
  powerpoint presentation in a real "corporate business style", about how
  you can make a living by winning democompos today. It's funny and
  ironic, but there are some things (like the checklist for making a
  Shad-like demo) that are almost true. In the wild compo, there was
  Aspirine's chiptune-disk for Linux, a text-demo in an IT module, a demo
  made entirely of basic-programs and bat-files, and some weird darts
  game.

     Then we had a long talk with Djefke who had joined us, about MP3s and
  VidX (that new movie compression format which is already very popular),
  about nostalgia and the history of the Belgian scene. It seems the
  Belgian groups always fall apart or become inactive before they reach
  their full potential :(. Meanwhile, some good intros and demos were
  shown on the bigscreen, such as Heaven 7/Exceed.

  11:14 -- I've given up all hope to update this thing on a more regular
  base, and I hope the same for you :) But I'll try to recover as much of
  my memories as possible. A0a and I were very tired and wanted to get
  some sleep, but we had ordered a pizza at the last foodrun for tonight,
  so we had to wait until it was delivered. The Aspirine guys were
  watching Mr. Black/Orange, so we decided to watch some demos too. My
  "job" as a reviewer forces me to download a lot of demos, so I've more
  recent stuff than the average scener does. After devouring our pizza
  when it arrived, I went to the sleeping room but I returned to submit
  my votesheet (on paper, yes). Last year I slept right through the
  voting deadline, and I didn't want to do that again. A0a slept sitting
  at the table, cause he had no sleeping bag with him.

     Since my parents had taken the car on their holiday to Germany, I had
  no transport back home. When I had learned that Baxter wouldn't go to
  Inscene, I had mailed Cyberphest, one of the orgos, if he knew people
  from the vicinity of Gent that had space for 1 scener + PC left, but he
  had answered they would ask it to the audience at the partyplace. When I
  woke up, I asked the orgos to do that, but no one from Gent was here :/
  Being the cautious type, I had arranged with Baxter that I could call
  him if I couldn't find transport. So I did.

  In the evening, back home
  -------------------------
     Better finish this report before I forget all  things that happened:
  for an unknown reason, my CD-rom refused to run Futurama-CDs any longer,
  so we were left without entertainment. Since the bigscreen hadn't been
  in use for some time, I asked the orgos if we could show some demos. No
  problem, they led us to the compo-pc behind the bigscreen, started the
  beamer and left. So we had complete control over the bigscreen, yoohoo!
  The compo machine was a P3 550, 128 MB, Voodoo 2 with 128 MB, so we
  could try some heavy-duty demos. For the interested: the rotozoom at the
  end of Contour/TBL has *still* a multi-second delay in it, and some
  scenes in Bleam/Statix aren't very smooth either. For older demos, the
  hardware overkill had some strange results: the music of Genocyd started
  10 seconds later than the visuals, and suddenly was played faster to
  catch up with the timing of the 3D-scenes.

     Djefke had joined us, and so had Baxter who had arrived too. After
  maybe one and a half our of showing demos, Space came saying that they
  needed the screen for the prize ceremony. A pity, cause there were still
  a lot of demos I'd liked to have seen. Control/Green, for example,
  although Baxter and A0a had protested when I copied that demo from CD to
  the harddisk. They are really too modest, I think :)

     First the surprise music compo was held, just two tunes of which the
  Aspirine one was clearly better, so there was no voting for that. The
  prize ceremony wasn't very surprising, in most compos there was enough
  difference in quality to know the winner beforehand. Only the
  raytrace-compo ended in a par: Cyclops en D-3 had equal points, but
  after talking with them, the orgos decided to give D-3 the first place
  because he had worked much longer on his picture than Cyclops, whose
  picture was a one-hour party production. A0a collected the prize for
  Dream/Velocity. And of course, there *was* a second entry in the
  surprise coding compo, which beat mine by over 100 bytes. I didn't
  really care, although I was curious how the coder did that. When asked,
  he showed my his code, and he had hard-coded the number of the video
  mode for the compo-machine (which was allowed by the orgos).

     At the end, the orgos explained the troubles with the sponsors: 3COM,
  one of the main sponsors, has for some reason decided to stop the
  production of the low-end equipment like hubs and switches, so they
  were not interested anymore in sponsoring the party (sceners usually
  don't buy the more expensive stuff).

     There had not been any foodruns today, maybe because it's Sunday and
  most shops are closed, and when everyone started to pack, the orgos
  asked for people who had any food left, to bring it to the server-room,
  because the entire crew was famishing. I had some bread and orange
  juice left, so I did bring it to them, and so did some other visitors.
  The reaction from the orgos was "Huh?! This works? People actually DO
  bring food ?!? Thank you, thank you!" :D

     After buying a party T-shirt (there were still some left, which were
  sold at reduced prize), I put my stuff in Baxter's car. We said goodbye
  to our friends, and drove home. Another great party was over. I've to
  say that I was a bit disappointed at the start of Inscene due to the
  low attendance. I had expected a big increase, say a total of 150
  sceners, cause Inscene'99 had been pretty good too. But thinking about
  it a bit more, I realized a lot of the specific things that make
  Inscene so fun, cannot be continued if the party grows a lot. The food
  support, the availability of the organizers, the  possibility to show
  whatever you want on the bigscreen... Also, Inscene is organized during
  the summer holidays, and lots of other demoparties take place around
  the same time: VIP, Horizon, Scene Event, Euskal ... So the chance of
  Inscene growing too fast is small, and now I like it that way. Big
  thanks to Space, Appel, Cyberphest and all other organizers for Inscene
  2K, and I hope to be there again next year.

                --Seven


--=--=--
--=--=------=--=------=--=----
  FLaG 2000 - European Demoscene Meeting
     Final Results
  By:  Gekko
----=--=------=--=------=--=--
  Generated with Greenroom Party Organizer Toolbox v1.0a

  4 channel music
  ---------------
  Place    Title                   Author                 Points    Number

   1.      Islands in the Sky      Just                      119         3
   2.      Dentist Pigeon          Nagz                       66         2
   3.      Country Draqla          DJ Vuk                     25         7
   4.      Nelibilo                Nula                       24         8
   5.      Arachnophilia           Arachno                    22         1
   6.      Kyrandia                DJ Kabal                   18         4
   7.      Fekete 21               Vincenzo                   18         6
   8.      Demomodul #2.           Carlos / BvT               17         9
   9.      Wide Open Room          Xhale                      13         5


  Multichannel music
  ------------------
  Place    Title                   Author                 Points    Number

   1.      A jelenben              Gibson                     30         3
   2.      Piece of Mind           Stanley                    27         4
   3.      Painful Afternoon       Towerx                     25         6
   4.      Two Hands Help Ya       Just                       22         2
   5.      Flying Drums            Impulse Creator            21         8
   6.      Months Away             Netpoet                    21         1
   7.      Picard                  Mistia                     20         5
   8.      Forfota                 Mistia                     15        11
   9.      Sitaotmimatryabagorl    Nagz                       10         7
  10.      Winter Dream            Phuture Kemist              7        10
  11.      San Pedro Cactus        DJ Vuk                      5         9


  MP3 music
  ---------
  Place    Title                   Author                 Points    Number

   1.      Fankadeli Project       Towerx                     78         3
   2.      Re                      Vil                        53         8
   3.      Effects in the Rain Forest III. John Uram          45         5
   4.      Kapd be az életem!      Húsdaráló Project          31         6
   5.      Cyberluv                Mistia                     31         9
   6.      ConGame                 Phuture Kemist             20         2
   7.      I Like Da Mjuzik        Vincenzo                   18         4
   8.      Ludas Matyi Gets Down   DJ SAN Tsung               15         7
   9.      Sky                     Covex                      10        10
  10.      Continuepolitics        Avalanche                   7         1


  4K intro
  --------
  Place    Title                   Author                 Points    Number

   1.      TheFa Lite              Power Rangers              48         1


  64K intro
  ---------
  Place    Title                   Author                 Points    Number

   1.      Heat                    Dilemma                   113         4
   2.      7 Minutes               Aromatherapy               80         5
   3.      Dast                    Power Rangers              67         3
   4.      Axiom Remix             Terror Opera               19         2
   5.      Claustrum               Castrum Doloris            13         1


  PC demo
  -------
  Place    Title                   Author                 Points    Number

   1.      TheF                   Power Rangers             217         2
   2.      Haugyjobb               Astral                    109         5
   3.      Konplex:54              fresh!mindworks            95         1
   4.      6th Lenin               United Force               73         4
   5.      E2K                     Digital Dynamite           31         3


  Amiga demo
  ----------

  No entries, compo cancelled.


  Commodore 64 demo
  -----------------
  Place    Title                   Author                 Points    Number

   1.      Animetion               Tempest                   139         1


  Commodore 64 gfx
  ----------------
  Place    Title                   Author                 Points    Number

   1.      Lost Name               Poison                    100         5
   2.      Fear                    Leon                       70         2
   3.      Hellraiser              AMN                        62         3
   4.      Battle Graal            Sebaloz                    49         1
   5.      Leon Macskája           Leon                       23         4
   6.      Violator                TGM                        23         6


  Commodore 64 music
  ------------------
  Place    Title                   Author                 Points    Number

   1.      In da City              Vincenzo                  119         2
   2.      Compomusic              Control                    78         1
   3.      Scream                  Johnny                     43         3


  Pixel graphics
  --------------
  Place    Title                   Author                 Points    Number

   1.      Windows                 ir                         62         6
   2.      Lapinots                Exocet                     47         2
   3.      It Scares Me            Zthee                      32         5
   4.      Nagymamiii!             Blackhand                  29         4
   5.      Night Passion           Poison                     28         3
   6.      Jutalom                 Baráth Endre                5         1

  Raytrace graphics
  -----------------
  Place    Title                   Author                 Points    Number

   1.      Petra: The Forgotten City Dob                     134         5
   2.      Ghosts                  Narn                       77        11
   3.      Rocky Road to Pichways  Zmilosh                    44         2
   4.      Ibanez GWB1 bass        Gargaj                     16        12
   5.      Vízió és mágia          Lewin                      15         8
   6.      After Death             Fanatic Twins              13         7
   7.      Tuticool                Avalon                     13         3
   8.      My Room                 Dunszt                     11        10
   9.      Revolver                Shanon                     10         9
  10.      Sandbay                 Magic Touch                 9         6
  11.      Icokusima Gate          Dob                         8         4
  12.      Chopper                 III. John Uram              7         1


  True color graphics
  -------------------
  Place    Title                   Author                 Points    Number

   1.      Plastik Butterfly       Arn                        73         5
   2.      One Night               Partikle & Inferno         61         8
   3.      The last rose what I can give Blackhand            51        16
   4.      Yawn                    Inferno                    43         9
   5.      Father Time             Magicboy                   41        11
   6.      Felnin                  Trotskij                   26         7
   7.      Atrocity                ir                         20        12
   8.      Ants and Mushrooms      WIZard Raist               16         2
   9.      Bird                    Baráth Endre               16         1
  10.      Remember                Zork & Chain               15         4
  11.      Stage Nine              Ezah                       10        13
  12.      Cyber Hell              Fraud                       7         3
  13.      Looking for more        Partikle                    5         6
  14.      Red Bull                Chain & Zork                4        10
  15.      Deadly Flowers          Blackhand                   2        14
                                    (oil painting, scanned)
  16.      Destroyer               Magic Touch                 1        15


  Wild demo
  ---------
  Place    Title                   Author                 Points    Number

   1.      Piknik - Trailer        ir                        138         2
   2.      Exhumers Radio          Exhumers                   84         1
   3.      Party Rendered Flashing Millerson                  31         3
   4.      Darling TV              Nick (digital video)       17         4


--=--=--
--=--=------=--=------=--=----
  In Tune
     Flashback: The Trax Weekly Days
  By:  Coplan and Setec
----=--=------=--=------=--=--
  -=- Introduction -=-
     I pride myself on this column.  Many of you may not know, but this
  column is the reason Static Line exists at all -- at least in part.  In
  Tune was originally published in Trax Weekly for a few issues, shortly
  before Gene Wie disappeared from the scene.

     With a large void in my regular schedule, I decided to start Static
  Line, and I took this column with me.  The magazine has grown to what it
  is today, and I'm rather proud of that.  But most of all, I owe a lot to
  this column.  So, as a special this month, in the 24th issue of Static
  Line, I am publishing the original In Tune article from Trax Weekly.

     Enjoy!

  -=- "Blue Flame" by Chris Jarvis -=-
  (Article originally posted in Trax Weekly Issue #110)

     In Trax Weekly issue #107 (maybe it was #106), Psibelius asked for
  suggestions to improve the quality of Trax Weekly.  In issue #108,
  Psibelius published a letter from Lachlan Barclay in response to
  Psibelius' request.  Lachlan's suggestion (in short) was to pick out a
  track every week and designate it "Mod of the Week".  Out of that letter
  came this column which I am calling "In Tune".  On a regular basis
  (weekly when I'm able to), I will review a fairly new song that I think
  is worthy of some public attention.  All said and done, lets move on to
  our first installment of "In Tune".

     This week's tune is "Blue Flame" by Chris Jarvis of Analogue.  Many of
  you may already have the song and not even know it.  If you have already
  downloaded your own copy of Impulse Tracker 2.14, you may want to check
  your ZIP file a little more closely.  If you haven't already, extract
  CHRIS31B.IT and load it up in your own copy of Impulse Tracker.  Sit
  back, relax and enjoy.

     When I first played this song, the first thing that I noticed was the
  attention that Chris puts into his percussion.  This is the one element
  that is most often overlooked in the average song these days.  Not only
  is his percussion clean, but it follows the mood of the song.  As the
  song becomes more intense, so does it's percussion.  On very few
  accounts in this song will you find a "pre-fabricated" snare and bass
  drum pattern.  But look beyond the snare and base drum.  Listen to the
  cymbols and hi-hats.  They are both constantly playing through the song.
  This gives the song depth. Hear those rolls on the hi-hat near order 31?
  That's a style some of you will recognize from Dave Matthew's Band. In
  real time, it's a style that marks a good drummer.  In the tracking
  world, its the mark of a person that knows his percussion.

     On a more technical observation, the key to this song's success is
  Chris' choice of samples.  Many of the samples were his own, sampled
  from a Roland E70 synth.  But what is more important is the fact that
  you can't tell which samples weren't made specifically for this song.
  All these samples collectivly form a perfect sample set where each
  specific sample compliments each of the other samples.  Chris even went
  so far as to include two types of feedback.  That first type (Feedback
  1) can barely be heard at all in the song.  But take it out, and the
  trained ear (not even a well trained one at that) will notice the
  difference.

     All in all, "Blue Flame" is a tightly fabricated song where detail is
  everything, and everything is accounted for.  Those of you looking for a
  new tune to study, there is much to learn from Chris Jarvis' song.

                --Coplan


     "In Tune" is a regular column dedicated to the review of original and
  singular works by fellow trackers.  It is to be used as a tool to expand
  your listening and writing horizons, but should not be used as a general
  rating system.  Coplan's and Setec's opinions are not the opinions of
  the Static Line Staff.

     If you have heard a song you would like to recommend (either your own,
  or another person's), We can be contacted through e-mail useing the
  addresses found in the closing notes.  Please do not send files attached
  to e-mail without first contacting us.  Thank you!


--=--=--
--=--=------=--=------=--=----
  Guest Song Review
     n-voice ep by dizmal
  By: Eino Keskitalo
----=--=------=--=------=--=--
 n-voice ep by dizmal
 released by plastik recordz - http://plkrekz.cjb.net/
 size: 260634 bytes (zipped)
 intro plus three tracks, format IT

 -=- Editor's Note -=-

 The website disclosed here returns a "Forbidden" error message.  I
 publish this with the expectation that the website will return to normal
 standing soon.  Thanks for your patience.
                -- Coplan

 -=-

     These tracks represent the monotonous techno-thingie, being nothing
  very spectacular rhtyhmically or melodically. Trick is in the quality of
  sound (not meaning phwoar! it's 24-bit 44khz!): Most of the samples
  sound very distorted, if not plain inverted. This results as noise, edge
  and unforgiving roughness. It also sounds quite pleasing to me, being
  cold and warm at the same time.

     Although it's supposed to be repetetive, monotoniq as it wants to be,
  there's a certain lack of sublety in transitions, resulting as a few
  clumsy progressions in the beginning of track one, partially also on
  track three, but it's a powerfull effect too on that particular track
  (regarding the melody lines).

     Although it's not as developed as I'd like it to be, the atmosphere
  is right, and overall I like this trip a lot. Try it out, might be
  something new for you.

                --Eino Keskitalo


--=--=--
--=--=------=--=------=--=----
  The Listener
     Music from Sense and Lime
  By:  Tryhuk
----=--=------=--=------=--=--

     I have to think on the depressive minimalism that appears in the
  scene more and more often. When we hear too sweet track, we say it's
  crap and this kind of stuff, but have you ever seen a person that  would
  say that some sad/depressive track is shit? I haven't. Of course I don't
  talk about technique.


  -=- Bubble blower            -=-
  -=-                 -- Sense -=-

     This track impressed me by nice lead idea and it's effective use in
  combination with evolved background ambience which sounds more
  complicated than the lead itself. Also percussion is here only on the
  place of rhythm holder and tempo manipulator, because tempo of the lead
  is fast, dynamic and monotonik enough to keep the song tempo itself.
  Genre is weird, background is influenced by mix of all the hip/trip hop
  styles together with movie soundtrack style, in some moments industrial.
  On the other hand, foreground sounds are very soft and clear and in a
  way they would fit to electronic minimalism. If you're into this kind
  of music, there's nothing more to be said than "try it".

  Song Information:
    Title:  Bubble blower
    Author:  Sense
    Release date:  2000
    Length:  4m59s
    Filename:  sense-bubble-blower.mp3
    File Size:  4688kb
    Source:  http://www.mono211.com


  -=- Bulentoi                 -=-
  -=-                  -- Lime -=-

     First comparison that popped in my mind is that this song is a
  "depressive electronic funk". But this description isn't exact, because
  later it starts to garther minimalistic and even dnb color. Melody goes
  on, then sudden change and nice chord progression comes in, proving that
  author has skill to make a good normal jazz/funk track. But song goes on
  in the experimental way and follows the laziness of your mind. It isn't
  a track that you have to hear, but it's nice thing to listen, when you
  lay on your sofa and do nothing.

  Song Information:
    Title:  Bulentoi
    Author:  Lime
    Release date:  21.6.2000
    Length:  4m40s
    Filename (zipped/unzipped):  milk0084.zip / lime-bulentoi.mp3
    File Size (zipped/unzipped):  4320kb / 4380kb
    Source:  http://milk.sgic.fi


                --Tryhuk


--=--=--
--=--=------=--=------=--=----
  Retro Tunage
     Blue pearl by Basehead
  By:  Tryhuk
----=--=------=--=------=--=--

     Deep and groovy bassline, dark monotonous rhythm and hypnotizing
  background sounds ripped from the best CDs, that's what opens this
  awesome track. "Blue pearl" is 5th track on the "Heavy Shadows" album
  and it belongs among my favourite songs by Basehead.

     Basehead's music can be described as a clone of ambient and dance
  music with touch of jazz, deep detroit sound and other alternative
  styles of dance music. This mix of styles isn't so unusual, but because
  of some  unknown reasons, basehead's approach stays original and
  unrepeatable.

     Although his tracks are quite long, it is very easy to flow away with
  them and one of the main reason is his awesome and unique tracking
  technique and original ideas - for example beginning and end of every
  pattern (or his smaller part) has lower volume and that improves overall
  dynamics of the track and it also enhances listeners orientation in the
  track. Or lead instruments with no sustain, they are often echoed many
  times with no volume change (but pitch can be different) and that makes
  the sound more rich and it also kicks you to write a lead with more
  harmonic progression, because new notes will meet echoes of the previous
  with full strength. There's a lot of other tricks and interesting ideas
  that can be found in this blue piece of sea and I'm not able to notice
  them all nor describe. But that doesn't matter, because as you sit to  a
  tracker, you discover, that you are doing same things, without thinking
  on it, without any analysis, your brain just takes these little tricks
  that basehead has searched for so long.

     It's not only excellent music for listening (but it is great to make
  a 2 hour playlist of ambient music by basehead, close yourself in  a
  living room and watch the rain that hits windows), but it it also  a
  music that you can study and I think that it will take you a lot of
  time to discover all tricks that bh used.

  Song Information:
    Title:  Blue pearl (Heavy Shadows album)
    Author:  Basehead / FM
    Release date:  April 9, 1997
    Length:  8m16s
    Filename (zipped/unzipped):  fm-hshad.zip / blupearl.it
    File Size (zipped/unzipped):  1.5mb / 959kb
    Source:  ftp.scene.org/pub/music/groups/fm/fm-hshad.zip

                --Tryhuk


--=--=--
--=--=------=--=------=--=----
  Screen Lit Vertigo
     Horizon'00 double review and "This Is" by Orion
  By:  Seven
----=--=------=--=------=--=--

  -=- "Time Machine" by Lettique & Friends: 1st place with 172 points -=-
  -=- "Tesla" by Sunflower:                 2nd place with 167 points -=-

  Found at www.scene.org

  System requirements:
     Time Machine: 10 MB HD, a not further specified 3D card, Windows 9x.
     Tesla: 8MB HD, Win32 (Win9x has this, dunno about winNT),
        OpenGL-compatible 3D card (3dfx/voodoo cards do not work
        because some textures are larger than 256*256)

  Test Machine: PII 350 64MB, SB16, TNT2 M64 32MB, Win98


  -=- "Time Machine" by Lettique & Friends -=-

  Code: Lettique
  Graphics: Malfunction, Kazic
  Music: Archon, TowerX
  3D: Lettique, Neuroup
  (I hope I got the credits right, they are shown extremely short)

     This demo starts with a short opening sequence of a complex leafless
  tree, whose branches are lit by multicolored butterflies. A symphonic
  intro tune sets the mood. A "Loading" message is shown and everything
  halts for almost two minutes, during which there is little disk
  activity. That probably means the demo is decompressing stuff, so the
  delay can vary greatly depending on your CPU power.

     The main part starts with a small earth that is surrounded by
  transparent  circles. The soundtrack is an energetic
  house/dnb/demo-style tune dominated by  the powerful percussion, with
  camera switches on each beat. While the small  earth rises above the
  circles, the credits are shown very shortly. Then a  complex machine is
  shown, consisting of tubes, pillars and a large clock.  Suddenly it
  comes alive, with the hands of the clock turning backwards,  lightning
  beams moving around and the earth flying through the tubes. The rest  of
  the demo is basically the voyage of the globe through the time machine,
  being  catapulted through cylinders and carried by an Atlas-like statue.
  At the end  all the sub-pieces of the timemachine come together and the
  earth is send to  its final place in the universe. This theme with it's
  carefully designed  "grand finale" makes it much more enjoyable to watch
  than a dumb 3D-object  show.

     Although it's mainly a 3D-demo, there are a few effects like motion
  blur or an  extreme zoom/perspective distort that bring some variation.
  Also fuzzy  photoshopped 2D images (for example the silhouette of a
  baby) are used here  and there. But the emphasis is on the 3D models and
  movements. They are no  stationary rooms and objects a la Shad, but
  neither realistic moving persons  as in The Fulchrum. It's somewhere
  in-between, with lifeless objects moving  together as in, hmm, a machine
  indeed. The music keeps the same rhythm all  over the demo, and the
  syncing is done solely by changing camera positions  on the beats.
  Together with the very dark textures, these quick changes can  make it
  hard to see what's going on.


  -=- "Tesla" by Sunflower -=-

  Code: Yoghurt
  Graphics: Saffron
  Music: Radix and Lluvia

     Compared to Wonder, Sunflowers previous accelerated demo, Tesla has
  very little "real" 3D objects. Most of the visuals are made by what I
  call texture-effects, with a lot of transparent textured surfaces that
  do not form a distinct entity. For example, after a strange vertical
  zoom/fold open effect with (rather ugly) horizontal lines through it,
  the title is shown on a background of merged textures, each one showing
  the same texture but a bit darker and at a different position,
  resulting in a kind of motion-blurred look. The same effect is used
  later with textures that have the same luminance but different sizes.
  Moving in a spiral, these give a fractal-like image. Other texture
  effects are a very good-looking tunnel made of glass fragments, and the
  spirals of white boxes. "Normal" 3D objects include a tangle of almost
  invisible tubes, and a large pillar out of which a face emerges. That
  last part has an ugly and highly visible bug: the camera moves *inside*
  the face, so you see only the pillar and a large hole.

     Although there is no theme, the whole demo has a very ambient
  feeling, mainly created by the transparent fuzzy look, and of course
  the music with its bird samples and very slow melody lines. After the
  first half, the tune changes suddenly by cutting the drumline and using
  an echoing bell-like lead, which fits the streaming columns of flares
  on the screen perfectly. I really like the relaxing mood of it.

     Besides the flare/text/color-mix textures, there are also pictures
  with recognizable objects, three of which are shown full-screen at the
  end for the credits. They all have the quite recognizable
  Saffron-style, blurry with sharp details here and there, which reminds
  me of old paintings.

     After installing new 3D drivers (again), that bug with the camera
  moving inside the head is gone. So the bug was probably caused by the
  old drivers, not by the coding/modeling of the Sunflower guys.


  -=- Comparison -=-

     As you can see from the results, there was a very close competition
  between these two demos, which Time Machine won with only 5 points. I
  think this is due the same principles that made Moai/Nomad win from
  State Of Mind/Bomb at The Party 8: Time Machine is a real party-demo,
  with impressive visuals, a fast, stirring soundtrack, and it follows a
  theme with a well-defined ending. Such demos are always very impressive
  the first time you see them, which is all that counts at a party.
  Tesla, on the other hand, is a more relaxed demo, without a theme, and
  whose mood isn't as easily appreciated after two days in a noisy  hall
  and not enough sleep. But they've of course the advantage of the big
  Sunflower name, which always causes some amount of name-voting. All in
  all, the two demos are very different, and which one you like best will
  depend on your personal taste. But both of them are of a very high
  quality, and surely worth checking out.



  -=- "This Is" by Orion (party-version) -=-

  Found at ftp.scene.org
  3rd place at TakeOver 2000 democompo

  System requirements: Win9x, DirectX 7, a Direct3D compatible 3Dcard
     (older cards like Voodoo 1 & 2 or ATI Rage do NOT work).
     3,8 MB HD. CPU or RAM not mentioned :(

  Test Machine: PII 350 64MB, SB16, TNT2 M64 32MB, Win98

  The demo:
       This is one very fresh and original demo! Really a pleasure to
  watch after all those heavy 3D/pure design demos. To start, except a
  logo at the start and  the end, it's almost completely black & white.
  That's not just to be original or due laziness :), it really adds
  something to the style.  After a drawing of a cute teddy-bear fading up
  on your desktop, and the usual setup box, we see some fake operating
  system box on which the question "What is a demo?" is entered, while
  keystrokes and a voice asking the same can be heard. The rest of the
  demo consists of short parts all highlighting a specific  part of a
  demo, always introduced by the voice saying "This is ... code/
  graphics/design/greetings/..." These quickly changing parts do not all
  have the same style. There are wireframed blobby objects and little
  pictograms following the Danish design trend, but there are also
  hand-pixeled pictures, or a 3D-scene of a crazy man driving through a
  hospital on a stretcher, with badly connected polys (in the  "this is
  oldskool"-part :)).  Despite these different styles, the demos has a
  consistent feeling due to the (lack of) colors, the speed of the effects
  and the subtle use of weird humor. For example, some of the French
  sentences in the demo mean "Bad luck! The  valiant Father Bear has
  forgotten to put on his left slipper!" or "Talk about it with your
  dentist". The music has also a lot of variation (and is thus hard to
  describe for me), the main theme reminds me of a idm/rock crossover with
  short melodic patterns in it, but there are a lot of soundeffects and
  sudden changes of style at the different parts. Unlike many other demos,
  where voice-samples are used very sparingly, here the "This is"-voice is
  heard frequently enough to give it a more realistic (non-tracked)
  feeling.


  Overall:
     If anyone ever asks you "what is a demo?", show them This Is. It's
  original, funny, stylish, and it actually tells something about
  demos/the scene. Really great production, which has only two minor bad
  points: the French text, which is not understandable for large parts of
  the scene, and the very small amount of 3D scenes, taken in account
  that this is a 3D-only demo.

                --Seven


--=--=--
--=--=------=--=------=--=----
  Guest Demo Review
     Flag 2000 Demo Reviews
  By:  Gekko
----=--=------=--=------=--=--

  -=- "Haugyjobb" by Astral -=-
  #2 in the demo compo at Flag 2000, Hungary

  credits: Arpi (code), Strepto (code, 3d), Wad (3d), Towerx (music),
     others
  download: ?
  requirements: Linux/Windows, OpenGL, good 3d card (eg. TNT2)

     A Linux only entry was shown at the party, the Windows version will be
  out about two weeks later  only. It can even happen that this article
  will be published earlier than the demo itself.

     The title of the demo is a play on words, 'Ha ugy jobb' means
  something like 'If it's better that way'. Haugyjobb is in fact a parody
  of the demos by Haujobb. I think that I am not too far from the truth if
  I say that the Mekka 2000 demo competition is the  reason why this demo
  was created. There Haujobb took both the 2nd and 4th places, while
  Astral's demo ranked only the 12th. Of course, one has to know at least
  these two Haujobb demos ('Mikro Strange' and 'Strange  Feelings') to
  understand the jokes in Haugyjobb.

     Inferno/Haujobb said that it is the best Astral demo so far. My
  opinion is the same: the music and the video is synchronized together
  perfectly, there are good effects and 3d scenes, even the colors are
  fine. Naturally the jokes are there, too.

     The music of 'Mikro Strange' was was a dub remake of an opera aria.
  Therefore the music by Towerx is basically a woman shouting. One can't
  help laughing when listening to it. The effects and 3d scenes are all
  miming the ones in the two Haujobb demos. The demo begins the same way
  as 'Mikro Strange' does. We are in a cave in which there are colorful
  fireworks. It ends with a picture of a skull. Then there is a blob
  effect: a picture of a woman is stretched on the blobs and we are flying
  in and out of them. There is a similar effect in 'Strange Feelings',
  this one is a bit better. The next scene is a screwed tube. We can see a
  text proudly showing off with the extra complex technique which is used
  to draw it, while the tube's surface is completely jaggy. Then the tube
  is shown from outside and it is jerking to the beat of the music. Then a
  man is flying in a tunnel and he is taking up weird poses. In another
  scene a fish is swimming in a river, and just passes by a huge
  fish-hook. This scene is beautiful: there are plants, the water is
  waving and there is a spectacular reflection mapping effect; although
  the colors could have been better. Of course it is very similar to a
  part in 'Mikro Strange'. There is a scene where many frogs are spinning
  over each other. Here the woman who is singing starts hopelessly
  shouting and crying her aria. Things then become mixed up and abstract,
  there are flashes, noises and  complete chaos - exaggerating the
  deranged part in 'Strange Feelings'. The final scene is a tribute to
  the brain operation of the robot in 'Strange Feelings'. A man is
  floating inside a big tube-shaped hall, and then there is a huge
  explosion, he gets an electric shock and he takes up the shape of the
  Haujobb logo figure. The end of the demo is the same as that of 'Mikro
  Strange': there is a blue bitmap effect in  the background while a
  yellow Haujobb figure is spinning in the  front. The difference is that
  here his leg is in plaster...

     I have seen the final version only once so far, at the party in the
  competition itself. That is why it is possible that some parts may be
  different or missing. To put it bluntly, I think that every scener
  should watch this demo.


  -=- "TheFa" by Power Rangers -=-
  demo, presented at Overdoze 5, Hungary

  credits: bali (code)
  download: ftp://ftp.scene.org/pub/parties/2000/overdoze5/
  requirements: Windows, OpenGL

     Overdoze 5 was held in the spring of 2000 in Hungary. It was not
  a party, just a small event of about 40-50 in attendance where sceners
  were watching demos together on a bigscreen.  Still it had
  two new presentations. The first was Volvox by Picard/Exceed, a
  kind of a preview of Heaven 7. This remained unreleased, it was just
  shown to the audience. The other was TheFa. TheFa has become a famous
  demo in the Hungarian scene by now, but it is probably completely
  unknown anywhere else. It is a simple yet very good 3d story about a
  tree. Note that 'fa' means 'tree' in Hungarian. It was released under
  the fake label 'Power Rangers' where the members use fake nicknames
  (usually the nicks of their real christian names), so you will never
  know who the author really is.. or?


  -=- TheFu by Power Rangers -=-
  winner of the demo compo at Flag 2000, Hungary

  credits: bali (code)
  download: ?
  requirements: Windows, OpenGL

     This demo is a sequel to TheFa (a demo at Overdoze 5). It
  surprisingly won the Flag 2000 party by a very large advantage: it got
  about two times as many votes as the second place.

     What I don't like in it are its colors, and that every effect lasts a
  bit longer than it should.  What I like in it is that it is simple,
  strange and  original. It is quite surprising to watch it for the first
  time. I decided not to describe the story in details, so as not to spoil
  the fun of this. The only thing I tell is that 'fu' is the Hungarian
  word for 'grass'.

                --Gekko


--=--=--
--=--=------=--=------=--=----
  Intro Watch
     Flag 2000 and Inscene 2000 Intros
  By:  Gekko
----=--=------=--=------=--=--

  -=- TheFa lite by Power Rangers -=-
  winner of the 4kb intro compo at Flag 2000, Hungary

  credits: bali (code)
  download: ?
  requirements: Windows, OpenGL

     'TheFa Lite' is the 4kb version of 'TheFa', a demo at Overdoze 5. It
  is an endlessly looping 3d effect of a fractal tree with spinning
  branches.


  -=- Dast by Power Rangers -=-
  #3 in the 64kb intro compo at Flag 2000, Hungary

  credits: locutus (code, 3d), gabi (gfx), zoli (music), pisti (code)
  download: ?
  requirements: Windows, DirectX, Pentium2/400+

     'Dast' is the yellow version of 'Heaven 7,' as Tomcat/Greenroom,
  the main organizer of Flag 2000 said at the prize giving ceremony.
  It has been put together at the party by... uhm... Locutus.

     It starts with a very good pixelized 'Dast' logo, and there is a
  spectacular effect similar to radial blur on it. The intro is made up of
  very good raytracing scenes and effects: spheres in water, a column with
  holes in it, a spherical mirror flying in a tunnel, a sphere with light
  beams coming out of it and others. The music is fast and energic, the
  effects are synchronised perfectly to it. The greetings part contains
  other Hungarian fake demogroups only (Power Rangers is also a fake group,
  but I hope you have already figured it out).


  -=- 7 Minutes - Aromatherapy by Inquisition -=-
  #2 in the 64kb intro compo at Flag 2000, Hungary

  credits: Vic (code), Nagz (music), IR (gfx)
  download: ?
  requirements: DOS, GUS, VESA, 320x200 32/24/16 bpp, Pentium2/400+

     '7  Minutes' is an intro with several bitmap and raytracing effects.
  Some parts are very spectacular, especially on a huge movie screen. One
  of these is a black and white raytracing part with reflections and a
  'dirty objective' effect. Another is a sphere, from which light is coming
  out. On the other hand, one must also note that there is hardly any
  design: the fonts are ugly and the colors are bad in several places.
  Some of the raytracing effects are quite slow. In spite of these it is a
  fine intro.


  -=- Heat by Dilemma -=-
  #1 in the 64kb intro compo at Flag 2000, Hungary

  credits: Nap (code), Brix (code), Sed (music), Ezah (gfx), Arn (gfx)
  download: ?
  requirements: Windows, OpenGL

     This is a very colorful one. It is in a way similar to 'Pole' by
  Aardbei.

     The graphics are almost limited to the textures which are good; and
  there is a Dilemma logo at the end which is not bad either. The music is
  quite good and it gives an abstract mood to the intro. There are 3d
  effects, including terrains, tunnels and morphing objects. These are not
  original, still they are very spectacular. Probably the best is the last
  one, a terrain with a fog which looks like a smoke.
     The music and the effects are kept together, eg. the material of the
  landscape flows according to the beat of the tune.


  -=- Dream by Velocity -=-
  winner 64k intro at Inscene 2000, Belgium

  credits: hebx2 (code), chavez (music)
  download: www.inscene.org, velocity.rulez.it
  requirements: Windows 95, DirectX 5, 32mb ram
  [review is based on the 80kb semi-final version]

     Dream by Velocity was the only participant of the Inscene 2000 intro
  competition.

     The tune by Chavez creates a gloomy mood, the visuals (colors and
  effects) support this. There is no storyline. The intro is a sequence of
  3d effects, which are loosely synchronised to the music. Most of them
  look fine, but neither is really original. There is, among others, a
  waving wall, a morphing cube and a kind of a column or tentacle. The
  intro uses software rendering, which here means that it is very slow and
  the textures appear to be quite blocky.

     There are little bugs and quirks everywhere (eg. we sometimes fly
  through the wall, etc). These spoil the intro, unfortunately. I like
  this intro, although some more time could have been spent on putting it
  together.

                --Gekko


--=--=--
--=--=------=--=------=--=----
  Scene Dirt
     News & Rumors
  By:  Coplan
----=--=------=--=------=--=--

  -=- KOZMIK/NEXTEMPIRE Releases Source Code -=-
     KOZMIK/NEXTEMPIRE has released the assembler source code to an intro
  reelased at Assembly 2k.  The intro is PACMAN4K, and it took 8th at
  Assembly 2k on August 3, 2000.
  http://www.multimania.com/pacman4k/pac4ksrc.txt


  -=- Sista Vip Looking for Wired ASM Coders -=-
     Last month, they were looking for pixelers, now they're looking for
  ASM coders.  Will it ever end?  If you can handle 32bit ASM code (No
  C++), contact Looping:  Sista_Vip@Yahoo.com
  http://www.sistavip.exit.de


  -=- Chaos Constructions 000 Party Place Changed -=-
     Apparently, the CC000 has more people registered than expected.  They
  are expecting over 400 sceners.  The party place has been moved to a new
  location:
     Kinoteatr voshod
     ulitza Pogranichnika Garkavogo, dom 22, korpus 1.

     According to Random, the best way to get there is to catch a taxi
  (184-T) from Prospect Veteranov subway station.
  http://www.chaosite.com/constructions/


  -=- Assembly 2k graphics on GFXzone -=-
     For those of you looking to get some of the GFX from Assembly 2k, you
  need only to go to GFXzone.  Fortunately so, because the entire
  compressed package is around 100MBs.
  http://gfxzone.planet-d.net/

  -=- Groovy Compo returns -=-
  Groovy Compo, the bi-weekly competition, is back in action.  Grab some
  sample packs and join in this fun competition.
  http://www.ukscene.org/groovycompo/

                --Coplan


  Scene Dirt is a semi-regular column offering the latest tidbits of
  information to its readers.  If you have any bits of information that
  you think should be here, contact coplan (coplan.ic@rcn.com) and offer
  as much information as possible.


--=--=--
--=--=------=--=------=--=----
  Editorial
     Are MP3s destroying the Music Scene?
  By: Coplan
----=--=------=--=------=--=--
     I was debating the other day with an unmentionable friend of mine over
  ICQ (to protect his privacy, I won't disclose his name).  He truly
  believes that MP3s are destroying the Computer Based Music scene.
  Actually, let me clarify, he specifically thinks that MP3s are
  destroying the art of Tracking.

     The MP3 debate is not a new one, and I have written about it many times.
  The fact that it keeps surfacing tells me that it'll be in our blood for
  a very long time before it either gets accepted, or replaced with a
  different format.  Truth be told, MP3 is not going to vanish from the
  Computer Based Music Scene.

  But let us consider some valid points offered by my friend:

     "...the atmosphere in which you could give a song/recieve a song and
     help someone with it is gone.  No messages/greets either.  And you
     can't single out channels."

     I believe the point here is that in MP3 format, one can't learn like
  they do in the modular formats, such as IT, XM, S3M, MOD.  This, I
  admit, is true.  You listen to an MP3 like you do a CD.  You can't
  single out one instrument, or one channel.  You have to take the whole
  thing for what its worth -- face value, not channel value.  Messages and
  Greets?  With the wonderful tool of ID3, you do have some ability to
  write something in your songs.  No, not a 10 line greet message -- but
  is it necessary?  I think not.

     The learning aspects aside, the MP3 format is still a very portable
  and convenient method of release.  I personally don't release in MP3,
  because my songs are very small to begin with.  If I were to release in
  MP3, it would almost quadruple the size of the file.  But, if I were to
  have a large song, it might be to my benefit to convert the finished
  product to MP3.

     But my friend dislikes MP3 format as a means of modular release, because
  often times effects are added to the MP3 to make the song sound much
  better.  These are effects that can be done (with skill) in most modular
  formats.  True, it is much easier to add a reverb to a jumbo sized wave
  file than it is to each instrument channel in Impulse Tracker.  I guess
  the concept is that the skill behind the song isn't so difficult
  anymore, and the skill is the root of the music.

     Is not a musical ear considered skill?  Adding effects and such are
  minor, in my book.  The finished product, effects or none, must be
  pleasurable and enjoyable (if intended).  It's all about the finished
  product, and the finished product still remains as a computer based
  music format.

     I hold no secret, my platform remains as such:  The Computer Based
  Music Scene is what I support.  Within that, I mostly support the
  Tracking Scene. However, MP3 or not, if the song was created on a computer,
  and it falls under my interests.  Is MP3 destroying the tracking scene?
  My personal belief is that it is not, rather it makes the tracking scene
  that much more prestigious.  If someone were to show me studio quality
  music in an IT format, I'd be very impressed.  I'd disect the song, and
  I'd study the technique.  In MP3 format, it'd just be another song to
  me.  But, if trackers were to release in only MP3 format, then they are
  not truly trackers, just that they track as a means to develop their
  music so that they can add their effects and such in their final
  product:  an MP3 file.  So, as more people release in MP3 format, there
  are less true trackers out there, and it starts to become more of a
  respected artform.

     But I will never review an MP3 song or judge a competition that allows
  MP3s.  As a critic and a judge, I'm interested in the underlying skill.
  And you just can't see that with MP3.  But as a music format, it is
  widely accepted on my computer.

                --Coplan


--=--=--
--=--=------=--=------=--=----
  Link List
----=--=------=--=------=--=--

  Featured Site:  Tetris
                  http://msg.sk/tetris
  Writeup By:     Coplan

  Browsing through Orange Juice, I discovered this site.  I was a bit
  confused at first!  The techno trax group refers to their members as
  "players" and they score the players based on how many songs they
  release (I believe -- though I could be wrong).  They even list high
  scores!  Kinda a fun site to play around on.  It's well done, and you
  can get some pretty good music from here though.  Just be warned -- you
  shouldn't visit this site when tired.

  Demo Groups:

      3g Design..............................http://3gdesign.cjb.net
      Aardbei.....................................http://aardbei.com
      Acid Rain..............................http://surf.to/acidrain
      Agravedict........................http://www.agravedict.art.pl
      Anakata..............................http://www.anakata.art.pl
      ANDESA Soft International..................http://andesa.da.ru
      Astral..............................http://astral.scene-hu.com
      Astroidea........................http://astroidea.scene-hu.com
      AtomiK....................................http://atomik.ini.hu
      Bomb..................................http://bomb.planet-d.net
      BlaBla..............................http://blabla.planet-d.net
      Blasphemy..............................http://www.blasphemy.dk
      Byterapers.....................http://www.byterapers.scene.org
      Calodox.................................http://www.calodox.org
      Chrome..............................http://chrome.scene-hu.com
      CoPro.....................................http://www.copro.org
      Damage...................................http://come.to/damage
      Dance...................................http://dance.flipp.net
      Defacto 2..............................http://www.defacto2.net
      Dolops......................... ........http://dolOps.scene.hu
      Exceed...........................http://www.inf.bme.hu/~exceed
      Fobia Design...........................http://www.fd.scene.org
      GODS...................................http://www.idf.net/gods
      Green.....................................http://green.dyns.cx
      Grif........................http://arrabonet.gyor.hu/~rattgrif
      Haujobb......................................http://haujobb.de
      Hellcore............................http://www.hellcore.art.pl
      IJSKAST.............................http://www.ijskast.cjb.net
      Immortals..............................http://imrt.home.ml.org
      Infuse...................................http://www.infuse.org
      Just For Fun...........................http://jff.planet-d.net
      Kilobite...............................http://kilobite.cjb.net
      Kolor................................http://www.kaoz.org/kolor
      Kooma.....................................http://www.kooma.com
      Label zero.........................http://labelzero.pganet.com
      Mandula.........................http://www.inf.bme.hu/~mandula
      Monar................ftp://amber.bti.pl/pub/scene/distro/monar
      Nextempire..................http://members.xoom.com/NEXTEMPIRE
      Ninja Gefilus.........http://www.angelfire.com/or/ninjagefilus
      Noice.....................................http://www.noice.org
      Orion..............................http://orion.arfstudios.org
      Popsy Team............................http://popsyteam.rtel.fr
      Quad........................................http://www.quad.nl
      Rage........................................http://www.rage.nu
      Replay.......................http://www.shine.scene.org/replay
      Retro A.C...........................http://www.retroac.cjb.net
      Rhyme................................http://rhyme.scene-hu.com
  <*> Sista Vip..........................http://www.sistavip.exit.de
      Skytech team............................http://www.skytech.org
      Sunflower.......................http://sunflower.opengl.org.pl
      Suspend......................http://www.optimus.wroc.pl/rappid
      Tehdas...................................http://come.to/tehdas
      Tesko..........................http://www.scentral.demon.co.uk
      The Black Lotus.............................http://www.tbl.org
      The Digital Artists Wired Nation.http://digitalartists.cjb.net
      The Lost Souls...............................http://www.tls.no
      TPOLM.....................................http://www.tpolm.com
      Trauma.................................http://sauna.net/trauma
      T-Rex.....................................http://www.t-rex.org
      Unik.....................................http://www.unik.ca.tc
      Universe..........................http://universe.planet-d.net
      Vantage..................................http://www.vantage.ch

  Music Groups:

      Aisth.....................................http://www.aisth.com
      Aural planet........................http://www.auralplanet.com
  <U> Azure...................................http://azure-music.com
      Blacktron Music Production...........http://www.d-zign.com/bmp
      Chill..........................http://www.bentdesign.com/chill
      Chippendales......................http://www.sunpoint.net/~cnd
      Chiptune...............................http://www.chiptune.com
      Da Jormas................................http://www.jormas.com
      Fabtrax......http://www.cyberverse.com/~boris/fabtrax/home.htm
      Five Musicians.........................http://www.fm.scene.org
      Fridge...........................http://www.ssmedion.de/fridge
      Fusion Music Crew................http://members.home.nl/cyrex/
      Goodstuff..........................http://artloop.de/goodstuff
      Ignorance.............................http://www.ignorance.org
      Immortal Coil.............................http://www.ic.L7.net
      Intense...........................http://intense.ignorance.org
      Jecoute.................................http://jecoute.cjb.net
      Kosmic Free Music Foundation.............http://www.kosmic.org
      Level-d.................................http://www.level-d.com
      Miasmah.............................http://www.miasmah.cjb.net
      Milk.......................................http://milk.sgic.fi
      Mah Music.............................http://come.to/mah.music
      Maniacs of noise...............http://home.worldonline.nl/~mon
      MAZ's Sound homepage.............http://www.th-zwickau.de/~maz
      Mo'playaz..........................http://ssmedion.de/moplayaz
      Mono211.................................http://www.mono211.com
      Morbid Minds..............http://www.raveordie.com/morbidminds
      Noise................................http://www.noisemusic.org
      Noerror......................http://www.error-404.com/noerror/
      One Touch Records......................http://otr.planet-d.net
      Park..................................http://park.planet-d.net
      Radical Rhythms.....http://www.andrew.cmu.edu/user/merrelli/rr
      RBi Music.............................htpp://www.rbi-music.com
      Ruff Engine................http://members.xoom.com/ruff_engine
      SHR8M......................................http://1st.to/shr8m
      Sound Devotion................http://sugarbomb.x2o.net/soundev
      Soundstate.........................http://listen.to/soundstate
      Sunlikamelo-D...........http://www.error-404.com/sunlikamelo-d
      Suspect Records........................http://www.tande.com/sr
      Tequila........................http://www.defacto2.net/tequila
      Tempo................................http://tempomusic.cjb.net
  <*> Tetris....................................http://msg.sk/tetris
      Theralite...........................http://theralite.avalon.hr
      Tokyo Dawn Records........................http://tdr.scene.org
      UltraBeat.........................http://www.innerverse.com/ub
      Vibrants................................http://www.vibrants.dk
      Wiremaniacs.........................http://www.wiremaniacs.com

  Others:

      Arf!Studios..........................http://www.arfstudios.org
      Calodox demolinks exchange.....http://calodox.planet-d.net/cde
      #coders..................................http://coderz.cjb.net
      Comic Pirates.........................http://scene-central.com
      Demonews Express.........http://www.teeselink.demon.nl/express
      Demo fanclub........................http://jerware.org/fanclub
      Demoscene.org news forum..............http://www.demoscene.org
      Digital Undergrounds.....................http://dug.iscool.net
      Doose charts...............................http://www.doose.dk
      Dreams2 CD.........................http://nl.scene.org/dreams2
      Freax...................http://freax.scene-hu.com/mainmenu.htm
      GfxZone............................http://gfxzone.planet-d.net
      Hugi size-compo...............http://home.pages.de/~hugi-compo
      Orange Juice.........................http://ojuice.citeweb.net
      PC-demos explained.....http://www.oldskool.org/demos/explained
      Pixel...................................http://pixel.scene.org
      Scenet....................................http://www.scenet.de
      Sunray..............................http://sunray.planet-d.net
      Swiss List.................http://www.profzone.ch/vantage/list
      Swiss Scene Server.......................http://www.chscene.ch
      TakeOver................................http://www.takeover.nl
      Textmode Demo Archive.................http://tmda.planet-d.net
      Hungarian scene page...................http://www.scene-hu.com
      Trebel...................................http://www.trebel.org
      Zen of Tracking.........................http://surf.to/the-imm

  DiskMags / SceneMags:

      Amber...............................http://amber.bti.pl/di_mag
      Amnesia...............http://amnesia-dist.future.easyspace.com
      Demojournal....................http://demojournal.planet-d.net
      Dragon......................http://www.wasp.w3.pl/pages/dragon
      Fleur................................http://fleur.scene-hu.com
      Heroin...................................http://www.heroin.net
      Hugi........................http://home.pages.de/~hugidownload
      Music Massage......................http://www.scene.cz/massage
      Planet Chartmag...........http://www.agravedict.art.pl/planet/
      Pain..................................http://pain.planet-d.net
      Scenial...........................http://www.scenial.scene.org
      Static Line......................http://www.ic.l7.net/statline
      Total Disaster...................http://www.totaldisaster.w.pl
      TUHB.......................................http://www.tuhb.org
      WildMag...........................http://www.wildmag.notrix.de

  FTPs:

      Amber.......................................ftp://amber.bti.pl
      Cyberbox.....................................ftp://cyberbox.de
      Flerp.....................................ftp://flerp.scene.hu
      Scene.org..................................ftp://ftp.scene.org
      Skynet archive.................ftp://acid2.stack.nl/pub/skynet
      ACiD2 Archive.............................ftp://acid2.stack.nl


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  Editor:            Coplan / D. Travis North / coplan.ic@rcn.com
  Assistant Editor:  Gekko / Gergely Kutenich / gk@scene.hu
  Columnists:        Coplan / D. Travis North / coplan.ic@rcn.com
                      Dilvish / Eric Hamilton / dilvie@yahoo.com
                      Gekko / Gergely Kutenich / gk@scene.hu
                      Louis Gorenfeld / gorenfeld@vrone.net
                      Setec / Jesper Pederson / jesped@post.tele.dk
                      Seven / Stefaan / Stefaan.VanNieuwenhuyze@rug.ac.be
                      SiN / Ian Haskin / sin@netcom.ca
                      Subliminal / Matt Friedly / sub@plazma.net
                      Tryhuk / Tryhuk Vojtech / xtryhu00@stud.fee.vutbr.cz
                      Virt / virt@bellsouth.net
  Technical Consult: Draggy / Nicolas St. Pierre / draggy@kosmic.org
                      Jim / Jim Nicholson / jim@kosmic.org

  Static Line on the Web:  http://www.ic.l7.net/statline
                           ftp://flerp.scene.hu/scene/DiskMag/StaticLine

     To subscribe to the Static Line mailing list, send an e-mail message
  to "majordomo@kosmic.org" with "subscribe static_line <your e-mail>" in
  the message text. You will then be asked to confirm your addition to the
  mailing list.  Expect a new issue during the first weekend of each
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     If you would like to contribute an article to Static Line, be aware
  that we will format your article with two spaces at the beginning and one
  space at the end of each line.  Please avoid foul language and high ascii
  characters.  Contributions should be mailed to Coplan
  (coplan.ic@rcn.com).

     See you next month!

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